CQUniversity Unit Profile
BMSC12010 Clinical Biochemistry
Clinical Biochemistry
All details in this unit profile for BMSC12010 have been officially approved by CQUniversity and represent a learning partnership between the University and you (our student).
The information will not be changed unless absolutely necessary and any change will be clearly indicated by an approved correction included in the profile.
General Information

Overview

This unit provides students with an understanding of the role of the clinical biochemistry laboratory in the diagnosis and management of human diseases and disorders. The unit focuses on quality control in the pathology laboratory setting, the biochemical rationale for the diagnosis, prognosis, and monitoring of blood electrolyte balance, blood gases, blood acid-base balance, hormones, diabetes mellitus, jaundice, cardiac and liver disease, gout, inherited metabolic disorders, renal dysfunction and malignant diseases. Students will be instructed on correct procedures for preparing blood and urine samples for analysis, and for interpreting results in a clinical biochemistry laboratory.

Details

Career Level: Undergraduate
Unit Level: Level 2
Credit Points: 6
Student Contribution Band: 8
Fraction of Full-Time Student Load: 0.125

Pre-requisites or Co-requisites

Pre-requisites BMSC11004 Introductory Biochemistry OR BMSC11005 Foundations of Biochemistry OR BMED19010 Macromolecules

Important note: Students enrolled in a subsequent unit who failed their pre-requisite unit, should drop the subsequent unit before the census date or within 10 working days of Fail grade notification. Students who do not drop the unit in this timeframe cannot later drop the unit without academic and financial liability. See details in the Assessment Policy and Procedure (Higher Education Coursework).

Offerings For Term 2 - 2019

Cairns
Mixed Mode
Rockhampton
Townsville

Attendance Requirements

All on-campus students are expected to attend scheduled classes – in some units, these classes are identified as a mandatory (pass/fail) component and attendance is compulsory. International students, on a student visa, must maintain a full time study load and meet both attendance and academic progress requirements in each study period (satisfactory attendance for International students is defined as maintaining at least an 80% attendance record).

Residential Schools

This unit has a Compulsory Residential School for distance mode students and the details are:
Click here to see your Residential School Timetable.

Class and Assessment Overview

Recommended Student Time Commitment

Each 6-credit Undergraduate unit at CQUniversity requires an overall time commitment of an average of 12.5 hours of study per week, making a total of 150 hours for the unit.

Class Timetable

Bundaberg, Cairns, Emerald, Gladstone, Mackay, Rockhampton, Townsville
Adelaide, Brisbane, Melbourne, Perth, Sydney

Assessment Overview

1. Written Assessment
Weighting: 15%
2. Practical and Written Assessment
Weighting: 25%
3. Examination
Weighting: 60%

Assessment Grading

This is a graded unit: your overall grade will be calculated from the marks or grades for each assessment task, based on the relative weightings shown in the table above. You must obtain an overall mark for the unit of at least 50%, or an overall grade of ‘pass’ in order to pass the unit. If any ‘pass/fail’ tasks are shown in the table above they must also be completed successfully (‘pass’ grade). You must also meet any minimum mark requirements specified for a particular assessment task, as detailed in the ‘assessment task’ section (note that in some instances, the minimum mark for a task may be greater than 50%). Consult the University’s Grades and Results Policy for more details of interim results and final grades.

Previous Student Feedback

Feedback, Recommendations and Responses

Every unit is reviewed for enhancement each year. At the most recent review, the following staff and student feedback items were identified and recommendations were made.

Feedback from Unit evaluations and email

Feedback

Excellent and engaging residential school

Recommendation

Maintain and continue to improve the student laboratory experience

Feedback from Unit evaluations and email

Feedback

Content was difficult and extensive but well presented and explained by the engaging lecturer

Recommendation

Maintain and improve some shorter content recordings to help with lecture content engagement

Feedback from Unit evaluations

Feedback

Assessment return was delayed which impacted on my study and stress

Recommendation

Support for completing assessment marking and organisation within the teaching team

