CQUniversity Unit Profile
DFVP20005 Men's Behaviour Change Interventions and Practice
Men's Behaviour Change Interventions and Practice
All details in this unit profile for DFVP20005 have been officially approved by CQUniversity and represent a learning partnership between the University and you (our student).
The information will not be changed unless absolutely necessary and any change will be clearly indicated by an approved correction included in the profile.
General Information

Overview

This unit will provide you with opportunities to develop specialist knowledge of men’s behaviour change interventions and practice with a specific focus on working with voluntary and involuntary clients in domestic and family violence work. Critical use is made of evidence-based research, and practice and policy documents addressing issues related to working with users of violence. Research and writing on a selection of group work modalities and applied group work skills will be taught in this unit. You will explore legal and safety considerations that arise from working with this client group and consider ethical, professional and self-management implications for practice. You will learn more about domestic and family violence perpetration as it affects people from vulnerable populations, such as Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CALD) and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

Details

Career Level: Postgraduate
Unit Level: Level 8
Credit Points: 6
Student Contribution Band: 10
Fraction of Full-Time Student Load: 0.125

Pre-requisites or Co-requisites

There are no requisites for this unit.

Important note: Students enrolled in a subsequent unit who failed their pre-requisite unit, should drop the subsequent unit before the census date or within 10 working days of Fail grade notification. Students who do not drop the unit in this timeframe cannot later drop the unit without academic and financial liability. See details in the Assessment Policy and Procedure (Higher Education Coursework).

Offerings For Term 1 - 2021

Online

Attendance Requirements

All on-campus students are expected to attend scheduled classes – in some units, these classes are identified as a mandatory (pass/fail) component and attendance is compulsory. International students, on a student visa, must maintain a full time study load and meet both attendance and academic progress requirements in each study period (satisfactory attendance for International students is defined as maintaining at least an 80% attendance record).

Class and Assessment Overview

Recommended Student Time Commitment

Each 6-credit Postgraduate unit at CQUniversity requires an overall time commitment of an average of 12.5 hours of study per week, making a total of 150 hours for the unit.

Class Timetable

Bundaberg, Cairns, Emerald, Gladstone, Mackay, Rockhampton, Townsville
Adelaide, Brisbane, Melbourne, Perth, Sydney

Assessment Overview

1. Written Assessment
Weighting: 40%
2. Portfolio
Weighting: 30%
3. Portfolio
Weighting: 30%

Assessment Grading

This is a graded unit: your overall grade will be calculated from the marks or grades for each assessment task, based on the relative weightings shown in the table above. You must obtain an overall mark for the unit of at least 50%, or an overall grade of ‘pass’ in order to pass the unit. If any ‘pass/fail’ tasks are shown in the table above they must also be completed successfully (‘pass’ grade). You must also meet any minimum mark requirements specified for a particular assessment task, as detailed in the ‘assessment task’ section (note that in some instances, the minimum mark for a task may be greater than 50%). Consult the University’s Grades and Results Policy for more details of interim results and final grades.

Previous Student Feedback

Feedback, Recommendations and Responses

Every unit is reviewed for enhancement each year. At the most recent review, the following staff and student feedback items were identified and recommendations were made.

Feedback from Student evaluation

Feedback

Ensure feedback on assignments is returned to students within the 2 weeks after submission.

Recommendation

Unit coordinator to ensure marking and return of assignments is done within 10 working days as a priority.

Feedback from Student feedback

Feedback

Increase flexibility for students in accessing zoom sessions

Recommendation

Record and download mini-lectures more frequently as students requested flexibility in accessing the zoom recordings rather than live sessions.

Unit Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this unit, you will be able to:
  1. Examine the complexities of working with voluntary and involuntary clients who use violence in relation to the influence of gender, ethnicity and culture
  2. Identify defusion strategies for users of violence and reflect on the applicability of these approaches across a range of contexts
  3. Formulate strategies to address the safety issues for the family members of users of violence
  4. Analyse critically prevailing evaluation research on individual and group work modalities for working with users of violence
  5. Demonstrate the ability to apply, and reflect upon, legal, safety and ethical principles in working with users of violence.
Alignment of Learning Outcomes, Assessment and Graduate Attributes
N/A Level
Introductory Level
Intermediate Level
Graduate Level
Professional Level
Advanced Level

Alignment of Assessment Tasks to Learning Outcomes

Assessment Tasks Learning Outcomes
1 2 3 4 5
1 - Written Assessment - 40%
2 - Portfolio - 30%
3 - Portfolio - 30%

Alignment of Graduate Attributes to Learning Outcomes

Graduate Attributes Learning Outcomes
1 2 3 4 5
1 - Knowledge
2 - Communication
3 - Cognitive, technical and creative skills
4 - Research
5 - Self-management
6 - Ethical and Professional Responsibility
7 - Leadership

Alignment of Assessment Tasks to Graduate Attributes

Assessment Tasks Graduate Attributes
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
1 - Written Assessment - 40%
2 - Portfolio - 30%
3 - Portfolio - 30%
Textbooks and Resources

Textbooks

There are no required textbooks.

