CQUniversity Unit Profile
CRIM11003 Indigenous Australians and the Criminal Justice System
Indigenous Australians and the Criminal Justice System
All details in this unit profile for CRIM11003 have been officially approved by CQUniversity and represent a learning partnership between the University and you (our student).
The information will not be changed unless absolutely necessary and any change will be clearly indicated by an approved correction included in the profile.
General Information

Overview

This foundational unit provides you with the knowledge and skills to work effectively within Indigenous contexts of the Criminal Justice System. This unit responds to the over-representation of Indigenous Australians within the criminal justice system, as offenders and as victims. You will discuss the impact of invasion and economic disenfranchisement on individuals and communities and explain systemic responses in policing, courts and corrections. Through the curriculum, you will be equipped with the skills and expertise to work toward sustainable societies that respond to inclusiveness based on respect for human rights, the rule of law and good governance. This unit explores the position of Indigenous Australians before the Western justice system and provides you with the attributes that allow you to be an active citizen engaged in reconciliation and social justice for Indigenous Australians.

Details

Career Level: Undergraduate
Unit Level: Level 1
Credit Points: 6
Student Contribution Band: 10
Fraction of Full-Time Student Load: 0.125

Pre-requisites or Co-requisites

There are no requisites for this unit.

Important note: Students enrolled in a subsequent unit who failed their pre-requisite unit, should drop the subsequent unit before the census date or within 10 working days of Fail grade notification. Students who do not drop the unit in this timeframe cannot later drop the unit without academic and financial liability. See details in the Assessment Policy and Procedure (Higher Education Coursework).

Offerings For Term 2 - 2022

Online

Attendance Requirements

All on-campus students are expected to attend scheduled classes – in some units, these classes are identified as a mandatory (pass/fail) component and attendance is compulsory. International students, on a student visa, must maintain a full time study load and meet both attendance and academic progress requirements in each study period (satisfactory attendance for International students is defined as maintaining at least an 80% attendance record).

Class and Assessment Overview

Recommended Student Time Commitment

Each 6-credit Undergraduate unit at CQUniversity requires an overall time commitment of an average of 12.5 hours of study per week, making a total of 150 hours for the unit.

Class Timetable

Bundaberg, Cairns, Emerald, Gladstone, Mackay, Rockhampton, Townsville
Adelaide, Brisbane, Melbourne, Perth, Sydney

Assessment Overview

1. Learning logs / diaries / Journal / log books
Weighting: 30%
2. Online Quiz(zes)
Weighting: 20%
3. Written Assessment
Weighting: 50%

Assessment Grading

This is a graded unit: your overall grade will be calculated from the marks or grades for each assessment task, based on the relative weightings shown in the table above. You must obtain an overall mark for the unit of at least 50%, or an overall grade of ‘pass’ in order to pass the unit. If any ‘pass/fail’ tasks are shown in the table above they must also be completed successfully (‘pass’ grade). You must also meet any minimum mark requirements specified for a particular assessment task, as detailed in the ‘assessment task’ section (note that in some instances, the minimum mark for a task may be greater than 50%). Consult the University’s Grades and Results Policy for more details of interim results and final grades.

Previous Student Feedback

Feedback, Recommendations and Responses

Every unit is reviewed for enhancement each year. At the most recent review, the following staff and student feedback items were identified and recommendations were made.

Feedback from Have your say

Feedback

Organisation of material can be improved

Recommendation

Learning materials are revised before each term that a unit is taught in. Special attention will be paid to giving clearer signposts through material.

Feedback from Have your say

Feedback

Assessment needs further explanation

Recommendation

Resources will be created to provide additional help with assessment.

Unit Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this unit, you will be able to:
  1. Critique the connections between the criminal justice system, health, mental health and poverty, particularly for Indigenous Australian youth
  2. Critically reflect on current strategies that aim to improve relations between Indigenous Australians and criminal justice agencies
  3. Discuss the impact of historical and contemporary approaches to criminal justice on Indigenous Australians
  4. Discuss theories of colonialism and post-colonialism as they pertain to contemporary Australian justice issues
  5. Communicate using fundamental Indigenous Australian cultural competency.

