CQUniversity Unit Profile
DFVP20006 Working with Victims/Survivors of Domestic and Family Violence
Working with Victims/Survivors of Domestic and Family Violence
All details in this unit profile for DFVP20006 have been officially approved by CQUniversity and represent a learning partnership between the University and you (our student).
The information will not be changed unless absolutely necessary and any change will be clearly indicated by an approved correction included in the profile.
General Information

Overview

This unit will provide you with opportunities to develop specialist knowledge of safe and respectful approaches to working with victims/survivors of domestic and family violence. It provides a theoretical framework of trauma as it relates to victims/ survivors of this violence and the effect it has on personal development and relationships. Using a gendered approach, critical use is made of evidence-based research, and practice and policy documents addressing issues related to victims/ survivors of violence. You will explore legal and safety considerations that arise from working with this client group and you will consider ethical, professional and self-management implications for practice. Particular consideration will be given to Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CALD) and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities and victims/survivors.

Details

Career Level: Postgraduate
Unit Level: Level 8
Credit Points: 6
Student Contribution Band: 10
Fraction of Full-Time Student Load: 0.125

Pre-requisites or Co-requisites

There are no requisites for this unit.

Important note: Students enrolled in a subsequent unit who failed their pre-requisite unit, should drop the subsequent unit before the census date or within 10 working days of Fail grade notification. Students who do not drop the unit in this timeframe cannot later drop the unit without academic and financial liability. See details in the Assessment Policy and Procedure (Higher Education Coursework).

Offerings For Term 1 - 2020

Online

Attendance Requirements

All on-campus students are expected to attend scheduled classes – in some units, these classes are identified as a mandatory (pass/fail) component and attendance is compulsory. International students, on a student visa, must maintain a full time study load and meet both attendance and academic progress requirements in each study period (satisfactory attendance for International students is defined as maintaining at least an 80% attendance record).

Class and Assessment Overview

Recommended Student Time Commitment

Each 6-credit Postgraduate unit at CQUniversity requires an overall time commitment of an average of 12.5 hours of study per week, making a total of 150 hours for the unit.

Class Timetable

Bundaberg, Cairns, Emerald, Gladstone, Mackay, Rockhampton, Townsville
Adelaide, Brisbane, Melbourne, Perth, Sydney

Assessment Overview

1. Portfolio
Weighting: 30%
2. Portfolio
Weighting: 30%
3. Written Assessment
Weighting: 40%

Assessment Grading

This is a graded unit: your overall grade will be calculated from the marks or grades for each assessment task, based on the relative weightings shown in the table above. You must obtain an overall mark for the unit of at least 50%, or an overall grade of ‘pass’ in order to pass the unit. If any ‘pass/fail’ tasks are shown in the table above they must also be completed successfully (‘pass’ grade). You must also meet any minimum mark requirements specified for a particular assessment task, as detailed in the ‘assessment task’ section (note that in some instances, the minimum mark for a task may be greater than 50%). Consult the University’s Grades and Results Policy for more details of interim results and final grades.

Previous Student Feedback

Feedback, Recommendations and Responses

Every unit is reviewed for enhancement each year. At the most recent review, the following staff and student feedback items were identified and recommendations were made.

Feedback from Student feedback via email and personal phone calls

Feedback

Personalised student experience feedback provided by email and during phone calls. Students indicated that they valued personal emails, phone calls and interactions with personal one-on-one Zoom meetings.

Recommendation

Given that students are very busy, they value personal emails and EASI CONNECT along with phone calls or one-on-one Zoom meetings. Continue frequent regular interaction that helps students be engaged and informed about the unit.

Feedback from Unit coordinator via debriefing with peers

Feedback

Self-evaluation after discussion with colleagues. It was observed that high student interaction and regular engagement occurred. Students valued personal interaction and constructive feedback on assessment items.

Recommendation

The unit ran very successfully with high student interaction and regular engagement. I provided regular announcements, personal emails and phone calls along with Zoom meetings. Constructive feedback was provided to the assessment pieces, which were valued by some students. Continue regular interaction and feedback to assessment pieces as per this term.

Feedback from Unit coordinator via self-reflective practice

Feedback

Self-reflection is a constant reflective practice I engage in. I believe that students appreciate me modeling self-reflective practice, which I emphasise as critical in being a responsible practitioner. Regardless of the official feedback, I have received very positive informal feedback from students during the course of the unit.

