CQUniversity Unit Profile
CHIR11001 Foundations of Chiropractic Practice 1
Foundations of Chiropractic Practice 1
All details in this unit profile for CHIR11001 have been officially approved by CQUniversity and represent a learning partnership between the University and you (our student).
The information will not be changed unless absolutely necessary and any change will be clearly indicated by an approved correction included in the profile.
General Information

Overview

This unit offers you an introduction to the principles and practice of chiropractic, within the context of the Australian health care system. The overall structure of the Foundations of Chiropractic Practice 1 unit covers integrated material on topics to prepare you for progressively more complex health-related units in the course. As such, it commences with etymology (medical terminology); basic musculoskeletal assessment protocols; postural observation and analysis; movement (active and passive ranges of motion); psychomotor palpation skills to spinal and peripheral anatomy landmarks; elementary biomechanics; history of manipulation and founding philosophical principles of chiropractic.

Details

Career Level: Undergraduate
Unit Level: Level 1
Credit Points: 6
Student Contribution Band: 8
Fraction of Full-Time Student Load: 0.125

Pre-requisites or Co-requisites

Co-requisite: BMSC11001 Human Body Systems 1

Important note: Students enrolled in a subsequent unit who failed their pre-requisite unit, should drop the subsequent unit before the census date or within 10 working days of Fail grade notification. Students who do not drop the unit in this timeframe cannot later drop the unit without academic and financial liability. See details in the Assessment Policy and Procedure (Higher Education Coursework).

Offerings For Term 1 - 2019

Brisbane
Mackay
Sydney

Attendance Requirements

All on-campus students are expected to attend scheduled classes – in some units, these classes are identified as a mandatory (pass/fail) component and attendance is compulsory. International students, on a student visa, must maintain a full time study load and meet both attendance and academic progress requirements in each study period (satisfactory attendance for International students is defined as maintaining at least an 80% attendance record).

Class and Assessment Overview

Recommended Student Time Commitment

Each 6-credit Undergraduate unit at CQUniversity requires an overall time commitment of an average of 12.5 hours of study per week, making a total of 150 hours for the unit.

Class Timetable

Bundaberg, Cairns, Emerald, Gladstone, Mackay, Rockhampton, Townsville
Adelaide, Brisbane, Melbourne, Perth, Sydney

Assessment Overview

1. On-campus Activity
Weighting: Pass/Fail
2. Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs)
Weighting: 60%
3. Examination
Weighting: 40%

Assessment Grading

This is a graded unit: your overall grade will be calculated from the marks or grades for each assessment task, based on the relative weightings shown in the table above. You must obtain an overall mark for the unit of at least 50%, or an overall grade of ‘pass’ in order to pass the unit. If any ‘pass/fail’ tasks are shown in the table above they must also be completed successfully (‘pass’ grade). You must also meet any minimum mark requirements specified for a particular assessment task, as detailed in the ‘assessment task’ section (note that in some instances, the minimum mark for a task may be greater than 50%). Consult the University’s Grades and Results Policy for more details of interim results and final grades.

Previous Student Feedback

Feedback, Recommendations and Responses

Every unit is reviewed for enhancement each year. At the most recent review, the following staff and student feedback items were identified and recommendations were made.

Feedback from Direct student feedback, both in classroom, tutorial and with Have Your Say.

Feedback

The faculty is aware of the need to strengthen the correlation with learning resources and learning outcomes. Despite the improvements developed for 2018, there still have been some occasions where there is a disconnect. Further reflection will benefit delivery with more integration between this unit, others in first year, and with the Foundations track within this course.

Recommendation

Continue with reflection and subsequent standardisation of tutorial, practical and rubrics across the campuses. Particular attention will be given to expected outcomes from the various activities.