Feedback from Unit evaluations

Feedback

Forum posts were not responded to in a timely manner

Recommendation

Unit coordinator/teaching team to improve communication strategy and engagement

Unit Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this unit, you will be able to:
  1. Describe basic cell signalling, communication and metabolism (breakdown of proteins, fats and carbohydrates under aerobic conditions).
  2. Recall, classify and evaluate significant pathological conditions which occur in the human body and their respective biochemical tests and assays.
  3. Recall and describe the major functions of a clinical pathology laboratory.
  4. Demonstrate competency in biochemical laboratory methods, test and techniques.
  5. Appraise the scientific literature and communicate this knowledge and understanding via scientific writing tasks such as practical reports and case study PBL assessment items.
Alignment of Learning Outcomes, Assessment and Graduate Attributes
N/A Level
Introductory Level
Intermediate Level
Graduate Level
Professional Level
Advanced Level

Alignment of Assessment Tasks to Learning Outcomes

Assessment Tasks Learning Outcomes
1 2 3 4 5
1 - Written Assessment - 15%
2 - Practical and Written Assessment - 25%
3 - Examination - 60%

Alignment of Graduate Attributes to Learning Outcomes

Graduate Attributes Learning Outcomes
1 2 3 4 5
1 - Communication
2 - Problem Solving
3 - Critical Thinking
4 - Information Literacy
5 - Team Work
6 - Information Technology Competence
7 - Cross Cultural Competence
8 - Ethical practice
9 - Social Innovation

Alignment of Assessment Tasks to Graduate Attributes

Assessment Tasks Graduate Attributes
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
1 - Written Assessment - 15%
2 - Practical and Written Assessment - 25%
3 - Examination - 60%
Textbooks and Resources

Textbooks

Prescribed

Clinical Chemistry 8th edn (2017)

Authors: Bishop, Fody and Schoeff
Wolters Kluwer
Philadelphia Philadelphia , PA , USA
ISBN: 9781496335586
Binding: Hardcover
Prescribed

Medical Biochemistry 5th edn (2018)

Authors: Baynes and Dominiczak
Saunders Elsevier
Philadelphia Philadelphia , PA , USA
ISBN: 978-0-7020-7299-4
Binding: Paperback

Additional Textbook Information

CL10 and CG93 Medical Science Pathology students should access the Bishop textbook due to related later courses/units which have some overlap; CG93 Medical Science (all others) and CG95 Paramedic Science should access the Baynes textbook which will have more relevance for your later courses/units.

IT Resources

You will need access to the following IT resources:
  • CQUniversity Student Email
  • Internet
  • Unit Website (Moodle)
Referencing Style

All submissions for this unit must use the referencing styles below:

For further information, see the Assessment Tasks.

Teaching Contacts
Wayne Pederick Unit Coordinator
w.pederick@cqu.edu.au
Andrew Fenning Unit Coordinator
a.fenning@cqu.edu.au
Paul Neilsen Unit Coordinator
p.neilsen@cqu.edu.au
Schedule
Week 1 Begin Date: 15 Jul 2019

Module/Topic

Cell Biochemistry - signalling (receptor and cell-cell communication)

Chapter

PowerPoint lecture notes with references (provided in the unit Moodle site)

Baynes 4th Ed Ch 40-41; 5th Ed Ch 25-26

Events and Submissions/Topic

Lecture content pre-recorded.  Timetabled tutorial (ISL/ECHO360/live audience)

Week 2 Begin Date: 22 Jul 2019

Module/Topic

Haemostasis and protein metabolism/disorders

Chapter

PowerPoint lecture notes with references (provided in the unit Moodle site)

Baynes 4th Ed Ch 7 & 19; 5th Ed Ch 15 & 40-41

Events and Submissions/Topic

Lecture content pre-recorded.  Timetabled tutorial (ISL/ECHO360/live audience)

Week 3 Begin Date: 29 Jul 2019

Module/Topic

Protein metabolism, disorders and purine metabolism

Chapter

PowerPoint lecture notes with references (provided in the unit Moodle site)

Baynes 4th Ed Ch 19 & 31; 5th Ed Ch 15 & 16

Bishop 7th Ed Ch 12

Events and Submissions/Topic

Lecture content pre-recorded.  Timetabled tutorial (ISL/ECHO360/live audience)