Recommendation

Postgraduate students enrolled in the specialised DFVP courses are not only time-poor but work in a highly sensitive and demanding area. This may result in low response rates for the formal evaluation of the unit while consistently indicating their gratitude for the content of the unit and personal engagement with each student. Continue personal and interactive engagement and support of students during the course of the unit.

Unit Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this unit, you will be able to:
  1. Examine safe approaches to working with victims/ survivors of domestic and family violence and ethical and legal implications in practice
  2. Identify issues considered to be precipitants or causal factors in domestic and family violence victimology and how these intersect with gender, culture and ethnicity.
  3. Formulate safety and self-care plans for victim/survivors and those who work with them in domestic and family violence contexts.
  4. Evaluate the diversity of factors that influence program development and policies nationally and internationally in domestic and family violence contexts.
  5. Evaluate specific system and program initiatives related to the provision of social services for victims of domestic and family violence in Queensland and Australia.
Alignment of Learning Outcomes, Assessment and Graduate Attributes
N/A Level
Introductory Level
Intermediate Level
Graduate Level
Professional Level
Advanced Level

Alignment of Assessment Tasks to Learning Outcomes

Assessment Tasks Learning Outcomes
1 2 3 4 5
1 - Portfolio - 30%
2 - Portfolio - 30%
3 - Written Assessment - 40%

Alignment of Graduate Attributes to Learning Outcomes

Graduate Attributes Learning Outcomes
1 2 3 4 5
1 - Knowledge
2 - Communication
3 - Cognitive, technical and creative skills
4 - Research
5 - Self-management
6 - Ethical and Professional Responsibility
7 - Leadership

Alignment of Assessment Tasks to Graduate Attributes

Assessment Tasks Graduate Attributes
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
1 - Portfolio - 30%
2 - Portfolio - 30%
3 - Written Assessment - 40%
Textbooks and Resources

Textbooks

There are no required textbooks.

IT Resources

You will need access to the following IT resources:
  • CQUniversity Student Email
  • Internet
  • Unit Website (Moodle)
Referencing Style

All submissions for this unit must use the referencing style: American Psychological Association 6th Edition (APA 6th edition)

For further information, see the Assessment Tasks.

Teaching Contacts
Marika Guggisberg Unit Coordinator
m.guggisberg@cqu.edu.au
Schedule
Week 1 Begin Date: 09 Mar 2020

Module/Topic

Introduction to working with victim/survivors of domestic and family violence: Legislation and Policy

Chapter

Phillips, R. L., & Guthrie, R. (2019). Rights to protection and the state: The Australian Government's National Plan to reduce violence against women and children and victim's justice. Australian Journal of Political Science, 54, 1 - 17. see eReading List

The National Plan to Reduce Violence Against Women and Their Children 2010 – 2022.

https://www.dss.gov.au/women/programs-services/reducing-violence/the-national-plan-to-reduce-violence-against-women-and-their-children-2010-2022

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 2 Begin Date: 16 Mar 2020

Module/Topic

Introduction to Victimology: Construction the victim of crime

Chapter

Strobl, R. (2004). Constructing the Victim: Theoretical Reflections and Empirical Examples. International Review of Victimology, 11(2–3), 295–311. see eReading List

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 3 Begin Date: 23 Mar 2020

Module/Topic

Professional practice: Ethical considerations, safety implications and self-care

Chapter

O’Brien, C. (2015). Working with domestic violence: A clinician’s guide to ethical and competent practice. InPsych, 37, 1-6. see eReading List

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 4 Begin Date: 30 Mar 2020

Module/Topic

Domestic homicide: Nature, extent and risk indicators

Chapter

Johnson, H., Eriksson, L., Mazerolle, P., & Wortley, R. (2019). Intimate femicide: The role of coercive control. Feminist Criminology, 14, 3 - 23. see eReading List

Sheehan, B. E., Murphy, S. B., Moynihan, M. M., Dudley-Fennessey, E., & Stapleton, J. G. (2017). Intimate partner homicide: New insights for understanding lethality and risks. Violence Against Women, 21, 269-288.


