CQUniversity Unit Profile
DFVP20010 Integrated Services and Systems for Men's Behaviour Change
Integrated Services and Systems for Men's Behaviour Change
All details in this unit profile for DFVP20010 have been officially approved by CQUniversity and represent a learning partnership between the University and you (our student).
The information will not be changed unless absolutely necessary and any change will be clearly indicated by an approved correction included in the profile.
General Information

Overview

This unit builds your understanding of domestic and family violence as you learn about perpetrator behaviour change at a strategic level, exploring the systems and services associated with family safety. Linkages with other sectors, such as mental health and alcohol and drug services, are critical in this field. You will develop your understanding of the relevance of these and other services to perpetrator behaviour change and formulate strategies which align with these services. Systemic and integrated responses for specific groups, such as Culturally and Linguistically Diverse and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander clients are key areas of knowledge and are integrated into this unit. Policies and practice are examined through the application of evidence-based tools of analysis to identify and address issues related to working with users of violence. You will also focus on the establishment and practice of skills required for effective group-work with perpetrators, advancing your knowledge of group dynamics and processes.

Details

Career Level: Postgraduate
Unit Level: Level 8
Credit Points: 6
Student Contribution Band: 10
Fraction of Full-Time Student Load: 0.125

Pre-requisites or Co-requisites

There are no requisites for this unit.

Important note: Students enrolled in a subsequent unit who failed their pre-requisite unit, should drop the subsequent unit before the census date or within 10 working days of Fail grade notification. Students who do not drop the unit in this timeframe cannot later drop the unit without academic and financial liability. See details in the Assessment Policy and Procedure (Higher Education Coursework).

Offerings For Term 2 - 2019

Online

Attendance Requirements

All on-campus students are expected to attend scheduled classes – in some units, these classes are identified as a mandatory (pass/fail) component and attendance is compulsory. International students, on a student visa, must maintain a full time study load and meet both attendance and academic progress requirements in each study period (satisfactory attendance for International students is defined as maintaining at least an 80% attendance record).

Class and Assessment Overview

Recommended Student Time Commitment

Each 6-credit Postgraduate unit at CQUniversity requires an overall time commitment of an average of 12.5 hours of study per week, making a total of 150 hours for the unit.

Class Timetable

Bundaberg, Cairns, Emerald, Gladstone, Mackay, Rockhampton, Townsville
Adelaide, Brisbane, Melbourne, Perth, Sydney

Assessment Overview

1. Written Assessment
Weighting: 30%
2. Practical Assessment
Weighting: 30%
3. Portfolio
Weighting: 40%

Assessment Grading

This is a graded unit: your overall grade will be calculated from the marks or grades for each assessment task, based on the relative weightings shown in the table above. You must obtain an overall mark for the unit of at least 50%, or an overall grade of ‘pass’ in order to pass the unit. If any ‘pass/fail’ tasks are shown in the table above they must also be completed successfully (‘pass’ grade). You must also meet any minimum mark requirements specified for a particular assessment task, as detailed in the ‘assessment task’ section (note that in some instances, the minimum mark for a task may be greater than 50%). Consult the University’s Grades and Results Policy for more details of interim results and final grades.

Previous Student Feedback

Feedback, Recommendations and Responses

Every unit is reviewed for enhancement each year. At the most recent review, the following staff and student feedback items were identified and recommendations were made.

Feedback from student survey responses

Feedback

The majority of the student comments reinforced current practices and revolved around: - Lecturer features: Approachable and supportive, knowledgeable, tailored attention, informative regarding online navigation - Appropriateness of teaching content: Breadth and level

Recommendation

Maintain the existing approaches and strategies

Feedback from student survey responses

Feedback

"Video creation difficult and achieved after extensive consultation with IT"

Recommendation

After reflection and consultation I have concluded that mastering such contemporary competencies is a reasonable requirement and a relevant assessable aspect of this skill-based unit.

Unit Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this unit, you will be able to:
  1. Critique contemporary policy and practice approaches, including integrated response models, for working with perpetrators of domestic violence
  2. Apply systems-based tools of analysis to design a set of considerations for working with men to achieve family safety outcomes
  3. Formulate strategies which align with relevant systems and services to meet the needs of men from culturally diverse groups
  4. Interpret and communicate professional knowledge of the dynamics and processes of men’s behaviour change groups
  5. Demonstrate skills for use in group settings which facilitate perpetrator behaviour change.
Alignment of Learning Outcomes, Assessment and Graduate Attributes
N/A Level
Introductory Level
Intermediate Level
Graduate Level
Professional Level
Advanced Level

Alignment of Assessment Tasks to Learning Outcomes

Assessment Tasks Learning Outcomes
1 2 3 4 5
1 - Written Assessment - 30%
2 - Practical Assessment - 30%
3 - Portfolio - 40%

Alignment of Graduate Attributes to Learning Outcomes

Graduate Attributes Learning Outcomes
1 2 3 4 5
1 - Knowledge
2 - Communication
3 - Cognitive, technical and creative skills
4 - Research
5 - Self-management
6 - Ethical and Professional Responsibility
7 - Leadership

Alignment of Assessment Tasks to Graduate Attributes

Assessment Tasks Graduate Attributes
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
1 - Written Assessment - 30%
2 - Practical Assessment - 30%
3 - Portfolio - 40%
Textbooks and Resources

Textbooks

Prescribed

BECOMING ETHICAL: A PARALLEL, POLITICAL JOURNEYWITH MEN WHO HAVE ABUSED (2009)

Authors: ALAN JENKINS
Russell House
LYME REGIS LYME REGIS , UK
ISBN: 978-1-905541-40-9
Binding: Paperback

IT Resources

You will need access to the following IT resources:
  • CQUniversity Student Email
  • Internet
  • Unit Website (Moodle)
  • Access to webcam or other video recording device for assessable presentation
Referencing Style

All submissions for this unit must use the referencing style: American Psychological Association 6th Edition (APA 6th edition)

For further information, see the Assessment Tasks.