No external accreditation is relevant to this award.

Alignment of Learning Outcomes, Assessment and Graduate Attributes
N/A Level
Introductory Level
Intermediate Level
Graduate Level
Professional Level
Advanced Level

Alignment of Assessment Tasks to Learning Outcomes

Assessment Tasks Learning Outcomes
1 2 3 4 5
1 - Written Assessment - 50%
2 - Online Quiz(zes) - 20%
3 - Learning logs / diaries / Journal / log books - 30%

Alignment of Graduate Attributes to Learning Outcomes

Graduate Attributes Learning Outcomes
1 2 3 4 5
1 - Communication
2 - Problem Solving
3 - Critical Thinking
4 - Information Literacy
5 - Team Work
6 - Information Technology Competence
7 - Cross Cultural Competence
8 - Ethical practice
9 - Social Innovation
10 - Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Cultures

Alignment of Assessment Tasks to Graduate Attributes

Assessment Tasks Graduate Attributes
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
1 - Written Assessment - 50%
2 - Online Quiz(zes) - 20%
3 - Learning logs / diaries / Journal / log books - 30%
Textbooks and Resources

Textbooks

There are no required textbooks.

IT Resources

You will need access to the following IT resources:
  • CQUniversity Student Email
  • Internet
  • Unit Website (Moodle)
Referencing Style

All submissions for this unit must use the referencing style: American Psychological Association 7th Edition (APA 7th edition)

For further information, see the Assessment Tasks.

Teaching Contacts
Kelsey Buchanan Unit Coordinator
k.e.buchanan@cqu.edu.au
Schedule
Week 1 Begin Date: 11 Jul 2022

Module/Topic

'Educate Yourself'

Chapter

Cunneen, C. & Tauri, J. (2016). Introduction. In Indigenous Criminology, Policy Press, Bristol, pp. 1-22. https://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/cqu/reader.action?docID=4584969&ppg=12

Hobbs, H. & Williams, G. (2018). The Noongar Settlement: Australia's First Treaty. Sydney Law Review 40(1), 1-38. https://www8.austlii.edu.au/cgi-bin/viewdoc/au/journals/SydLRev/2018/1.html

Uluru Statement from the Heart (2017). https://ulurustatement.org/the-statement/view-the-statement/

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 2 Begin Date: 18 Jul 2022

Module/Topic

Indigenous Australians and Colonialism

Chapter

Burke, H., Barker, B., Wallis, L., Craig, S. & Combo, M. (2020). Betwixt and Between: Trauma, Survival and the Aboriginal Troopers of the Queensland Native Mounted Police. Journal of Genocide Research 22(3), 317-33. https://doi-org.ezproxy.cqu.edu.au/10.1080/14623528.2020.1735147

Nayar, P.K. (2015). Discovery. In The Postcolonial Studies Dictionary, John Wiley & Sons, UK, pp. 51-52. https://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/cqu/reader.action?docID=2008059&ppg=65

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 3 Begin Date: 25 Jul 2022

Module/Topic

Legal Encounters

Chapter

Behrendt, L. (2021). Chapter 26: Ten Key Legal Decisions (Plus One to Keep an Eye On). In Indigenous Australia for Dummies, John Wiley & Sons, Milton, pp. 469-475. https://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/cqu/reader.action?docID=6498786&ppg=489

Lydon, J. (2017). Anti-slavery in Australia: Picturing the 1838 Myall Creek Massacre. History Compass 15(5). https://doi-org.ezproxy.cqu.edu.au/10.1111/hic3.12330

Events and Submissions/Topic

Workbook #1 due Monday 25/7 5:00pm AEST

Week 4 Begin Date: 01 Aug 2022

Module/Topic

Racism, Missions and the NT Intervention

Chapter

Blagg, H. & Anthony, T. (2019). Postcolonial Criminology: “The Past Isn’t Over…” In Decolonising Criminology: Imagining Justice in a Postcolonial World, Palgrave Macmillan, pp. 31-54. https://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/cqu/reader.action?docID=5983950&ppg=47