Domestic and Family Violence Death Review and Advisory Board. (2017). Intimate partner homicide of ‘Kelly’: Case Review Report. Brisbane, QLD: Author

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 5 Begin Date: 06 Apr 2020

Module/Topic

Working with victim/survivors: The role and nature of different services

Chapter

Flasch, P., Fall, K., Stice, B.,Easley, R., Murray, C., & Crowe, A. (2019). Messages to new survivors by longer-term survivors of Intimate Partner Violence. Journal of Family Violence, see eReading List


Arroyo, K., Lundahl, B., Butters, R., Vanderloo, M., & Wood, D. S. (2017). Short-term interventions for survivors of Intimate Partner Violence: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Trauma, Violence, & Abuse, 18, 155 – 171. see eReading List

Events and Submissions/Topic

Portfolio Assessment due


Portfolio - Due: Week 5 Monday (6 Apr 2020) 11:45 pm AEST
Vacation Week Begin Date: 13 Apr 2020

Module/Topic

Chapter

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 6 Begin Date: 20 Apr 2020

Module/Topic

Working with victim/survivors: The role and nature of trauma-informed practice

Chapter

Wilson, J. M., Fauci, J. E., & Goodman, L. A. (2015). Bringing trauma-informed practice to domestic violence programs: A qualitative analysis of current approaches. American Journal of Orthopsychiatry, 85, 586 – 599. see eReading List

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 7 Begin Date: 27 Apr 2020

Module/Topic

Victim/survivors' help-seeking: Nature, extent and predictors

Chapter

Sardaryan, Y. (2017). Risk factors impeding help-seeking behaviors among victims of domestic violence. The European Journal of Public Health, 27. see eReading List

Douglas, H. (2017). Why are rates of domestic violence still so high? The Conversation. Retrieved from: https://theconversation.com/why-are-rates-of-domestic-violence-in-australia-still-so-high-87187

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 8 Begin Date: 04 May 2020

Module/Topic

Culturally specific considerations: Working with Indigenous and CALD victim/survivors

Chapter

Messing J. T., Campbell, J. C., & Snider, C. (2017). Validation and adaptation of the danger assessment 5: A brief intimate partner violence risk assessment. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 73. see eReading List


Messing, J. T. (2019). Risk-informed intervention: Using intimate partner violence risk assessment within an evidence-based practice framework. Social Work, 64, 103 - 112. see eReading List

Messing, J. T., Amanor-Boadu, Y., Cavanaugh, C. E., Glass, N. E., & Campbell, J. C. (2013). Culturally competent intimate partner violence risk assessment: Adapting the Danger Assessment for Immigrant Women. Social Work Research, 37, 263-275. Available from: https://academic.oup.com/swr/article/37/3/263/1673530

Events and Submissions/Topic

Portfolio Assessment due Tuesday, 05 May 2020


Portfolio Due: Week 8 Tuesday (5 May 2020) 11:45 pm AEST
Week 9 Begin Date: 11 May 2020

Module/Topic

Working with diverse victim/survivor populations: Understanding the role of age, gender, sexual orientation and identity

Chapter

Australia: LGBTIQ+ community standards up to domestic and family violence. see eReading List

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2018). Teen Dating Violence. Atlanta, GA: Author. Available from:

www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention/intimatepartnerviolence/teen-dating-violence.html

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 10 Begin Date: 18 May 2020

Module/Topic

Working with victim/survivors who are mothers: Considerations of the intersection of domestic and family violence and child safety

Chapter

Humphreys, C., Thiara, R. K., & Skamballis, A. (2011). Readiness to change: Mother-child relationship and domestic violence intervention. British Journal of Social Work, 41, 166-184. see eReading List

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 11 Begin Date: 25 May 2020

Module/Topic

Improving practice responses through staff/sector education and training

Chapter

Turner, W., Hester, M., Broad, J., Szilassy, E., Feder, G., Drinkwater, J., ... Stanley, N. (2017). Interventions to improve the response of professionals to children exposed to domestic violence and abuse: A systematic review. Child Abuse Review, 26, 19 - 39. see eReading List

Wakefield, S., & Taylor, A. (2015). Judicial education for domestic and family violence: State of knowledge paper. Landscapes, State of Knowledge, Issue 02. Alexandria, NSW: ANROWS. Available from: https://anrows.org.au/sites/default/files/150604%20CDFVR%20Judicial%20Landscapes.pdf

Events and Submissions/Topic

Assessment 3 due (academic essay)


Written Assessment (Academic Essay) Due: Week 11 Monday (25 May 2020) 11:45 pm AEST
Week 12 Begin Date: 01 Jun 2020

Module/Topic

Contemporary national and international approaches to working with victim/survivors

Chapter

Creedy, D. K., Baird, K., & Gillespie, K. (2019). A cross-sectional survey of pregnant women's perceptions of routine domestic and family violence screening and responses by midwives: Testing of three new tools. Women and Birth: Journal of the Australian College of Midwives. see eReading List

Alvarez, C., Fedock, G., Grace, K. T., & Campbell, J. (2017). Provider screening and counseling for Intimate Partner Violence: A systematic review of practices and influencing factors. Trauma, Violence, & Abuse, 18, 479–495.