Unit Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this unit, you will be able to:
  1. Define the principles and practice of chiropractic and discuss how philosophical chiropractic approaches are applied in a modern health paradigm
  2. Describe biomechanical principles relevant to chiropractic practice
  3. Perform and interpret musculoskeletal assessment tasks using postural observation, range of motion measurements and static palpation of spinal and axial landmarks

Not applicable

Alignment of Learning Outcomes, Assessment and Graduate Attributes
N/A Level
Introductory Level
Intermediate Level
Graduate Level
Professional Level
Advanced Level

Alignment of Assessment Tasks to Learning Outcomes

Assessment Tasks Learning Outcomes
1 2 3
1 - On-campus Activity - 0%
2 - Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs) - 60%
3 - Examination - 40%

Alignment of Graduate Attributes to Learning Outcomes

Graduate Attributes Learning Outcomes
1 2 3
1 - Communication
2 - Problem Solving
3 - Critical Thinking
4 - Information Literacy
5 - Team Work
6 - Information Technology Competence
7 - Cross Cultural Competence
8 - Ethical practice
9 - Social Innovation

Alignment of Assessment Tasks to Graduate Attributes

Assessment Tasks Graduate Attributes
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
1 - On-campus Activity - 0%
2 - Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs) - 60%
3 - Examination - 40%
Textbooks and Resources

Textbooks

Prescribed

Evidence Informed Muscle Manual 2nd Edition (2018)

Authors: Nikita A Vizniak
Professional Health Systems Inc
Canada
ISBN: 978-0-9732742-2-6
Binding: Spiral
Supplementary

Evidence Informed Muscle Manual Workbook/Lab Manual 1st Edition (2015)

Authors: Nikita A Vizniak
Professional Health Systems Inc
Canada
ISBN: 978-0-9732742-3-3
Binding: Paperback

Additional Textbook Information

eBooks can be purchased from the publisher.

If you prefer a paper text, you can purchase from the CQUni Bookshop here: http://bookshop.cqu.edu.au (search on the Unit code)

IT Resources

You will need access to the following IT resources:
  • CQUniversity Student Email
  • Internet
  • Unit Website (Moodle)
Referencing Style

All submissions for this unit must use the referencing style: American Psychological Association 6th Edition (APA 6th edition)

For further information, see the Assessment Tasks.

Teaching Contacts
David Hannah Unit Coordinator
d.hannah@cqu.edu.au
Schedule
Week 1 Begin Date: 11 Mar 2019

Module/Topic

Lecture: Introduction to Foundations of Chiropractic Practice 1 and

expectations; Introduction to Ethics of Touching; Professionalism


Practical:  Introduction to Lab procedures


Chapter

Read articles:

Stone, J Respecting Professional Boundaries; What CAM practitioners need to know, Contemporary Therapies in Medicine (2008), 14, pages 2-7

Schiff, E et al, Touching Ethics: Assessing the applicability of ethical rules for safe touch in CAM – Outcomes. Complementary Therapies in Medicine (2011) 19, pages 12 – 18


Events and Submissions/Topic

You will be given opportunities to observe patient encounters in the CQU Chiropractic clinics (currently requesting 3). The necessary documentation, with expectations will be provided to you during the first 2-3 weeks of the term. These are not scheduled events, but will require you to contact your closest clinic for arrangements that are mutually beneficial.

Week 2 Begin Date: 18 Mar 2019

Module/Topic

Lecture: History of Chiropractic;  Biomechanics of Anatomical and

Body Planes; Body Regions; and Spinal Curvatures


Practical: Spinal Ranges of Motion (ROM) using a goniometer with

Record Documentation

Chapter

Read from Vizniak, Muscle Manual 2nd Edition: pages 3-9; 20-24; 84-87; 126-128; 161-163


Observe ROM Videos supplied on Moodle.

Events and Submissions/Topic

On-Campus activity involving various aspects of previous week's material.

Week 3 Begin Date: 25 Mar 2019

Module/Topic

Lecture:  Surface Anatomy of the Upper and Lower Limb;  Ranges of

Motion of Upper and Lower Limb ; History of Chiropractic (contd);


Practical:  Upper and Lower Limb ROM and record documentation

Chapter

Read from Vizniak, Muscle Manual, pages 11; 195-197; 199; 237-239;

295; 297-299; 357-358

Observe ROM Videos supplied on Moodle.

Events and Submissions/Topic

On-Campus activity involving various aspects of previous week's material.

Week 4 Begin Date: 01 Apr 2019

Module/Topic

Lecture: Surface Anatomy of the Spine, Trunk, Chest and Limbs


Practical:  Surface Anatomy Spinal and Limbs

Chapter

Read from Vizniak, Muscle Manual, pages 11

Observe ROM Videos supplied on Moodle site.

Events and Submissions/Topic

On-Campus activity involving various aspects of previous week's material.