Wild, R. & Anderson, P. (2007). Overview. Ampe Akelyernemane Meke Mekarle ‘Little Children are Sacred’: Report of the Northern Territory Board of Inquiry into the Protection of Aboriginal Children from Sexual Abuse, pp. 12-18. https://humanrights.gov.au/sites/default/files/57.4%20%E2%80%9CLittle%20Children%20are%20Sacred%E2%80%9D%20report.pdf

Castan Centre for Human Rights Law (2020). What is the Northern Territory Intervention? The Northern Territory Intervention: An Evaluation, pp. 7-9. https://www.monash.edu/law/research/centres/castancentre/our-areas-of-work/indigenous/the-northern-territory-intervention/the-northern-territory-intervention-an-evaluation/what-is-the-northern-territory-intervention

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 5 Begin Date: 08 Aug 2022

Module/Topic

The Stolen Generations

Chapter

Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Commission (1997). Chapter 2: National Overview. Bringing Them Home: Report of the National Inquiry into the Separation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children from Their Families. https://humanrights.gov.au/our-work/bringing-them-home-chapter-2

Nogrady, B. (2019, June 25). Trauma of Australia’s Indigenous ‘Stolen Generations’ is still affecting children today. Nature. http://dx.doi.org.ezproxy.cqu.edu.au/10.1038/d41586-019-01948-3

Events and Submissions/Topic

Workbook #2 due Monday 8/8 5:00pm AEST

Quiz #1 opens Friday 12/8 9:00am AEST

Vacation Week Begin Date: 15 Aug 2022

Module/Topic

Chapter

Events and Submissions/Topic

Quiz #1 closes Friday 19/8 9:00am AEST

Week 6 Begin Date: 22 Aug 2022

Module/Topic

Aboriginal Deaths in Custody

Chapter

Royal Commission into Aboriginal Deaths in Custody (1991). Chapter 1: Overview. http://www.austlii.edu.au/au/other/IndigLRes/rciadic/national/vol1/

Cunneen, C. (2020, September 30). “The Torment of our Powerlessness”: Police Violence Against Aboriginal People in Australia. Harvard International Review. https://hir.harvard.edu/police-violence-australia-aboriginals/

Events and Submissions/Topic

Research Paper: Part 1 Draft due Monday 22/8 5:00pm AEST

Week 7 Begin Date: 29 Aug 2022

Module/Topic

Social Determinants of Crime: Education and Employment

Chapter

Hogg, R. (2001). Penality and Modes of Regulating Indigenous Peoples in Australia. Punishment & Society 3(3), 355-379. https://doi-org.ezproxy.cqu.edu.au/10.1177/1462474501003003002

Bodkin-Andrews, G. & Carlson, B. (2014). The Legacy of Racism and Indigenous Australian Identity within Education. Race, Ethnicity & Education 19(4), 784-807. https://doi-org.ezproxy.cqu.edu.au/10.1080/13613324.2014.969224

Events and Submissions/Topic

Workbook #3 due Monday 29/8 5:00pm AEST

Week 8 Begin Date: 05 Sep 2022

Module/Topic

Aboriginal Youth and the Criminal Justice System

Chapter

Beresford, Q. (2012). Crime, Justice and Aboriginal Youth. In Beresford, Q., Partington, G. & Gower, G. (Eds.) Reform and Resistance in Aboriginal Education: The Australian Experience. UWA Publishing, Perth, pp. 235-260. https://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/cqu/reader.action?docID=1962985&ppg=244

Healey, J. (Ed.) (2019). Chapter 3: Indigenous Youth Detention. In Healey, J. Indigenous People and Criminal Justice. Issues in Society Vol. 445, Spinney Press, pp. 38-52. https://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/cqu/reader.action?docID=5846447&ppg=43

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 9 Begin Date: 12 Sep 2022

Module/Topic

Indigenous Criminology and Justice Reinvestment

Chapter

Hage, T. & Fellows, J. (2018). Combatting Over-representation of Indigenous Youth in the Queensland Criminal Justice System through 'Justice Reinvestment’. James Cook University Law Review 24, 147-168. https://heinonline-org.ezproxy.cqu.edu.au/HOL/Page?lname=&public=false&collection=journals&handle=hein.journals/jamcook24&men_hide=false&men_tab=toc&kind=&page=147