IT Resources

You will need access to the following IT resources:
  • CQUniversity Student Email
  • Internet
  • Unit Website (Moodle)
Referencing Style

All submissions for this unit must use the referencing style: American Psychological Association 7th Edition (APA 7th edition)

For further information, see the Assessment Tasks.

Teaching Contacts
Brian Sullivan Unit Coordinator
b.sullivan@cqu.edu.au
Schedule
Week 1 - What is reality of DFV in Australia? Begin Date: 08 Mar 2021

Module/Topic

What is the DFV state of the nation? What does the data tell us?

Chapter

World Health Organization:

https://www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/violence-against-women

ANROWS: Violence Against Women; Accurate use of key statistics

https://www.anrows.org.au/publication/violence-against-women-accurate-use-of-key-statistics

Fact check Q&A: Are Indigenous women 34-80 times more likely than average to experience violence?

https://theconversation.com/factcheck-qanda-are-indigenous-women-34-80-times-more-likely-than-average-to-experience-violence-61809

Creative Spirits - Domestic and Family Violence:

https://www.creativespirits.info/aboriginalculture/people/domestic-and-family-violence 

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 2 - Why the focus on men changing behaviour? Is that even fair? Begin Date: 15 Mar 2021

Module/Topic

Aren't women violent too? What are the statistics?

Chapter

Pence, E. and Dasgupta, S. D. (2006). Re-examining 'battering': Are all acts of violence against intimate partners the same? Praxis International - praxisinternational.org 

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 3 - Who are these guys really? Begin Date: 22 Mar 2021

Module/Topic

Characteristics and profiles of men who are identified as DFV offenders.

Chapter

Stark, E. (2006). Commentary on Johnson's "Conflict and control: Gender symmetry and asymmetry in domestic violence." Violence Against Women, 12(11), 1019-1025

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 4 - Is change even possible? Begin Date: 29 Mar 2021

Module/Topic

How do men change from abusive to respectful?

Chapter

Buchbinder, E. L. and Ming, W. (2018). Metaphors of transformation: Change in male batterers. Psychology of Men and Masculinity, 19(3), 352-361

Vlais, R. (2014). Domestic violence perpetrator programs: Education, therapy, support, accountability 'or' struggle? Melbourne, VIC: No To Violence. Male Family Violence Prevention Association. Retrieved from http://www.ntv.org.au/wp-content/uploads/2016/12/Elements-of-DV-perpetrator-program-work.pdf

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 5 - What is the history and evolution of men's DFV intervention programs? Begin Date: 05 Apr 2021

Module/Topic

The history and evolution of men's DFV intervention programs.

Chapter

Barney, J.R. and Carney, M.M. (2011). Interventions for intimate partner violence: A historical review. Journal of Family Violence, 26(3), 235-244.

Brown, J. and James, K. (2014). Therapeutic Responses to Domestic Violence in Australia: A History of Controversies. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Family Therapy 2014, 35, 169–184

Events and Submissions/Topic

Assessment 1: Report due Monday 5.00pm 05/04/21


Essay (2000 words) Due: Week 5 Monday (5 Apr 2021) 5:00 pm AEST
Vacation Week - no lectures this week Begin Date: 12 Apr 2021

Module/Topic

VACATION WEEK

Chapter

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 6 - What are the different approaches and models of men's DFV intervention programs? Begin Date: 19 Apr 2021

Module/Topic

Different models and approaches to men's behaviour change.

Chapter

ANROWS (2015). Perpetrator interventions in Australia: Key findings and future directions. Compass research to policy and practice (issue PP01). Retrieved from https://anrows.org.au/publications/compass-0/perpetrator-interventions-in-australia-key-findings-and-future-directions

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 7 - Do these programs really work? Begin Date: 26 Apr 2021

Module/Topic

What does the research tell us about the effectiveness of these programs?

Chapter

Gondolf, E. (2012). The debate about program effectiveness,  pp 46-81. In The Future of Batterer Programs. Northeastern University Press.

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 8 - What should these program do? Begin Date: 03 May 2021

Module/Topic

Program content and curriculum.

Chapter

Henning, K and Holdford, R. (2006). Minimization, denial and victim-blaming by batterers: How much does the truth matter? Criminal Justice and Behavior, (33)1, 110-130

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 9 - In what context should men's DFV Intervention programs be embedded? Begin Date: 10 May 2021

Module/Topic

Coordinated community responses with a focus on safety and accountability.