Week 4 Begin Date: 05 Aug 2019

Module/Topic

Carbohydrates during health and disease, diabetes and Lipids 1

Chapter

PowerPoint lecture notes with references (provided in the unit Moodle site)

Baynes 4th Ed Ch 17, 18 & 21; 5th Ed Ch 31, 32 & 33

Bishop 7th Ed Ch 14 & 15

Events and Submissions/Topic

Lecture content pre-recorded.  Timetabled tutorial (ISL/ECHO360/live audience)

Week 5 Begin Date: 12 Aug 2019

Module/Topic

Lipids 2 and diagnostic enzymology

Chapter

Powerpoint lecture notes with references (provided in the unit Moodle site)

Baynes 4th Ed Ch 10 & 20; 5th Ed Ch 30 & 37

Bishop 7th Ed Ch 26 & 28

Events and Submissions/Topic

Lecture content pre-recorded.  Timetabled tutorial (ISL/ECHO360/live audience)

Vacation Week Begin Date: 19 Aug 2019

Module/Topic

Mid-term vacation (Term 1 2019 deferred and supplementary examinations scheduled during this week)

Chapter

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 6 Begin Date: 26 Aug 2019

Module/Topic

Liver function, blood gas and pH

Chapter

PowerPoint lecture notes with references

Baynes 4th Ed Ch 25 & 30; 5th Ed Ch 34 & 36

Bishop 7th Ed Ch 17 & 25

Events and Submissions/Topic

Lecture content pre-recorded.  Timetabled tutorial (ISL/ECHO360/live audience)


Written Assessment - Clinical Case Study Due: Week 6 Friday (30 Aug 2019) 11:55 pm AEST
Week 7 Begin Date: 02 Sep 2019

Module/Topic

Renal function and failure, electrolytes

Chapter

PowerPoint lecture notes with references (provided in the unit Moodle site)

Baynes 4th Ed Ch 23-24; 5th Ed Ch 35

Events and Submissions/Topic

Lecture content pre-recorded.  Timetabled tutorial (ISL/ECHO360/live audience)

Week 8 Begin Date: 09 Sep 2019

Module/Topic

Hormones and tumour markers and residential school option #1

Chapter

Powerpoint lecture notes with references (provided in the unit Moodle site)

Baynes 4th Ed Ch 39; 5th Ed Ch 27-28

Bishop 7th Ed Ch 20-24

Events and Submissions/Topic

Lecture content pre-recorded.  Timetabled tutorial (ISL/ECHO360/live audience)

Residential school option #1 (Monday-Tuesday 9th-10th September)

Week 9 Begin Date: 16 Sep 2019

Module/Topic

No lectures - revision/residential school option #2

Chapter

Events and Submissions/Topic

Residential school option #2 (Monday-Tuesday 16th-17th September)

Week 10 Begin Date: 23 Sep 2019

Module/Topic

No lectures - revision

Chapter

Events and Submissions/Topic


Week 11 Begin Date: 30 Sep 2019

Module/Topic

No lectures - revision

Chapter

Events and Submissions/Topic

Practical and Written Assessment Due: Week 11 Friday (4 Oct 2019) 11:55 pm AEST
Week 12 Begin Date: 07 Oct 2019

Module/Topic

No lectures - revision

Chapter

Events and Submissions/Topic


Review/Exam Week Begin Date: 14 Oct 2019

Module/Topic

No lectures - revision

Chapter

Events and Submissions/Topic


Exam Week Begin Date: 21 Oct 2019

Module/Topic

No lecture - revision

Chapter

Events and Submissions/Topic

Term Specific Information

Your teaching team for T2 2019

Your unit coordinators are Dr Andrew Fenning and Wayne Pederick who, together with a team of laboratory and postgraduate support staff will manage the different components of the unit. You can contact the teaching team using the forum on the unit's Moodle site, via phone (07 4923 2568 for Andrew or 07 4930 9305 for Wayne) or email by (a.fenning@cqu.edu.au or w.pederick@cqu.edu.au).