Schwartz, M., Brown, D. & Cunneen, C. (2017). Justice Reinvestment. Indigenous Justice Clearinghouse Research Briefs. https://www.indigenousjustice.gov.au/wp-content/uploads/mp/files/publications/files/rb21-justice-reinvestment-schwartz-et-al-2017-ijc-webv2.pdf

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 10 Begin Date: 19 Sep 2022

Module/Topic

Indigenous Women as Offenders and Victims

Chapter

Chen, D. (2021). Domestic Violence Responses for Incarcerated Indigenous Women in Australia and New Zealand. Indigenous Justice Clearinghouse Research Briefs. https://www.indigenousjustice.gov.au/wp-content/uploads/mp/files/publications/files/dv-responses-for-incarcerated-indigenous-women-final.pdf

Blagg, H. & Anthony, T. (2019). Carceral Feminism: Saving Indigenous Women from Indigenous Men. In Decolonising Criminology: Imagining Justice in a Postcolonial World. Palgrave Macmillan, pp. 203-234. https://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/cqu/reader.action?docID=5983950&ppg=218

Events and Submissions/Topic

Workbook #4 due Monday 19/9 5:00pm AEST

Week 11 Begin Date: 26 Sep 2022

Module/Topic

Health and Criminal Justice

Chapter

Grace, J., Krom, I., Maling, C., Butler, T. & Midford, R. (2011). Review of Indigenous Offender Health. Australian Indigenous Health Bulletin 11(2). https://healthbulletin.org.au/wp-content/uploads/2011/05/offender_health_review_2011.pdf

Williams, M. (2021, May 20). Comprehensive Indigenous Healthcare in Prisons Requires Federal Funding of Community-Controlled Services. The Conversation. https://theconversation.com/comprehensive-indigenous-health-care-in-prisons-requires-federal-funding-of-community-controlled-services-158131

Events and Submissions/Topic

Research Paper: Part 2 Draft due Monday 26/9 5:00pm AEST

Quiz #2 opens Friday 30/10 9:00am AEST

Week 12 Begin Date: 03 Oct 2022

Module/Topic

Black Lives Matter

Chapter

Mason, B. (2020). Reporting Black Lives Matters: Deaths in Custody Journalism in Australia. Pacific Journalism Review 26(2), 202-220. https://link.gale.com/apps/doc/A646861071/AONE?u=cqu&sid=bookmark-AONE&xid=68c314d2

Events and Submissions/Topic

Quiz #2 closes Friday 7/10 9:00am AEST


Online Quizzes Due: Week 12 Monday (3 Oct 2022) 9:00 am AEST
Review/Exam Week Begin Date: 10 Oct 2022

Module/Topic

Chapter

Events and Submissions/Topic

Workbook #5 + Workbook Reflection due Monday 10/10 5:00pm AEST


Workbooks Due: Review/Exam Week Monday (10 Oct 2022) 5:00 pm AEST
Exam Week Begin Date: 17 Oct 2022

Module/Topic

Chapter

Events and Submissions/Topic

Research Paper due 17/10 5:00pm AEST


Research Paper Due: Exam Week Monday (17 Oct 2022) 5:00 pm AEST
Assessment Tasks

1 Learning logs / diaries / Journal / log books

Assessment Title
Workbooks

Task Description

Throughout this unit, you will be asked to complete various activities outlined in the weekly Learning Modules. These might involve you discussing and reflecting on a topic, participating in a group activity or challenge, researching something, or finding and sharing relevant resources with your classmates in Discussion threads. Each week there will be a challenge or a task that you will be expected to complete and share in the workshop.