Chapter

Clarke, M. Martinez Lotz, L. and Alzuru, C. (2014). Enhancing Local Collaboration in the Criminal Justice Response to Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault: A CCR/SART Development Toolkit

https://nccadv.org/images/pdfs/2020/CCR-SART_Toolkit.pdf

Events and Submissions/Topic

Assessment 2: Portfolio Activity 1 due Monday 5.00pm 10/05/21


REPORT (1500 words - 30%) Due: Week 9 Monday (10 May 2021) 5:00 pm AEST
Week 10 - What policies, procedures, and practices are critical for men's DFV groups? Begin Date: 17 May 2021

Module/Topic

What are the critical elements for safe program?

Chapter

Babcock, J., et al. (2016). Domestic violence perpetrator programs: A proposal for evidence-based standards in the United States. Partner Abuse, (7)4, 355-468.

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 11 - The importance of State standards, guidelines and principles. Begin Date: 24 May 2021

Module/Topic

Striving for safety and accountability in all programs.

Chapter

Centre for Innovative Justice RMIT University (2016). Pathways towards accountability: mapping the journey of perpetrators of family violence– Phase 1. Report to Department of Premier and Cabinet Centre for Innovative Justice. https://ntv.org.au/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Pathways-towards-accountability_CIJ.pdf 

Find your state's DFV Practice Standards

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 12 - Who are the facilitators? Begin Date: 31 May 2021

Module/Topic

What you need to do this work?

Chapter

Stover, C. S., & Lent, K. (2014). Training and certification for domestic violence service providers: The need for a national standard curriculum and training approach. Psychology of Violence, 4(2), 117–127


Events and Submissions/Topic

Assessment 3: Portfolio Activity 2 due Monday 5.00pm 31/05/21


Critical Reflective Journal - (8 entries x 200 words per entry = 1600 words) Due: Week 12 Monday (31 May 2021) 5:00 pm AEST
Review/Exam Week Begin Date: 07 Jun 2021

Module/Topic

Chapter

Events and Submissions/Topic

Exam Week Begin Date: 14 Jun 2021

Module/Topic

Chapter

Events and Submissions/Topic

Assessment Tasks

1 Written Assessment

Assessment Title
Essay (2000 words)

Task Description

UNIT CODE - DFVP20005

UNIT TITLE – Men’s Behaviour Change: Interventions and Practice

Assessment 1 – Why the focus on men?

Type: Written assessment

Due date: 5.00pm (AEST) Monday 05/04/2021(Week 5) Weighting: 40%

Length: 2000 words

Unit Coordinator: Dr. Brian Sullivan

Learning Outcomes Assessed

· 4. Analyse critically prevailing evaluation research on individual and group work modalities for working with users of violence.

· 5. Demonstrate the ability to apply, and reflect upon, legal, safety and ethical principles in working with users of violence.

Aim

The aim of this assessment is to have you prepared to manage misunderstandings, misconceptions, and mistaken beliefs around the topic of men’s use of violence against intimate partners and in their families. This assessment will have you read, critique, and weigh research evidence and respond in a balanced and reflective way.

Instructions

You are writing an analytic response to the charge that domestic and family violence is not a gendered issue, that men and women are equally as violent as each other.

Please follow the steps below to complete your assessment task:

1. Read and critique the literature about men’s and women’s use of domestic and family violence.

2. Identify the opposing sides of the argument and what their cases are.

3. Weigh the evidence for whether this is a gendered issue or not.

4. Outline the major points for whether DFV is a gendered issue or not.

5. Summarise your argument in your conclusion.

Literature and references

In this assessment use at least 10 contemporary references (<10 years) to support your discussion. You may also use seminal scholarly literature where

relevant. Suitable references include peer-reviewed journal articles as well as textbooks and credible websites. When sourcing information, consider

the 5 elements of a quality reference: currency, authority, relevance, objectivity, and coverage. Grey literature sourced from the internet must be from reputable websites

such as from government, university, or peak national bodies: for example, ANROWS, NTV, .

Requirements

· Use a conventional and legible size 12 font, such as Times New Roman or Arial, with 1.5 line spacing and 2.54cm page margins (standard pre-set margin in Microsoft Word).

· Include page numbers on each page in a header.

· Write in the third-person perspective.

· Use formal academic language.

· Use the seventh edition American Psychological Association (APA) referencing style. The CQUniversity Academic Learning Centre has an online APA Referencing Style Guide.

· The word count is considered from the first word of the introduction to the last word of the conclusion. The word count excludes the reference list but includes in-text references and direct quotations.

Resources

· You can use unit provided materials and other credible sources

(e.g. journal articles, books, grey literature ) to reference your argument. The quality and credibility of your sources are important.

· We recommend you use EndNote to manage your citations and reference list. More information on how to use EndNote is available at the CQUniversity Library website.

· For information on academic communication please go to

the Academic Learning Centre Moodle site. The Academic Communication section has many helpful resources including information for students with English as a second language.

· Submit a draft before the due date to review your Turnitin Similarity Score before making a final submission. Instructions are available here.

Submission

Submit your assessment via the unit Moodle site in Microsoft Word format only.