Week 5 Begin Date: 08 Apr 2019

Module/Topic

Lecture  Postural Analysis and Assessment


Practical:  Postural Examination and record documentation.

Chapter

Read from Vizniak Muscle Manual pages vii-ix


Recommended: Bergmann text, Posture Chapter 3, pages 55-56 ;

Figure 3-14 and Table 3-2


Events and Submissions/Topic

On-Campus activity involving various aspects of previous week's material.

Vacation Week Begin Date: 15 Apr 2019

Module/Topic

Chapter

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 6 Begin Date: 22 Apr 2019

Module/Topic

Lecture: Introduction to Palpation Skills; Bony Landmark Definitions;

Cervical Spine Bony anatomy


Practical:  Surface palpation of the cervical spine. Revision for first

OSCE later in the week.

Chapter

Read from Vizniak, Muscle Manual, pages 11; 80


Recommended: Read from Bergmann text, Posture Chapter 3, pages

65-67

Events and Submissions/Topic

On-Campus activity involving various aspects of previous week's

material along with revision for mid-term OSCE, April 26, 2019.



Week 7 Begin Date: 29 Apr 2019

Module/Topic

Lecture: Thoracic Spine Bony anatomy; Introduction to Australian

Chiropractic History


Practical: Surface palpation of the thoracic spine.

Chapter

Read from Vizniak, Muscle Manual, pages 118-119


Read article:

Bolton, S, Chiropractic Education in Australia: A Short History of Its

Emergence and Development', Chiropractic journal of Australia

(2010) 40, pages 88-90



Events and Submissions/Topic

On-Campus activity involving various aspects of previous week's material.

Week 8 Begin Date: 06 May 2019

Module/Topic

Lecture: Lumbopelvic Bony anatomy; Importance of Chiropractic

Philosophy


Practical: Bony landmarks and anatomy of the lumbopelvic region;

Surface palpation of the lumbopelvic spine.

Chapter

Read from Vizniak, N. Muscle Manual, page 154, “Lumbopelvic Bones”

Events and Submissions/Topic

On-Campus activity involving various aspects of previous week's material.

Week 9 Begin Date: 13 May 2019

Module/Topic

Lecture: Upper Limb bony anatomy; History of Chiropractic Science


Practical: Surface palpation of the upper limb.

Chapter

Read from Vizniak, Muscle Manual, pages 188; 228 



Events and Submissions/Topic

On-Campus activity involving various aspects of previous week's material.

Week 10 Begin Date: 20 May 2019

Module/Topic

Lecture: Lower Limb Bony Anatomy; Chiropractic Across the World

and the Role of Chiropractic in Today's Australian Society


Practical: Surface palpation of the lower limb.

Chapter

Read from Vizniak, Muscle Manual, pages 286; 348-350


Recommended: Bergmann, T, Chiropractic Technique, Principles and

Procedures, 3rd Edition (2011), Guidelines Chapter 1 pages 8-10

Events and Submissions/Topic

On-Campus activity involving various aspects of previous week's material.

Week 11 Begin Date: 27 May 2019

Module/Topic

Lecture: None


Practical: Revision in preparation for Final OSCE.


Chapter

Read article:

Schneider, M, Spine Care as a Framework for the Chiropractic Identity, Journal of Chiropractic Humanities (2016), Volume 23, Number 1 pages 14-20

Events and Submissions/Topic

On-Campus activity involving various aspects of previous week's material.


On-Campus Activity Due: Week 11 Friday (31 May 2019) 5:00 pm AEST
Week 12 Begin Date: 03 Jun 2019

Module/Topic

Lecture: None


Practical: Final OSCE - scheduled during last practical lab session for

week 12.

Chapter

None

Events and Submissions/Topic

FINAL OSCE: FRIDAY JUNE 7, 2019


Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE's) Due: Week 12 Friday (7 June 2019) 1:00 pm AEST
Review/Exam Week Begin Date: 10 Jun 2019

Module/Topic

Chapter

Events and Submissions/Topic

Exam Week Begin Date: 17 Jun 2019

Module/Topic

Chapter

Events and Submissions/Topic

Begin Date: 24 Jun 2019

Module/Topic

Chapter

Events and Submissions/Topic

Term Specific Information

BNE Dawn Dane (07) 3023 4271 with tutors Iris Tan, Barry Draper.