FIVE of these activities will be nominated as requirements for your workbook. These are must do tasks. Which activities are workbook tasks and what you are required to do will be outlined in weekly Modules. You will also submit a short reflection on what you have learned in the unit along with your final workbook submission. The main purpose of the workbook tasks is to facilitate your engagement in weekly activities, but they will also test your academic skills like writing, researching and referencing. This means they are not simply box-ticking exercises – you can fail these exercises if they are not sufficiently academic or do not meet requirements.

You will be required to submit:

  • 5 workbook exercises of 250-300 words each in weeks 3, 5, 7, 10 and 13 (5% each)
  • One 250-300 word reflection on what you have learned in the unit along with your workbook submission in week 13 (5%)

Each workbook task must include one properly referenced academic source (APA 7 style).

If you are unable to attend any workshops, these tasks may be completed in a study group that you organise with peers at your own convenience.


Assessment Due Date

Review/Exam Week Monday (10 Oct 2022) 5:00 pm AEST


Return Date to Students

Weighting
30%

Assessment Criteria

  • Creative problem solving in response to challenges
  • Reporting succinctly on challenge task activities and what you learned from them
  • Reflecting on your learning process and identifying knowledge gaps for future study
  • Applying key concepts and ideas from the course material to practical situations
  • Participating in group activities and actively supporting peers’ learning.


Referencing Style

Submission
Online

Submission Instructions
Further instructions for each task will be given in Learning Modules.

Learning Outcomes Assessed
  • Critically reflect on current strategies that aim to improve relations between Indigenous Australians and criminal justice agencies
  • Discuss the impact of historical and contemporary approaches to criminal justice on Indigenous Australians
  • Discuss theories of colonialism and post-colonialism as they pertain to contemporary Australian justice issues
  • Communicate using fundamental Indigenous Australian cultural competency.


Graduate Attributes
  • Communication
  • Problem Solving
  • Critical Thinking
  • Cross Cultural Competence

2 Online Quiz(zes)

Assessment Title
Online Quizzes

Task Description

Two online quizzes will take place on weeks 5-6 and 11-12. The first quiz will open after our week 5 class and assess content from weeks 1-5, and the second will open after week 11 and assess weeks 6-11. Each quiz will consist of 10 multiple choice questions drawn randomly from a larger pool. Questions will each be worth 1% (total of 10% per quiz/20% overall).

Quizzes are designed to gauge your comprehension of course content. Only content from Set Readings and Modules will be included in the quiz optional/additional readings and videos will not be assessed (although they might be interesting and/or helpful for other assessments!)

Each quiz will open on Friday morning and stay open for one week. Once you start the quiz, you will have 24 hours to complete it.


Number of Quizzes

2


Frequency of Quizzes

Other


Assessment Due Date

Week 12 Monday (3 Oct 2022) 9:00 am AEST


Return Date to Students

Weighting
20%

Assessment Criteria

  • Comprehension of set reading materials
  • Application of concepts from the readings to topics in this unit
  • Ability to critically evaluate propositions.


Referencing Style

Submission
Online

Learning Outcomes Assessed
  • Critique the connections between the criminal justice system, health, mental health and poverty, particularly for Indigenous Australian youth
  • Communicate using fundamental Indigenous Australian cultural competency.


Graduate Attributes
  • Communication
  • Problem Solving
  • Critical Thinking
  • Cross Cultural Competence

3 Written Assessment

Assessment Title
Research Paper

Task Description

For this assessment, you will choose one of the following four issues to examine:

  1. Black Lives Matter: Aboriginal deaths in custody in a global context
  2. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women in the criminal justice system
  3. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander youths in the criminal justice system
  4. Self-determination and innovative solutions to the over-representation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People in the criminal justice system.

Focusing on one of these topics, you will conduct your own research and identify relevant academic sources (e.g. peer-reviewed journal articles, books, and appropriate 'grey literature'). You will utilise these sources to explain how historical and contemporary colonial practices and experiences of colonialism continue to affect Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in their interactions with the criminal justice system. You should also be able to employ key concepts, ideas and theoretical terms from the course content in your analysis of your chosen issue.