Marking Criteria

Refer to the marking rubric on the Moodle site for more detail on how marks will be allocated.

Some suggested references (this is only a start - please undertake your own search)

Dobash, R.P. and Dobash, R.E. (2004) ‘Women’s violence to men in intimate relationships. Working on a Puzzle’, British Journal of Criminology, 44(3), pp. 324–349

Hester, M. (2013) ‘Who Does What to Whom? Gender and Domestic Violence Perpetrators in English Police Records’, European Journal of Criminology, 10: 623- 637

Myhill, A. (2015) ‘Measuring coercive control: what can we learn from national population surveys?’ Violence Against Women. 21(3), pp. 355-375

Myhill, A. (2017) ‘Measuring domestic violence: context is everything.’ Journal of Gender-Based Violence, vol 1, no 1, 33–44

Walby, S. and Allen, J. (2004) Domestic Violence, Sexual Assault and Stalking: Findings from the British Crime Survey. Home Office Research Study 276. London: Home Office

Walby, S. and Towers, J. (May 2017) ‘Measuring violence to end violence: mainstreaming gender’, Journal of Gender-Based Violence, vol. 1, no.

Walby, S. and Towers, J. (2018) ‘Untangling the concept of coercive control: Theorizing domestic violent crime’, Criminology & Criminal Justice, Vol 18, Issue 1, pp 7-28


Assessment Due Date

Week 5 Monday (5 Apr 2021) 5:00 pm AEST


Return Date to Students

Assessment will be returned 10 working days after submission.


Weighting
40%

Assessment Criteria

UNIT CODE - DFVP20005

UNIT TITLE - Men’s Behaviour Change: Intervention and Practice

ASSESSMENT 1: Essay – Why Focus on the Men? – 2000 words - 40% of Final Grade

Key Criteria High Distinction 84.5 – 100% Distinction 74.50 – 84.49% Credit 64.50 – 74.49% Pass 49.50 – 64.49% Fail <49.5% Fail (content absent) 0%
Completion of required task, appropriately structured. (10%) Exemplary effort and structure in your work. Professional approach with no or very minor gaps. Attention to detail is without fault and all requirements of task have been met. (8.45-10) Excellent effort attending to requirements of the tasks. All items demonstrate due attention to detail with some minor gaps. (7.45-8.44) Good effort attending to requirements of the task. All items demonstrate due attention to detail with some gaps that impact on presentation and understanding by the reader and/or audience. (6.45-7.44) Satisfactory effort attending to requirements of the task. Most items demonstrate due attention to detail with some gaps that impact on presentation and understanding by the reader and/or audience. (4.95-6.44) Submission is missing aspects of task or task requirements have been misunderstood, or structure is not evident. (<4.95) Submission is missing most aspects of task. Little evidence of task requirements. (0)
Coverage and critique of the literature, identifying the various sides to argument. (40%) Comprehensive coverage of the literature, with astute critique, show very clearly the opposing points of view. (33.80-40) Strong coverage of the literature, with strong critique, showing clearly the opposing points of view (29.8-33.7) Good coverage of the literature, with good critique, showing quite well the opposing points of view. (25.8-29.7) Adequate coverage of the literature, with sufficient critique, showing the basic opposing points of view (19.8-25.7) Inadequate coverage of the literature, with insufficient critique, and not understanding the opposing points of view (<19.8) No coverage or critique of the literature, and no identification of the opposing points of view. (0)
Outlining major points of arguments, weighing the evidence, and making your case for whether DFV is a gendered issue or not, with a strong summary. (40%) The evidence for whether DFV is a gendered issue has been anaylsed comprehensively and summarised articulately. (33.8-40) The evidence for whether DFV is a gendered issue has been analysed strongly and summarised clearly, with only minor missing information. (29.8-33.7) The evidence for whether DFV is a gendered issue has been analysed well and summarised quite clearly, with some missing information. (25.8-29.7) The evidence for whether DFV is a gendered issue has been analysed sufficiently and summarised adequately, although with missing information. (19.8-25.7) The evidence for whether DFV is a gendered issue has been analysed insufficiently and summarised inadequately. Important information is missing. (<19.8) There is no evidence for whether DFV is a gendered issue. There is no analysis or summary of the available information. (0)
Ability to write, reference, and present effectively, using APA 7 Style. (10%) Exemplary writing standard. Correct grammar, spelling and punctuation. Uses appropriate writing and referencing styles. No or very minor mistakes evident. (8.45-10) Quality of writing is of a high standard with only minor grammar, spelling, punctuation and referencing mistakes evident. (7.45-8.44) Quality of writing is of a good standard with a few grammar, spelling punctuation and referencing mistakes evident. (6.45-7.44) Quality of writing and presentation is of a satisfactory standard with quite a few grammar, punctuation, spelling and referencing mistakes evident. (4.95-6.44) Quality of writing and presentation is at a poor standard with many mistakes and lack of clarity evident. (<4.95) Little to no meaningful writing. (0)


Referencing Style

Submission
Online

Submission Instructions
Submission through Moodle.