Events and Submissions/Topic

Review/Exam Week Begin Date: 08 Jun 2020

Module/Topic

Chapter

Events and Submissions/Topic

Exam Week Begin Date: 15 Jun 2020

Module/Topic

Chapter

Events and Submissions/Topic

Assessment Tasks

1 Portfolio

Assessment Title
Portfolio -

Task Description

For this assignment you are asked to develop a factsheet addressing women of older age’s vulnerability to Domestic and Family Violence (DFV). Data identifying the nature and extent of ‘elder abuse’ remains limited. Reporting of this type of DFV affects a range of factors including the older person’s dependence on family members. The literature suggests that there are two overarching forms of elder abuse in the DFV context:

  • Intimate partner violence against older women
  • Abuse of elderly people by family members (e.g. children) or informal carers

For the purpose of this assignment you need to distinguish between the two types of elder abuse and communicate the following to readers in a factsheet:

  • Brief overview of the two types of elder abuse (here you should provide a brief description along with an identification of similarities and differences between the two types of elder abuse)
  • Identification of barriers to victims’ help-seeking/ access to relevant support (here you need to identify victim vulnerabilities along with perpetrator strategies of abuse and control)
  • Implications for practice (here you need to draw on research evidence around good practice and provide tangible examples of how services can address barriers to help-seeking and adequately meet victims’ needs)

You need to prepare a factsheet for mainstream service providers responding to a diverse range of victim/survivors of DFV. You should structure your factsheet under the above headings and address each type of elder abuse under them. Each heading should be addressed by drawing on empirical and theoretical evidence to demonstrate your ability to critically review and apply the relevant literature.

A minimum of eight academic references (i.e. journal articles) published 2015 or later should be incorporated. In addition, you may draw on Australian statistics from government websites (e.g. Australian Bureau of Statistics, Australian Institute of Health and Welfare).

The assignment should be presented as a Factsheet/Poster – illustrative and informative with text and pictures. A reference list should be incorporated.


Assessment Due Date

Week 5 Monday (6 Apr 2020) 11:45 pm AEST


Return Date to Students

Feedback will be provided within 10 working days of submission


Weighting
30%

Assessment Criteria

DFVP20006 – Portfolio Activity 1: Factsheet/Poster Elder Abuse
Fail Pass Credit Distinction High Distinction
Identification and appropriate comparison of the two types of elder abuse (20%) 0 – 9.5 Identification and definition and comparison of the two types of elder abuse is incomplete or absent 10 – 12.5 Attempt made to identify and compare the two types of elder abuse but limited 13 – 14.5 Identification and comparison of the two types of elder abuse presented with some detail 15 – 16.5 Provides insightful description and comparison of the two types of elder abuse 17 - 20 Provides elaborate description and comparison of the two types of elder abuse
Discussions of barriers to help-seeking and relevant service delivery established (20%) 0 – 9.5 Discussion of barriers to help-seeking and relevance to service delivery unclear or absent 10 – 12.5 Attempt made to discuss barriers to help-seeking including relevance to service delivery but general statements made 13 – 14.5 Discussion of barriers to help-seeking and relevance to service delivery appropriate with some detail 15 – 16.5 Excellent discussion of barriers to help-seeking and relevant service delivery (illustrative examples provided) 17 - 20 Outstanding discussion of barriers to help-seeking and key elements of service delivery with illustrative examples
Approach, Argument and Structure (40%) 0 – 19.5 Lacks logic and relevance, topic not appropriately addressed, absence of cohesion 20 – 25.5 Key elements are presented; content addresses the topic; appropriate structure; cohesion developing 26 – 29.5 Key elements are well presented; content addresses the topic, argument flows, relevance and cohesion is demonstrated 30 – 33.5 Effective presentation of key elements; argument flows and insight demonstrated, skillful cohesion and structure 34 - 40 Most effective presentation of key elements, excellent argumentation, great insight demonstrated with key issues well elaborated on; skillful cohesion and structure
Academic writing, paraphrasing, referencing (in-text and end-text) (20%) 0 – 9.5 Major difficulties, inappropriate paraphrasing and referencing 10 – 12.5 Some errors with writing and referencing – focus of attention is required to improve academic writing and referencing style 13 – 14.5 Good writing and referencing style– some minor errors (more careful editing is required) 15 – 16.5 Good academic writing and referencing style, (minor,insignificant errors) 17 - 20 Well written paper following all academic writing and referencing conventions – fully correct, no errors
Comments /100 /30%