This assessment has three parts:

PART 1: 400 words

Find two peer-reviewed journal articles. Both articles need to be relevant to your chosen topic, and at least one of them must be authored/co-authored by an Australian First Nations person. Correctly reference each article in APA 7 style. Under each one, note what the key points are for each article and what it contributes for your chosen topic. You need to show that you understand the key points of the article, and that you can use it to add to your own discussion.

PART 2: 600 words

Put together a brief background to your chosen topic, addressing how historical and/or current practices of colonialism impact your chosen issue. You should use as references your two journal articles from Part 1, as well as one grey literature report and at least one other appropriate source.

PART 3: 600 words

For Part 3, you'll look at possible solutions and efforts to address your chosen issue. Outline some interesting initiatives in this space and/or some Aboriginal-controlled organisations working on this problem. What do they do? What programs or services do they work on, and what strategy or approach do they take? Are they culturally appropriate? Do they respect self-determination? What do they do well, and what still needs more work?


Submission:

You will submit drafts of Part 1 & Part 2 throughout the term in weeks 6 and 11 respectively. Draft submissions will not be graded, but they are hurdle requirements, meaning that you must submit something in order to pass the assessment (but you can edit/change things later). This is so that you have the opportunity to discuss your ideas and receive input and feedback as you go along. You will be graded on all 3 parts together when you submit your completed paper at the end of the term.

  • Part 1 draft due Monday 22/8 5:00pm AEST
  • Part 2 draft due Monday 26/9 5:00pm AEST
  • Final submission Parts 1, 2 & 3 due Monday 17/10 5:00pm AEST.


Assessment Due Date

Exam Week Monday (17 Oct 2022) 5:00 pm AEST


Return Date to Students

Weighting
50%

Assessment Criteria

  • Comprehension of coloniality/postcolonial theory and application of key ideas to chosen issue
  • Critically evaluating the impact of colonialism on the experiences of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples within the criminal justice system
  • Use of appropriate academic research and statistics to support an argument
  • Understanding and explaining culturally sensitive approaches to justice
  • Referencing according to APA 7 style guide.


Referencing Style

Submission
Online

Learning Outcomes Assessed
  • Critique the connections between the criminal justice system, health, mental health and poverty, particularly for Indigenous Australian youth
  • Discuss the impact of historical and contemporary approaches to criminal justice on Indigenous Australians
  • Discuss theories of colonialism and post-colonialism as they pertain to contemporary Australian justice issues


Graduate Attributes
  • Communication
  • Problem Solving
  • Critical Thinking
  • Cross Cultural Competence

Academic Integrity Statement

As a CQUniversity student you are expected to act honestly in all aspects of your academic work.

Any assessable work undertaken or submitted for review or assessment must be your own work. Assessable work is any type of work you do to meet the assessment requirements in the unit, including draft work submitted for review and feedback and final work to be assessed.

When you use the ideas, words or data of others in your assessment, you must thoroughly and clearly acknowledge the source of this information by using the correct referencing style for your unit. Using others’ work without proper acknowledgement may be considered a form of intellectual dishonesty.

Participating honestly, respectfully, responsibly, and fairly in your university study ensures the CQUniversity qualification you earn will be valued as a true indication of your individual academic achievement and will continue to receive the respect and recognition it deserves.

As a student, you are responsible for reading and following CQUniversity’s policies, including the Student Academic Integrity Policy and Procedure. This policy sets out CQUniversity’s expectations of you to act with integrity, examples of academic integrity breaches to avoid, the processes used to address alleged breaches of academic integrity, and potential penalties.

What is a breach of academic integrity?

A breach of academic integrity includes but is not limited to plagiarism, self-plagiarism, collusion, cheating, contract cheating, and academic misconduct. The Student Academic Integrity Policy and Procedure defines what these terms mean and gives examples.

Why is academic integrity important?

A breach of academic integrity may result in one or more penalties, including suspension or even expulsion from the University. It can also have negative implications for student visas and future enrolment at CQUniversity or elsewhere. Students who engage in contract cheating also risk being blackmailed by contract cheating services.

Where can I get assistance?

For academic advice and guidance, the Academic Learning Centre (ALC) can support you in becoming confident in completing assessments with integrity and of high standard.

What can you do to act with integrity?