Learning Outcomes Assessed
  • Examine the complexities of working with voluntary and involuntary clients who use violence in relation to the influence of gender, ethnicity and culture
  • Identify defusion strategies for users of violence and reflect on the applicability of these approaches across a range of contexts
  • Demonstrate the ability to apply, and reflect upon, legal, safety and ethical principles in working with users of violence.


Graduate Attributes
  • Knowledge
  • Communication
  • Cognitive, technical and creative skills
  • Research
  • Self-management
  • Ethical and Professional Responsibility
  • Leadership

2 Portfolio

Assessment Title
REPORT (1500 words - 30%)

Task Description

UNIT CODE - DFVP20005

UNIT TITLE – Men’s Behaviour Change: Interventions and Practice

Assessment 2 – Group work with male DFV offenders.

Type: Report

Due date: 5.00pm Monday (AEST) 10/05/21 (Week 9).

Weighting: 30%

Length: 1500 words

Unit Coordinator: Dr. Brian Sullivan

Learning Outcomes Assessed

· 1. Examine the complexities of working with voluntary and involuntary clients who use violence in relation to the influence of gender, ethnicity and culture.

· 2. Identify defusing strategies for users of violence and reflect on the applicability of these approaches across a range of contexts.

Aim

The aim of this assessment is to report on the evidence-based research for men’s domestic violence behaviour change programs so as to advise your organisation of the likelihood of implementing program in your community.

Instructions

You have been asked by your organisation to write a report on the effectiveness of men’s domestic and family violence behaviour change programs.

Please follow the steps below to complete your assessment task:

1. Search for a literature base that assesses the complexities of determining the effectiveness of men’s programs and read it critically.

2. Identify the various sides of the argument and explain what their cases are.

3. List the benefits and the potential problems of men’s programs.

4. Argue the case ‘for’, based on the research, while showing an awareness of the challenges of these programs.

Literature and references

In this assessment use at least 10 contemporary references (<10 years) to support your discussion. You may also use seminal scholarly literature where relevant. Suitable references include peer-reviewed journal articles as well as textbooks and credible websites. When sourcing information, consider the 5 elements of a quality reference: currency, authority, relevance, objectivity, and coverage. Grey literature sourced from the internet must be from reputable websites such as from government, university, or peak national bodies: for example, ANROWS, NTV, and other valid organisations.

Requirements

· Use a conventional and legible size 12 font, such as Times New Roman or Arial, with 1.5 line spacing and 2.54cm page margins (standard pre-set margin in Microsoft Word).

· Include page numbers on each page in a header.

· Write in the third-person perspective.

· Use formal academic language.

· Use the seventh edition American Psychological Association (APA) referencing style. The CQUniversity Academic Learning Centre has an online APA Referencing Style Guide.

· The word count is considered from the first word of the introduction to the last word of the conclusion. The word count excludes the reference list but includes in-text references and direct quotations.

Resources

· You can use unit provided materials and other credible sources (e.g., journal articles, books, grey literature) to reference your argument. The quality and credibility of your sources are important.

· We recommend you use EndNote to manage your citations and reference list. More information on how to use EndNote is available at the CQUniversity Library website.

· For information on academic communication please go to the Academic Learning Centre Moodle site. The Academic Communication section has many helpful resources including information for students with English as a second language.

· Submit a draft before the due date to review your Turnitin Similarity Score before making a final submission. Instructions are available here.

Submission

Submit your assessment via the unit Moodle site in Microsoft Word format only.

Marking Criteria

Refer to the marking rubric on the Moodle site for more detail on how marks will be allocated.

References (these are a start only – you will need to extend your search for this assignment)

Australia’s National Research Organisation for Women’s Safety. (2019). Men’s behaviour change programs: Measuring outcomes and improving program quality: Key findings and future directions (Research to policy and practice, 01/2019). Sydney, NSW: ANROWS

Day, A., Vlais, R., Chung, D., & Green, D. J. (2019). Evaluation readiness, program quality and outcomes in men’s behaviour change programs (Research report, 01/2019). Sydney, NSW: ANROWS.

Katharine Herman , Robert Rotunda , Gail Williamson & Stephen Vodanovich (2014) Outcomes From a Duluth Model Batterer Intervention Program at Completion and Long Term Follow-Up, Journal of Offender Rehabilitation, 53:1, 1-18

Gondolf, E. (1999). A comparison of four batterer intervention systems: Do court referral, program length, and services matter. Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 14(1), 41-61

Gondolf, E. (1997). Batterer programs: What we know and need to know. Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 12(1), 83-98

Gondolf, E. (2012) The future of batterer intervention systems. Chapter 2 The debate about program effectiveness pp.. 46-83. Northeastern University Press.