The unit

BMSC12010 Clinical Biochemistry fits into your course as a direct follow-on to BMSC11005 (Foundations of Biochemistry) and provides important scaffolding to third level (advanced) units such as BMSC13002 Advanced Clinical Biochemistry, BMSC13009 Immunology and BMSC13010 Pharmacology. The unit also synthesises important elements covered in your other 1st and 2nd level units such as Measurement and Evaluation, Anatomy and Physiology, Pathophysiology and Cardiorespiratory - so don't forget what you have already studied! BMSC12010 is a core unit in several courses, including:

  • Bachelor of Medical Science (CG93)
  • Bachelor of Medical Laboratory Science (CL10)
  • Bachelor of Paramedic Sciences (CG95)
  • Bachelor of Science (CU18)


Expectations - boldly go......(where others have gone before!)

Despite the rumoured tough nature of this unit that does the rounds (yes - the unit contains new content and the expectation of integrating elements and it has the eye rolling "biochemistry" in the title) the class always raises the bar! This is illustrated by the excellent success rates (89% of students passed) and the percentage of students who achieved a HD (21%), D (24%) or C (27%) grades during Term 2 2018 and similarly during Term 2 2019 (91% of students passed (HD = 20%; D = 23%; C = 32.%; P= 14%)). In an analysis (EasyConnect data - tracks your interaction with Moodle) of why a student achieved a HD, D or C grade compared to a P or F grade the answer appears to be linked to your meaningful engagement. HD students interact with the material almost twice as much as a P student (EasyConnect). That is a significant difference in the level of engagement and potential for learning!


Delivery and study commitment

This unit has all of the lecture content presented over the first 8 weeks of the unit schedule/unit Moodle site. These 8 weeks of content delivery will have an associated recorded ECHO360 lecture (and PowerPoint file) and be available from week 1 of term delivered in a weekly fashion typically of 2.5-3 hours in length. The PowerPoint file and lecture content are the primary delivery medium for this unit and will be where the examination questions are drawn from. There will be a live weekly tutorial (ECHO360/Zoom/in class) to supported the pre-recorded lecture content. The final 4 weeks of the unit schedule have no content delivery - this has been intentionally left free to allow for consolidation and self managed/directed study and completion of any remaining assessment items. As the examination forms an integral component of your tasks during the term, you should use this time to prepare for this item. You still have the same amount of content/contact time as other units - it has just been designed and delivered in a topic format of 8 weeks x 3 hours rather than 12 weeks x 2 hours.

As with other Units - the design is such that students are expected to spend on average 10-12.5 hours per week (150 hours total) on associated study activities for this Unit. As a rough "time budget estimate" the approximate guide for your study per assessment is as follows:

  • Assessment item 1 Case study - 20 hours
  • Assessment item 2 Practical report - 30 hours
  • Assessment item 3 Examination - 100 hours
  • 150 hours total

If you consider the lecture content and other activities will total approximately 40 hours, your own study needs to account for the rest (110 hours). Assessment items 1 and 2 have elements which are "time on task" activities to also contribute to the weekly content and hence the generic exam study for this Unit. Use these details as a guide because your study journey and requirements are unique (some students may require less or more hours than suggested to pass).


Practical/Residential School information

If you are enrolled in the Medical Science (CG93), Medical Laboratory Science (CL10) or Science (CU18) courses it is a course level learning and skill requirement for compulsory attendance at the residential school. There are two potential options to attend both in Rockhampton - you only need to choose/attend one of these options. Review your timetable information in the Handbook. If you are enrolled in the Paramedic Science (CG95) course, it is not compulsory for your course learning outcomes to attend the residential school (you can still attend if you wish however consider your study load). Regardless of the course you are enrolled in you will still need to complete the assessment item. We will use actual collected data from the residential school classes to complete the practical written assessment item.


Brief assessment overview and tips

  • Assessment item 1 Case study - Dr House styled case study diagnosis covering directed study on important clinical biochemical markers, communication and written expression, synthesis and problem solving and scientific writing/literature appraisal
  • Assessment item 2 Practical report - a mini journal article based on the laboratory data collected during the residential schools covering scientific writing and communication, problem solving, data analysis, basic statistical analysis and critical appraisal of the results and literature
  • Assessment item 3 Examination - content knowledge and problem solving

Make sure you cite correctly and gather sufficient reference materials for the written assessment items and proof your documents well - these were common features which translated to a less than optimal grade.