Referencing Style

Submission
Online

Submission Instructions
Submission of the Portfolio is through the unit Moodle site, Turnitin submission point. Note that all assessments need to be attempted and a Cover Page is required. You are strongly encouraged to submit a draft prior to the due date to review your Turnitin report prior to making a final submission.

Learning Outcomes Assessed
  • Identify issues considered to be precipitants or causal factors in domestic and family violence victimology and how these intersect with gender, culture and ethnicity.
  • Evaluate the diversity of factors that influence program development and policies nationally and internationally in domestic and family violence contexts.
  • Evaluate specific system and program initiatives related to the provision of social services for victims of domestic and family violence in Queensland and Australia.


Graduate Attributes
  • Knowledge
  • Communication
  • Cognitive, technical and creative skills
  • Research
  • Self-management
  • Ethical and Professional Responsibility

2 Portfolio

Assessment Title
Portfolio

Task Description

For this assignment you are asked to write a Blog addressing the following questions:

1. How do causal factors of Domestic and Family Violence (DFV) intersect with culture, ethnicity and history among specifically vulnerable groups?

2. What are ethical and legal implications in DFV practice?

This assignment allows you to consider important issues in relation to history, intersectionality, gender-based violence in the family home, and guidelines to respond ethically as well as within a legal framework. You may demonstrate your knowledge of relevant legislation in your state.

Guidelines

For the purpose of this assignment you are asked to communicate the following information in the blog:

  • Appropriate title
  • Introductory paragraph (use appropriate references – hyperlinks are encouraged throughout the blog)
  • Section titles depending on the focus of your blog (which specific vulnerable group are you discussing?)
  • Legal considerations – provide specific legislation to be considered (e.g. mandatory reporting requirements)
  • Identification of ethical issues (and perhaps guidelines)
  • Recommendations for practitioners

You need to prepare a Blog for interested community members and practitioners in the field. You should structure your blog according to the guidelines above. You may hyperlink your references in-text, but please also provide a reference list at the end. Ensure that you answer both questions and include all elements in the Blog as outlined in the guidelines above.

A minimum of five appropriate references (i.e. journal articles, links to state legislation, ethical guidelines) should be incorporated. In addition, you may draw on Australian government websites (e.g. Australian Bureau of Statistics, Australian Institute of Health and Welfare).

The assignment should be presented as a Blog – informative and factual with text and references incorporated with a hyperlink. A reference list should be presented at the end.