O’Connor, A., Morris, H., Panayiotidis, A., Cooke, V., and Skouteris, H. (2020). Rapid review of men’s behaviour change programs. Violence and Abuse, 1-18

Westmarland, N. and Kelly, L. (2013). Why extending measurements of ‘success’ in domestic violence perpetrator programmes matters for social work. The British Journal of Social Work, 43960, 1092-1111


Assessment Due Date

Week 9 Monday (10 May 2021) 5:00 pm AEST


Return Date to Students

Within 10 working days of submission


Weighting
30%

Assessment Criteria

UNIT CODE - DFVP20005 UNIT TITLE - Men’s Behaviour Change: Intervention and Practice ASSESSMENT 2: – Report on Group Work with Male DFV Offenders - 30% of Final Grade – 1500 words
Key Criteria High Distinction 84.5 – 100% Distinction 74.50 – 84.49% Credit 64.50 – 74.49% Pass 49.50 – 64.49% Fail <49.5% Fail (content absent) 0%
Completion of required task, appropriately structured. (10%) Exemplary effort and structure in your work. Professional approach with no or very minor gaps. Attention to detail is without fault and all requirements of task have been met. (8.45-10) Excellent effort attending to requirements of the tasks. All items demonstrate due attention to detail with some minor gaps. (7.45-8.44) Good effort attending to requirements of the task. All items demonstrate due attention to detail with some gaps that impact on presentation and understanding by the reader and/or audience. (6.45-7.44) Satisfactory effort attending to requirements of the task. Most items demonstrate due attention to detail with some gaps that impact on presentation and understanding by the reader and/or audience. (4.95-6.44) Submission is missing aspects of task or task requirements have been misunderstood, or structure is not evident. (<4.95) Submission is missing most aspects of task. Little evidence of task requirements. (0)
Critically review the literature on the effectiveness of men’s domestic violence intervention programs (known as batterer intervention programs in the USA), assessing the complexities of determining effectiveness. (40%) Comprehensive review of the literature with a clear understanding of the effectiveness of men’s programs and the complexities involved in determining effectiveness. (33.8-40) Strong review of the literature with a very good understanding of the effectiveness of men’s programs and the complexities involved in determining effectiveness (29.8-33.7) Solid review of the literature with a good understanding of the effectiveness of men’s programs and the complexities involved in determining effectiveness (25.8-29.7) Adequate review of the literature with a sufficient understanding of the effectiveness of men’s programs and the complexities involved in determining effectiveness (19.8-25.7) Limited review of the literature with an insufficient understanding of the effectiveness of men’s programs and the complexities involved in determining effectiveness (<19.8) No meaningful review of literature and little to no understanding of the effectiveness of men’s programs and the complexities involved in determining effectiveness (0)
Identify the benefits of and concerns about men’s programs and argue the cautious case ‘for’ the implementation of these programs (40%) Comprehensive understanding of both benefits of and concerns about men’s programs, while excellently arguing the case for implementation (33.8-40) Strong understanding of both benefits of and concerns about men’s programs, while arguing strongly for their implementation (29.8-33.7) Solid understanding of both benefits of and concerns about men’s programs, while arguing well for their implementation (25.8-29.7) Adequate understanding of both benefits of and concerns about men’s programs, while arguing sufficiently for their implementation. (19.8-25.7) Little understanding of benefits of and concerns about men’s programs, with a limited argument for their implementation. (<19.8) No understanding of benefits of and concerns about men’s programs, and no argument for their implementation (0)
Ability to write, reference, and present effectively, using APA 7 Style. (10%) Exemplary writing standard. Correct grammar, spelling and punctuation. Uses appropriate writing and referencing styles. No or very minor mistakes evident. (8.45-10) Quality of writing is of a high standard with only minor grammar, spelling, punctuation and referencing mistakes evident. (7.45-8.44) Quality of writing is of a good standard with few grammar, spelling punctuation and referencing mistakes evident. (6.45-7.44) Quality of writing and presentation is of a satisfactory standard with quite a few grammar, punctuation, spelling and referencing mistakes evident. (4.95-6.44) Quality of writing and presentation is at a poor standard with many mistakes and lack of clarity evident. (<4.95) Little to no meaningful writing.


Referencing Style

Submission
Online

Learning Outcomes Assessed
  • Identify defusion strategies for users of violence and reflect on the applicability of these approaches across a range of contexts
  • Formulate strategies to address the safety issues for the family members of users of violence
  • Analyse critically prevailing evaluation research on individual and group work modalities for working with users of violence


Graduate Attributes
  • Knowledge
  • Communication
  • Cognitive, technical and creative skills
  • Research
  • Self-management
  • Ethical and Professional Responsibility
  • Leadership

3 Portfolio

Assessment Title
Critical Reflective Journal - (8 entries x 200 words per entry = 1600 words)

Task Description

UNIT CODE - DFVP20005

UNIT TITLE – Men’s Behaviour Change: Interventions and Practice

Assignment 3 - CRITICAL REFLECTIVE JOURNAL

Due date: 5.00pm Monday (AEST) 31/05/21 (week 12)

Weighting: 30%

Length: 1600 words (+/- 10%).