Assessment Tasks

1 Written Assessment

Assessment Title
Written Assessment - Clinical Case Study

Task Description

In your future profession, you will likely be working in an environment that focuses on the testing, diagnosis and treatment of human disease.  The clinical biochemistry laboratory ensures an accurate diagnosis is developed to help inform the appropriate clinical management of the patient.  This task is a little bit of basic clinical biochemistry and a pinch of clinical diagnosis/medical detective work in a case study format. For those of you familiar with the TV series “House M.D.” this is your opportunity to be a “Dr House”. The task will hopefully provide some “time on task” focussed learning on several important sections of clinical biochemistry. This assessment task covers elements of unit learning outcomes 1, 2, 3 and 5.


Our patient

Edna Notsowell presented to Dr Magoo feeling generally unwell. Edna described a recent significant cramp-like pain and swelling in her lower left leg calf area.  Edna also indicated that she sometimes had mild bone pain, abdominal pain and fatigue.  Dr Magoo's initial examination found Edna to be 68 years old with mild hypertension and a slightly elevated heart rate.  His diagnosis was a pulled muscle and osteoporosis.  Dr Magoo clearly needs your Dr House like skills to help with the diagnosis of Edna's condition and you should explore several possibilities.  Edna was able to produce both previous and current blood analysis data as indicated below:

Edna may have more than one cause for his symptoms with several possibilities. Your task has two parts:

  1. Discuss each biometric/biochemical marker provided under the “clinical measurements” heading below and indicate if a value is outside the typical reference range and what an elevated or decreased reading for each of these markers could indicate (2000 words)
  2. Diagnose Edna's symptoms (combining the “clinical measurements” and patient description) and provide a recommendation on what further tests you would require to confirm your diagnosis if any. You will need to explain your reasoning and your answer will require at least five primary references (original journal articles) (1500 words)

Total 3500 words


Clinical measurements

  • Albumin - June 2018 = 40 g/L; June 2019 = 34 g/L
  • Alpha 1 - June 2018 = 20 g/L; June 2019 = 25 g/L
  • Alpha 2 - June 2018 = 12 g/L; June 2019 = 13 g/L
  • Beta - June 2018 = 11 g/L; June 2019 = 12 g/L
  • Gamma - June 2018 = 4 g/L; June 2019 = 4 g/L
  • eGFR - June 2018 = 65 mls/min; June 2019 = 45 mrs/min
  • Plasma creatinine - June 2018 = 0.8; June 2019 = 1.4 mg/dL
  • BUN - June 2018 = 10 mg/dL; June 2019 = 28 mg/dL
  • PTH - June 2018 = 57 pmol/L; June 2019 = 88 pmol/L
  • Fibrin D-dimer - June 2018 = 25 ug/L; June 2019 = 825 ug/L
  • Calcium - June 2018 = 2.7 mmol/L; June 2019 = 10.4 mmol/L
  • Plasma thrombin time - June 2018 = 10 seconds; June 2019 = 5 seconds
  • Osteocalcin - June 2018 = 6.2 ug/L; June 2019 = 2.9 ug/L
  • TTG IgA - June 2018 = 46 U/mL; June 2019 = 43 U/mL

Where to start/structure?

A suggested layout is as follows -

Part 1 (2000 words)

  • brief introduction paragraph to the assignment and scenario
  • dedicate a paragraph to each of the “clinical measurements” and use textbook referenced content to examine the diagnostic importance of the measurements and what an elevated or decreased reading for each of these markers could indicate

Part 2 (1500 words)

  • written assignment/review format in paragraphs
  • combine the “clinical measurements” and patient symptoms/description to form a rational and supported diagnosis using primary reference material (5 journal articles)
  • clearly state and articulate your diagnosis
  • conclude this section and the assignment with suggestions for Dr Magoo on further testing to correctly confirm Edna’s diagnosis and typical treatments for this condition


Assessment Due Date

Week 6 Friday (30 Aug 2019) 11:55 pm AEST


Return Date to Students

Week 8 Friday (13 Sept 2019)


Weighting
15%

Minimum mark or grade
50%

Assessment Criteria

The case study questions will be out of a total of 50 marks (3500 word limit).  You should consider the following points when developing your assessment task:

  • clarity of expression (spelling and grammar)
  • the inclusion of key facts, accurate up-to-date research (i.e. in the last ten years)
  • correct referencing
  • use of clear and appropriate diagrams

The use of information contained solely within the study or lecture notes will result in the awarding of a passing grade at best. In order to obtain higher marks, information from other sources will be required. Students who use relevant information from other sources in their assignments will be looked upon favourably. The failure to cite references in your assignment will result in your not achieving full value for your efforts. Those students, who plagiarise material from textbooks, Internet sites or other student's work will be subject to the standard plagiarism procedures in operation at CQUniversity (remember that such plagiarism will easily be detected using Turnitin). Please refer to the CQUniversity Library website for correct referencing information. Further details will be available in the Assessment block for this item in the unit Moodle site. Total = 50 marks (3500 words) (to achieve full marks, aim for the following) -

Part 1 (25 marks) (2000 words)

  • correct clinical description of the "Clinical measurements" provided, indicating what a decreased or increased level of each would indicate (one paragraph for each); correctly referenced from either textbook or primary reference material (journal articles); correctly written paragraphs. (20 marks)
  • correctly written and proofed. (5 marks)

Part 2 (25 marks) (1500 words)

  • demonstrated scientific review format with a supported clinical diagnosis (primary reference articles). (15 marks)
  • referencing (contextual use of 5 primary journal articles). (5 marks)
  • written expression and proofing. (5 marks)


Referencing Style

Submission
Online

Learning Outcomes Assessed
  • Describe basic cell signalling, communication and metabolism (breakdown of proteins, fats and carbohydrates under aerobic conditions).
  • Recall, classify and evaluate significant pathological conditions which occur in the human body and their respective biochemical tests and assays.
  • Recall and describe the major functions of a clinical pathology laboratory.
  • Appraise the scientific literature and communicate this knowledge and understanding via scientific writing tasks such as practical reports and case study PBL assessment items.


Graduate Attributes
  • Communication
  • Problem Solving
  • Critical Thinking
  • Information Literacy
  • Ethical practice

2 Practical and Written Assessment

Assessment Title
Practical and Written Assessment

Task Description

Analysis and interpretation of your experimental or treatment findings (both bench and clinical sciences) are essential features of communication in the medical sciences.  The laboratory activities will use "real" collected samples and cover common elements of the clinical biochemistry testing laboratory such as glucose/diabetes testing, cardiovascular markers, liver function tests and drug screening. You will be required to write a report from your choice of selected laboratory experiments (provided to you) in basic scientific journal format (from data collected during the residential schools). Scientific journal format typically contains the following elements:

  • abstract
  • introduction
  • methods
  • results
  • discussion/conclusions
  • limitations/future directions

This task requires you to complete a similar yet abbreviated format that only requires IMRAD (introduction, methods, results and discussion/limitations). This item assess unit learning outcomes 1-5.


Assessment Due Date

Week 11 Friday (4 Oct 2019) 11:55 pm AEST


Return Date to Students

Review/Exam Week Monday (14 Oct 2019)


Weighting
25%

Minimum mark or grade
50%

Assessment Criteria

The practical report will be evaluated in accordance with the detailed marking rubric available in the Assessment item block located in the unit's Moodle site. A brief overview of the assessment criteria are as follows:

Introduction (20 marks): The introduction should be between 500–700 words in length and will provide the reader with sufficient information to understand why this study was performed and also provide any essential background information (with references to journal articles or text books) that is needed for interpretation of the results and discussion. It should conclude with a specific aim of the study. As a general guide—approximately 3–6 paragraphs with important and interesting background information that has been correctly referenced.

Methods (10 marks): There is no need to completely rewrite the methods section in detail. This section should be a brief summary approximately 1-2 paragraphs in length (100-200 words).

Results (20 marks): This section should contain the experimental results in summary form (means/SD), presented in either tables or graphs, not both. It is not enough just to use tables and graphs—you must also state the results referring to the table or figure. All tables and figures must be labelled appropriately. There should be no interpretation of results in this section—just state the results observed! Leave any interpretation to the discussion (100-200 words).