SYD Dean Innis (02) 9324 5025 with tutors David Floro, Chris Jolliffe.


Assessment Tasks

1 On-campus Activity

Assessment Title
On-Campus Activity

Task Description

The on-campus activities in this unit will help prepare you for subsequent units in your chiropractic degree. As such, you will receive ongoing feedback with the opportunity to work with the unit coordinator and/or tutors, as well as classmates, to develop your key chiropractic skills. 

Preparation, study and organisational skills are required of both successful students and chiropractic professionals throughout your career, therefore there will maybe tasks that you must complete BEFORE these on-campus activities are delivered. The weekly on-campus activities will vary in requirements and expectations. Each one will be based on material from the previous or current week's lectures.  It is essential that you review the material.


Assessment Due Date

Week 11 Friday (31 May 2019) 5:00 pm AEST

Last on-campus activity, requiring attendance, is scheduled in week 11 so needs to be completed by the end of that week and handed to the tutor.


Return Date to Students

Week 12 Friday (7 June 2019)

These activities are formative in nature and will be listed as "pass/fail" and can be accessed via Moodle.


Weighting
Pass/Fail

Minimum mark or grade
PASS. You will be required to have a minimum of 80% completion of on-campus activities.

Assessment Criteria

Activities will be reviewed/discussed in class thus providing feedback. You will be assessed on a pass/fail basis for the weekly activities. Each activity signed off on the on-campus activity form will be submitted to the tutor after the class.  At the conclusion of the term, students will be expected to have received a passing grade, in at least 8 weekly activities, in order to receive a 'pass' for this assessment overall.


Referencing Style

Submission

No submission method provided.


Learning Outcomes Assessed
  • Define the principles and practice of chiropractic and discuss how philosophical chiropractic approaches are applied in a modern health paradigm
  • Describe biomechanical principles relevant to chiropractic practice
  • Perform and interpret musculoskeletal assessment tasks using postural observation, range of motion measurements and static palpation of spinal and axial landmarks


Graduate Attributes
  • Communication
  • Problem Solving
  • Team Work

2 Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs)

Assessment Title
Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE's)

Task Description

In practice, the chiropractor is required to combine a variety of clinical skills; all these techniques must be mastered. The objective structured clinical exam (OSCE) in CHIR11001, is made of a single station (Mid-Term) to multiple stations (Final). Each station could require the student to complete or demonstrate appropriate consent, hygiene, professionalism and applying various technical aspects over a specified time period, including reading/planning time prior to the actual commencement of the assessment task(s). There will be a mid-term exam (week 6) as well as a final exam in week 12. The Mid-Term OSCE will have a value of 20% and the final practical test valued at 40%. The exact duration of each station will be determined and announced at a later date, but for the mid-term OSCE, the tasks should generally be completed within 4 minutes and the entire final OSCE should generally be 3-4 minutes per station.

Mid-Term OSCE - Week 6

Station 1: You will be required to perform tasks to demonstrate competence in performing a correct approach or technique, with appropriate patient handling.

1. Postural analysis (assessing 6 items as a minimum).

2. Spinal Range of Motion (ROM) assessment, using goniometer OR Extremity Range of Motion (ROM) assessment, using goniometer.

FINAL OSCE - Week 12

Station 1 Postural Analysis: You will be required to demonstrate competence in performing a correct approach or technique, with appropriate patient handling. 

1. You will be required to assess 10 items as a minimum of a mock patient postural evaluation.

Station 2 Spinal: You will be required to demonstrate competence in performing a correct approach or technique, with appropriate patient handling and being able to correlate your findings by sharing them with the examiner.

1. Location of specific spinal structures (bony landmarks).

2. Spinal Range of Motion assessment, using goniometer.

The tasks will be selected randomly according to a series of composed station cards.

Station 3 Peripheral: You will be required to demonstrate competence in performing a correct approach or technique, with appropriate patient handling and being able to correlate your findings by sharing them with the examiner.

1. Location of specific peripheral structures (bony landmarks).

2. Extremity Range of Motion assessment, using goniometer.

The tasks will be selected randomly according to a series of composed station cards.

Please note:

Each station is timed and you will have the set time to complete the station; therefore if a station is not completed within the allocated time, the practical element will be stopped and you will be marked based on your performance to that point.