___________________________________________________________________________

Unit Learning Outcomes

This assessment item relates to unit learning outcomes 1, 3, & 5

· 1. Examine the complexities of working with voluntary and involuntary clients who use violence in relation to the influence of gender, ethnicity, and culture.

· 3. Formulate strategies to address the safety issues for the family members of users of violence.

· 5. Demonstrate the ability to apply, and reflect upon, legal, safety and ethical principles in working with users of violence.

Assessment 3: Portfolio (Critical Reflective Journal)

Aim

The aim of this assessment is for students to critically reflect upon the readings, concepts, and issues that arise in this unit that are relevant for interventions and professional practice with male offenders of domestic and family violence.

Instructions

1. Compile a critical reflective journal of 8 entries (300 words each).

2. In your Introduction, please explain your understanding of critical reflective practice and why it is such a significant skill for domestic violence intervention workers, especially for facilitators of men’s behaviour change groups.

3. Consider and critical reflect on your experience of reading, engaging with, and responding to the literature in this unit from a personal and professional point of view. How has this confirmed and/or challenged your understanding of professional practice. Some of the topics to consider will be:

a. Government legislation, policies, and standards

b. Men’s violence compared to women’s violence.

c. The change processes.

d. Evidence for the effectiveness of group work

e. Facilitators and selfcare.

f. The context of this work.

g. Self-care.

h. Beliefs, assumptions, and behaviour (yours and the men’s).

i. Content and curriculum.

4. Your critical reflection journal may incorporate some of the following ideas, as you reflect on interventions and practice and the place of the men’s behaviour change programs:

· Consider and critically reflect on your experience of or perceptions of how men’s behaviour change programs function, and the evidence for the effectiveness of these programs.

· Consider and critically reflect on your experiences of or perceptions of the principles of safety and accountability for men’s programs.

· Critically reflect on some of the controversies and challenges associated with men’s programs.

· Your critical reflection journal shows evidence of an engagement with peer reviewed and grey literature (no less than 5 peer reviewed articles and 3 entries of grey literature)

5. Reference list (not included in word count)

Please refer to the Introduction to Critical Reflective Practice in the Domestic and Family Violence Practice Program at the beginning of this unit (in Moodle). This assessment requires you to begin your journal entries very early in the term (Week 2 at the latest) and regularly add entries.

Requirements

· Use a conventional and legible size 12 font, such as Times New Roman or Arial, with 1.5 line spacing and 2.54cm page margins (standard pre-set margin in Microsoft Word).

· Include page numbers on each page in a header.

· Write in the first-person perspective.

· Because this is a journal, there is less need to use formal academic language.

· Use the seventh edition American Psychological Association (APA) referencing style. The CQUniversity Academic Learning Centre has an online APA Referencing Style Guide.

· The word count is considered from the first word of the introduction to the last word of the conclusion. The word count excludes the reference list but includes in-text references and direct quotations.

Resources

· You can use unit provided materials and other credible sources (e.g., journal articles, books, grey literature) to reference your argument. The quality and credibility of your sources are important.

· We recommend you use EndNote to manage your citations and reference list. More information on how to use EndNote is available at the CQUniversity Library website.

· For information on academic communication please go to the Academic Learning Centre Moodle site. The Academic Communication section has many helpful resources including information for students with English as a second language.

· Submit a draft before the due date to review your Turnitin Similarity Score before making a final submission. Instructions are available here.

Submission

Submit your assessment via the unit Moodle site in Microsoft Word format only.

Marking Criteria

Refer to the marking rubric on the Moodle site for more detail on how marks will be allocated.


Assessment Due Date

Week 12 Monday (31 May 2021) 5:00 pm AEST


Return Date to Students

Within 10 working days of submission


Weighting
30%

Assessment Criteria

UNIT CODE - DFVP20005

UNIT TITLE - Men’s Behaviour Change: Intervention and Practice

ASSESSMENT 3: – Critical Reflection Journal - 30% of Final Grade – 8 entries of 200 words = 1600 words