Discussion (20 marks): This section should be between 500-700 words in length and will provide an analysis and interpretation of the results of the study. The implication of your results should be discussed, referring back to statements made in your introduction. Alternative explanations should be offered if necessary especially for negative or unexpected results. Errors could also be discussed.

References (5 marks): All articles or texts referred to in the report need to be listed in this section. Referencing style should follow either the “Vancouver" or "Harvard” style as listed in the unit profile.

Writing Style/Presentation (25 marks): Reports should be clearly written in full sentences (not point form) using correct spelling and grammar. Abbreviations should be explained when first used. Any diagram (added from reference material) must be of good quality and sources must be acknowledged appropriately. The use of scientific writing style is important—peruse scientific journal entries. Of particular importance is clarity of written expression (clearly stated ideas and outcomes). The document should be in scientific journal format with well designed figures, graphs and tables where appropriate.


Clarity of expression (spelling and grammar), the inclusion of key facts, accurate research, correct referencing, and clear diagrams will be important general criteria for performing well in this assessment item (see below for more detailed criteria and in the associated Assessment item block in the unit Moodle site). The use of information contained solely within the study notes/practical support information will result in the awarding of a passing grade at best. In order to obtain higher marks information from other sources will be required. Students who use relevant information from other sources in their reports will be successful. As a guide, between 8 to 10 journal articles should be used! The failure to cite references in your assignments will result in you not achieving full value for your efforts.


Referencing Style

Submission
Online

Learning Outcomes Assessed
  • Describe basic cell signalling, communication and metabolism (breakdown of proteins, fats and carbohydrates under aerobic conditions).
  • Recall, classify and evaluate significant pathological conditions which occur in the human body and their respective biochemical tests and assays.
  • Recall and describe the major functions of a clinical pathology laboratory.
  • Demonstrate competency in biochemical laboratory methods, test and techniques.
  • Appraise the scientific literature and communicate this knowledge and understanding via scientific writing tasks such as practical reports and case study PBL assessment items.


Graduate Attributes
  • Communication
  • Problem Solving
  • Critical Thinking
  • Information Literacy
  • Team Work
  • Information Technology Competence
  • Cross Cultural Competence
  • Ethical practice

Examination

Outline
Complete an invigilated examination

Date
During the examination period, at a CQUniversity examination centre

Weighting
60%

Length
180 minutes

Minimum mark or grade
50%

Details
Dictionary - non-electronic, concise, direct translation only (dictionary must not contain any notes or comments).
Calculator - non-programmable, no text retrieval, silent only
Closed Book
Academic Integrity Statement

As a CQUniversity student you are expected to act honestly in all aspects of your academic work.

Any assessable work undertaken or submitted for review or assessment must be your own work. Assessable work is any type of work you do to meet the assessment requirements in the unit, including draft work submitted for review and feedback and final work to be assessed.

When you use the ideas, words or data of others in your assessment, you must thoroughly and clearly acknowledge the source of this information by using the correct referencing style for your unit. Using others’ work without proper acknowledgement may be considered a form of intellectual dishonesty.

Participating honestly, respectfully, responsibly, and fairly in your university study ensures the CQUniversity qualification you earn will be valued as a true indication of your individual academic achievement and will continue to receive the respect and recognition it deserves.

As a student, you are responsible for reading and following CQUniversity’s policies, including the Student Academic Integrity Policy and Procedure. This policy sets out CQUniversity’s expectations of you to act with integrity, examples of academic integrity breaches to avoid, the processes used to address alleged breaches of academic integrity, and potential penalties.

What is a breach of academic integrity?

A breach of academic integrity includes but is not limited to plagiarism, self-plagiarism, collusion, cheating, contract cheating, and academic misconduct. The Student Academic Integrity Policy and Procedure defines what these terms mean and gives examples.

Why is academic integrity important?

A breach of academic integrity may result in one or more penalties, including suspension or even expulsion from the University. It can also have negative implications for student visas and future enrolment at CQUniversity or elsewhere. Students who engage in contract cheating also risk being blackmailed by contract cheating services.

Where can I get assistance?

For academic advice and guidance, the Academic Learning Centre (ALC) can support you in becoming confident in completing assessments with integrity and of high standard.

What can you do to act with integrity?