Assessment Due Date

Week 8 Tuesday (5 May 2020) 11:45 pm AEST


Return Date to Students

Feedback will be provided within 10 working days of submission


Weighting
30%

Assessment Criteria

DFVP20006 – Portfolio Activity 2: Blog
Fail Pass Credit Distinction High Distinction
Overall impression – informative, aesthetically appealing, appropriately formatted (20%) 0 – 9.5 Lacks appropriate formatting, topic not addressed or incomplete, not aesthetically appealing 10 – 12.5 Vague or inconsistent description of vulnerable group, blog lacks coherence and focus 13 – 14.5 Clearly outlined focus with important information, appropriately presented as a blog 15 – 16.5 Effectively presented blog, very informative and aesthetically appealing presentation of the blog 17 - 20 Effectively and insightfully presented description, aesthetically appealing, demonstrating outstanding critical thinking
Knowledge of Content and Development of Blog (40%) 0 – 19.5 Unable to demonstrate understanding of content or only a few general points made, and/or factual errors presented 20 – 25.5 Demonstrated understanding of content (general points with little or no specific details given) and/or irrelevant information provided and/or inappropriate references used 26 – 29.5 Demonstrated understanding of content presented and most points were described with details; information is relevant supported by appropriate references; original thought presented 30 – 33.5 Demonstrated understanding of all content with all points were covered; effective links to cited references with original ideas and thoughts presented 34 - 40 Demonstrated well developed understanding of all content; insightful discussion, effective, clear & detailed information, many original thoughts & ideas, and effective links to cited references
Organisation including title, introductory paragraph, section titles and recommendations (20%) 0 – 9.5 Disorganised, little or no structure, or Jumps from topic to topic, and/or difficult to understand what is being argued, and/or missing introduction and/or recommendations 10 – 12.5 Appropriately organised: information mostly in logical order & argument flows; mostly adequate paragraph construction; appropriate introduction and recommendations 13 – 14.5 Adequate organisation: information in effective order and argument flows; paragraphs well constructed; adequate introduction and recommendations 15 – 16.5 Strong organisation: all information in effective order & argument flows well; all paragraphs well constructed; effective introduction and recommendations 17 - 20 Excellent organisation: argument flows powerfully and seamlessly; extremely well constructed paragraphs; highly effective introduction and recommendations
Academic writing, paraphrasing, referencing (in-text and end-text) (20%) 0 – 9.5 Major difficulties, inappropriate paraphrasing and referencing 10 – 12.5 Some errors with writing and referencing – focus of attention is required to improve academic writing and referencing style 13 – 14.5 Good writing and referencing style– some minor errors (more careful editing is required) 15 – 16.5 Good academic writing and referencing style, (minor,insignificant errors) 17 - 20 Well written paper following all academic writing and referencing conventions – fully correct, no errors
Comments /100 /30%


Referencing Style

Submission
Online

Submission Instructions
Submission of the Portfolio is through the unit Moodle site, Turnitin submission point. Note that all assessments need to be attempted and a Cover Page is required. You are strongly encouraged to submit a draft prior to the due date to review your Turnitin report prior to making a final submission.

Learning Outcomes Assessed
  • Examine safe approaches to working with victims/ survivors of domestic and family violence and ethical and legal implications in practice
  • Formulate safety and self-care plans for victim/survivors and those who work with them in domestic and family violence contexts.


Graduate Attributes
  • Knowledge
  • Communication
  • Cognitive, technical and creative skills
  • Research
  • Self-management
  • Ethical and Professional Responsibility

3 Written Assessment

Assessment Title
Written Assessment (Academic Essay)

Task Description

For this written assessment (academic essay), you are asked to identify and unpack the key features of vicarious trauma when working with victim/survivors of Domestic and Family Violence (DFV). Vicarious trauma is an important issue that impacts clients, frontline workers and employers. You will have the opportunity to demonstrate your knowledge and understanding of this concept as it relates to victim/survivors’ experiences of DFV and service delivery in this area.

You should review and analyse the relevant literature to address the following questions:

· What are key features of vicarious trauma?

· How does vicarious trauma impact victim/survivors?

· How does vicarious trauma impact workers?

· How does vicarious trauma impact employers?

· What are implications for service delivery?

A minimum of six academic references (i.e. journal articles) published 2015 or later are required for this assessment piece. In addition, you may draw on Australian statistics from government websites (e.g. Australian Bureau of Statistics, Australian Institute of Health and Welfare).

The assignment should be presented in essay format using Times News Roman 12 point font with 1.5 spacing. You should provide a brief introduction to the topic with a definition of the term ‘vicarious trauma’, a discussion of issues as presented above (addressing all the questions), linked to the relevance of service delivery, and concluding remarks where you summarise the key points and provides suggestions for future directions.