The assessment will be recorded using a video camera to enable moderation, however, these recordings will not routinely be available for student feedback.  Direct feedback can be received from the unit coordinator or the tutors.


Assessment Due Date

Week 12 Friday (7 June 2019) 1:00 pm AEST

The practical test will be held on campus as close to the scheduled time for this unit, but can be extended to accommodate the examination without rushing through it. The test will be held in the practical room.


Return Date to Students

Review/Exam Week Tuesday (11 June 2019)

Non-endorsed results can be accessed via Moodle Gradebooks but only until immediately before the written examination, at which time it will no longer be viewed. The OSCE results will be released at the same time as the final written examination.


Weighting
60%

Minimum mark or grade
50%. You will need to obtain this minimum percentage on the practical portion in order to pass this unit.

Assessment Criteria

Mid-Term OSCE Assessment Criteria:

You will need to demonstrate basic competence in evaluating postural evaluation as well as spine and peripheral joint ranges of motion, using a goniometer.
Your performance will be graded, using a marking rubric, according to the following: introduction; inspection and postural analysis (viewed from two directions); active and passive ranges of motion (in all degrees of freedom) with demonstration of use of a goniometer on one active range of motion of your choice; patient handling; technical performance and the examiner's overall impression.

Final OSCE Assessment Criteria:

You will need to demonstrate basic competence in psychomotor skills expected at an introductory level in an applied context; evaluating postural evaluation as well as spine and peripheral joint ranges of motion, static palpation of spinal and peripheral bony landmarks and muscle surfaces.

Your performance will be graded, using a marking rubric, according to the following: introduction; inspection and postural analysis (viewed from two directions); active and passive ranges of motion (in all degrees of freedom); demonstration of a combination of eight (8) bony landmarks and surface muscle structures (both spinal and peripheral); patient handling; technical performance and the examiner's overall impression.
 


Referencing Style

Submission

No submission method provided.


Learning Outcomes Assessed
  • Perform and interpret musculoskeletal assessment tasks using postural observation, range of motion measurements and static palpation of spinal and axial landmarks


Graduate Attributes
  • Communication
  • Problem Solving
  • Ethical practice

Examination

Outline
Complete an invigilated examination

Date
During the examination period, at a CQUniversity examination centre

Weighting
40%

Length
120 minutes

Minimum mark or grade
50%. You will need to obtain this minimum percentage on the written portion in order to pass this unit. Further information can be found in Moodle.

Details
Dictionary - non-electronic, concise, direct translation only (dictionary must not contain any notes or comments).
Closed Book
Academic Integrity Statement

As a CQUniversity student you are expected to act honestly in all aspects of your academic work.

Any assessable work undertaken or submitted for review or assessment must be your own work. Assessable work is any type of work you do to meet the assessment requirements in the unit, including draft work submitted for review and feedback and final work to be assessed.

When you use the ideas, words or data of others in your assessment, you must thoroughly and clearly acknowledge the source of this information by using the correct referencing style for your unit. Using others’ work without proper acknowledgement may be considered a form of intellectual dishonesty.

Participating honestly, respectfully, responsibly, and fairly in your university study ensures the CQUniversity qualification you earn will be valued as a true indication of your individual academic achievement and will continue to receive the respect and recognition it deserves.

As a student, you are responsible for reading and following CQUniversity’s policies, including the Student Academic Integrity Policy and Procedure. This policy sets out CQUniversity’s expectations of you to act with integrity, examples of academic integrity breaches to avoid, the processes used to address alleged breaches of academic integrity, and potential penalties.

What is a breach of academic integrity?

A breach of academic integrity includes but is not limited to plagiarism, self-plagiarism, collusion, cheating, contract cheating, and academic misconduct. The Student Academic Integrity Policy and Procedure defines what these terms mean and gives examples.

Why is academic integrity important?

A breach of academic integrity may result in one or more penalties, including suspension or even expulsion from the University. It can also have negative implications for student visas and future enrolment at CQUniversity or elsewhere. Students who engage in contract cheating also risk being blackmailed by contract cheating services.

Where can I get assistance?

For academic advice and guidance, the Academic Learning Centre (ALC) can support you in becoming confident in completing assessments with integrity and of high standard.

What can you do to act with integrity?