Key Criteria High Distinction 84.5 – 100% Distinction 74.50 – 84.49% Credit 64.50 – 74.49% Pass 49.50 – 64.49% Fail <49.5% Fail (content absent) 0%
Completion of required task, appropriately structured. (10%) Exemplary effort and structure in your work. Professional approach with no or very minor gaps. Attention to detail is without fault and all requirements of task have been met. (8.45-10) Excellent effort attending to requirements of the tasks. All items demonstrate due attention to detail with some minor gaps. (7.45-8.44) Good effort attending to requirements of the task. All items demonstrate due attention to detail with some gaps that impact on presentation and understanding by the reader and/or audience. (6.45-7.44) Satisfactory effort attending to requirements of the task. Most items demonstrate due attention to detail with some gaps that impact on presentation and understanding by the reader and/or audience. (4.95-6.44) Submission is missing aspects of task or task requirements have been misunderstood, or structure is not evident. (<4.95) Submission is missing most aspects of task. Little evidence of task requirements. (0)
Relevance and depth of critical reflection and response, focused on the course content and reading material. (40%) Shows comprehensive engagement with course content and reading material, responding with excellent relevance and depth in your critical reflection (33.80-40) Shows excellent engagement with course content and reading material, responding with strong relevance and depth in your critical reflection (29.8-33.7) Shows strong engagement with course content and reading material, responding with appropriate relevance and depth in your critical reflection (25.8-29.7) Shows good engagement with course content and reading material, responding with sufficient relevance and depth in your critical reflection (19.8-25.7) Shows limited engagement with course content and reading material, responding with inadequate relevance and depth in your critical reflection (<19.8) No focus on course content or reading material, with no relevance or depth of critical reflection and response (0)
Understanding one’s assumptions, prejudices, beliefs, practice bases, and areas for growth (40%) Comprehensive evidence of awareness of one’s assumptions, prejudices, beliefs, and practice base, with an excellent understanding of one’s areas of growth (33.8-40) Strong evidence of awareness of one’s assumptions, prejudices, beliefs, and practice base, with a strong understanding of one’s areas of growth (29.8-33.7) Good evidence of awareness of one’s assumptions, prejudices, beliefs, and practice base, with good understanding of one’s areas of growth . (25.8-29.7) Sufficient evidence of awareness of one’s assumptions, prejudices, beliefs, and practice base, with adequate understanding of one areas of growth (19.8-25.7) Little evidence of awareness of one’s assumptions, prejudices, beliefs, and practice base, with little or no understanding on one’s areas of growth. (<19.8) No evidence of awareness of one’s assumptions, prejudices, beliefs, and practice base, with no understanding of one’s areas of growth (0)
Ability to write, reference, and present effectively, using APA 7 Style. (10%) Exemplary writing standard. Correct grammar, spelling and punctuation. Uses appropriate writing and referencing styles. No or very minor mistakes evident. (8.45-10) Quality of writing is of a high standard with only minor grammar, spelling, punctuation and referencing mistakes evident. (7.45-8.44) Quality of writing is of a good standard with few grammar, spelling punctuation and referencing mistakes evident. (6.45-7.44) Quality of writing and presentation is of a satisfactory standard with quite a few grammar, punctuation, spelling and referencing mistakes evident. (4.95-6.44) Quality of writing and presentation is at a poor standard with many mistakes and lack of clarity evident. (<4.95) Little to no meaningful writing. (0)


Referencing Style

Submission
Online

Learning Outcomes Assessed
  • Formulate strategies to address the safety issues for the family members of users of violence
  • Demonstrate the ability to apply, and reflect upon, legal, safety and ethical principles in working with users of violence.


Graduate Attributes
  • Knowledge
  • Communication
  • Cognitive, technical and creative skills
  • Research
  • Self-management
  • Ethical and Professional Responsibility

Academic Integrity Statement

As a CQUniversity student you are expected to act honestly in all aspects of your academic work.

Any assessable work undertaken or submitted for review or assessment must be your own work. Assessable work is any type of work you do to meet the assessment requirements in the unit, including draft work submitted for review and feedback and final work to be assessed.

When you use the ideas, words or data of others in your assessment, you must thoroughly and clearly acknowledge the source of this information by using the correct referencing style for your unit. Using others’ work without proper acknowledgement may be considered a form of intellectual dishonesty.

Participating honestly, respectfully, responsibly, and fairly in your university study ensures the CQUniversity qualification you earn will be valued as a true indication of your individual academic achievement and will continue to receive the respect and recognition it deserves.

As a student, you are responsible for reading and following CQUniversity’s policies, including the Student Academic Integrity Policy and Procedure. This policy sets out CQUniversity’s expectations of you to act with integrity, examples of academic integrity breaches to avoid, the processes used to address alleged breaches of academic integrity, and potential penalties.

What is a breach of academic integrity?

A breach of academic integrity includes but is not limited to plagiarism, self-plagiarism, collusion, cheating, contract cheating, and academic misconduct. The Student Academic Integrity Policy and Procedure defines what these terms mean and gives examples.

Why is academic integrity important?

A breach of academic integrity may result in one or more penalties, including suspension or even expulsion from the University. It can also have negative implications for student visas and future enrolment at CQUniversity or elsewhere. Students who engage in contract cheating also risk being blackmailed by contract cheating services.

Where can I get assistance?

For academic advice and guidance, the Academic Learning Centre (ALC) can support you in becoming confident in completing assessments with integrity and of high standard.

What can you do to act with integrity?