Assessment Due Date

Week 11 Monday (25 May 2020) 11:45 pm AEST


Return Date to Students

Feedback will be provided within 10 working days of submission


Weighting
40%

Assessment Criteria

DFVP20006 – Written Assessment: Vicarious Trauma
Fail Pass Credit Distinction High Distinction
Identification and appropriate definition of the concept (20%) 0 – 9.5 Identification and definition vicarious trauma in the context of working with victim/survivors of DFV is absent 10 – 12.5 Attempt made to identify and define vicarious trauma in the context of DFV but limited 13 – 14.5 Identification and definition of vicarious trauma presented with reference to DFV 15 – 16.5 Provides insightful description and definition of vicarious trauma in the context of DFV 17 - 20 Provides elaborate description and most appropriate definition of vicarious trauma in the context of DFV
All questions answered and relevance to service delivery established (20%) 0 – 9.5 Discussion of some questions including relevance to service delivery unclear or absent 10 – 12.5 Attempt made to discuss all questions including relevance to service delivery but general statements made 13 – 14.5 All questions answered appropriately with focus on practice 15 – 16.5 Excellent answers provided with relevant practice elements of service delivery (illustrative examples provided) 17 - 20 Outstanding answers provided outlining key relevant practice elements with illustrative examples
Approach, Argument and Structure (40%) 0 – 19.5 Lacks logic and relevance, topic not appropriately addressed, absence of cohesion 20 – 25.5 Key elements are presented; content addresses the topic; appropriate structure; cohesion developing 26 – 29.5 Key elements are well presented; content addresses the topic, argument flows, relevance and cohesion is demonstrated 30 – 33.5 Effective presentation of key elements; argument flows and insight demonstrated, skillful cohesion and structure 34 - 40 Most effective presentation of key elements, excellent argumentation, great insight demonstrated with key issues well elaborated on; skillful cohesion and structure
Academic writing, paraphrasing, referencing (in-text and end-text) (20%) 0 – 9.5 Major difficulties, inappropriate paraphrasing and referencing 10 – 12.5 Some errors with writing and referencing – focus of attention is required to improve academic writing and referencing style 13 – 14.5 Good writing and referencing style– some minor errors (more careful editing is required) 15 – 16.5 Good academic writing and referencing style, (minor,insignificant errors) 17 - 20 Well written paper following all academic writing and referencing conventions – fully correct, no errors
Comments /100 /40%


Referencing Style

Submission
Online

Submission Instructions
Submission of the Written Assessment is through the unit Moodle site, Turnitin submission point. Note that all assessments need to be attempted and a Cover Page is required. You are strongly encouraged to submit a draft prior to the due date to review your Turnitin report prior to making a final submission.

Learning Outcomes Assessed
  • Examine safe approaches to working with victims/ survivors of domestic and family violence and ethical and legal implications in practice
  • Identify issues considered to be precipitants or causal factors in domestic and family violence victimology and how these intersect with gender, culture and ethnicity.
  • Formulate safety and self-care plans for victim/survivors and those who work with them in domestic and family violence contexts.
  • Evaluate the diversity of factors that influence program development and policies nationally and internationally in domestic and family violence contexts.
  • Evaluate specific system and program initiatives related to the provision of social services for victims of domestic and family violence in Queensland and Australia.


Graduate Attributes
  • Knowledge
  • Communication
  • Cognitive, technical and creative skills
  • Research

Academic Integrity Statement

As a CQUniversity student you are expected to act honestly in all aspects of your academic work.

Any assessable work undertaken or submitted for review or assessment must be your own work. Assessable work is any type of work you do to meet the assessment requirements in the unit, including draft work submitted for review and feedback and final work to be assessed.

When you use the ideas, words or data of others in your assessment, you must thoroughly and clearly acknowledge the source of this information by using the correct referencing style for your unit. Using others’ work without proper acknowledgement may be considered a form of intellectual dishonesty.

Participating honestly, respectfully, responsibly, and fairly in your university study ensures the CQUniversity qualification you earn will be valued as a true indication of your individual academic achievement and will continue to receive the respect and recognition it deserves.

As a student, you are responsible for reading and following CQUniversity’s policies, including the Student Academic Integrity Policy and Procedure. This policy sets out CQUniversity’s expectations of you to act with integrity, examples of academic integrity breaches to avoid, the processes used to address alleged breaches of academic integrity, and potential penalties.

What is a breach of academic integrity?

A breach of academic integrity includes but is not limited to plagiarism, self-plagiarism, collusion, cheating, contract cheating, and academic misconduct. The Student Academic Integrity Policy and Procedure defines what these terms mean and gives examples.

Why is academic integrity important?

A breach of academic integrity may result in one or more penalties, including suspension or even expulsion from the University. It can also have negative implications for student visas and future enrolment at CQUniversity or elsewhere. Students who engage in contract cheating also risk being blackmailed by contract cheating services.

Where can I get assistance?

For academic advice and guidance, the Academic Learning Centre (ALC) can support you in becoming confident in completing assessments with integrity and of high standard.

What can you do to act with integrity?