Teaching Contacts
Brian Sullivan Unit Coordinator
b.sullivan@cqu.edu.au
Schedule
Week 1 Begin Date: 15 Jul 2019

Module/Topic

Re-introduction: Men's behaviour change in a domestic and family violence system

Chapter

Lawson, D. (2015). Treatment for intimate violent offenders. In: Family Violence Explanations and Evidence-Based Clinical Practice (pp. 117-138). Hoboken, NJ: Wiley

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 2 Begin Date: 22 Jul 2019

Module/Topic

Finding a place in the system: Inclusive practices

Chapter

Flood, M. (2016). Involving men in ending violence against women: Facing challenges and making change. Graduate Journal Of Social Science, 12(3), 12-29.

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 3 Begin Date: 29 Jul 2019

Module/Topic

What works in small group practice with offenders

Chapter

Frost, A., Ware, J. & Boer, D. (2009). An integrated groupwork methodology for working with sex offenders. Journal of Sexual Aggression, 15 (1), pp. 2-38.

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 4 Begin Date: 05 Aug 2019

Module/Topic

Group practice 1: A change-generating system

Chapter

Donigan, J., & Malnati, R. (2006). Group processes within a systems framework and the three elements that constitute a group. In: Systemic Group Therapy: A Triadic Model (pp.1-14). Mason, OH: Cengage.

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 5 Begin Date: 12 Aug 2019

Module/Topic

Group practice 2: Connecting the parts

Chapter

Kline, W.B. (2003). Basic skills and interventions. In: Interactive Group Counseling and Therapy (pp. 175-207). Columbus: Merill Prentice Hall.

Events and Submissions/Topic

Critical Incident Report Due: Week 5 Monday (12 Aug 2019) 5:00 pm AEST
Vacation Week Begin Date: 19 Aug 2019

Module/Topic

Chapter

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 6 Begin Date: 26 Aug 2019

Module/Topic

Group practice 3: The here & now

Chapter

Bulman, J. & Hayes, R. (2015). Deadly groups: Aboriginal men’s groups. In Groupwork in Australia (Volume 1, pp. 227-237). Sydney, NSW: Institute of Group Leaders.

Events and Submissions/Topic

Written assessment

Week 7 Begin Date: 02 Sep 2019

Module/Topic

Local context & setting: Connecting systems

Chapter

Kurst-Swanger, K. (2008). Multi-disciplinary working. In: J. Keeling & T. Mason (Eds.) (pp. 117-125), Domestic Violence: A Multi-Professional Approach For Health Professionals. Maidenhead, UK: Open University Press.

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 8 Begin Date: 09 Sep 2019

Module/Topic

Restorative & restitutional practice skills

Chapter

Jenkins, A. (2009). Restitution practices. In Becoming Ethical: A parallel, political journey with men who have abused. (pp. 133-137). Lyme Regis, UK: Russel House.

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 9 Begin Date: 16 Sep 2019

Module/Topic

Collaborative practice 1: Referral & liaison

Chapter

France, K., & Weikel, K. (2014). Creating positive relationships. In: Helping Skills For Human Service Workers Building Relationships and Encouraging Productive Change (3rd ed., pp. 55-83). Springfield, IL: Charles C. Thomas

Events and Submissions/Topic

Practical assessment

Week 10 Begin Date: 23 Sep 2019

Module/Topic

Collaborative practice 2: Interagency partnership practice

Chapter

Cosh, A., & Carslaw, H. (2016). Domestic violence and abuse. InnovAiT, 9 (7), 404-412.

UK Home Office (2014) Coordinated Community Response Model Online Toolkit. (2014). Agencies to assist survivors. Retrieved from: www.ccrm.org.uk/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=151&Itemid=214.

Events and Submissions/Topic

Practical Assessment Due: Week 10 Monday (23 Sept 2019) 5:00 pm AEST
Week 11 Begin Date: 30 Sep 2019

Module/Topic

Reflexivity and practice

Chapter

Yip, K. (2006). Self-reflection in Reflective Practice: A Note of Caution. The British Journal of Social Work, 36(5), 777-788.

Frost, A. (2015) Supervision. In O’Sullivan, K., King, A. & Nove, T. (Eds) Group work in Australia (pp.300-316). Sydney, NSW: Institute of Group Leaders.

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 12 Begin Date: 07 Oct 2019

Module/Topic

Summarising the journey

Chapter

Reflective Journal (as compiled by the student)

Events and Submissions/Topic

Portfolio


Reflective Journal Due: Week 12 Friday (11 Oct 2019) 5:00 pm AEST
Review/Exam Week Begin Date: 14 Oct 2019

Module/Topic

Chapter

Events and Submissions/Topic

Exam Week Begin Date: 21 Oct 2019

Module/Topic

Chapter

Events and Submissions/Topic

Assessment Tasks

1 Written Assessment

Assessment Title
Critical Incident Report

Task Description

Assess No. 1
Type Written Assessment
Learning Outcomes assessed

1. Critique contemporary policy and practice approaches, including integrated response models, for working with perpetrators of domestic violence
2. Apply systems-based tools of analysis to design a set of considerations for working with men to achieve family safety outcomes
3. Formulate strategies that align with relevant systems and services to meet the needs of men from culturally diverse groups
4. Interpret and communicate professional knowledge of the dynamics and processes of men’s behaviour change groups
Word Limit 1,500 (+/- 10%)
Total Percentage 30%
Details Assessment 1: Report

Overview
You are required to write a critical incident analysis report. This should be based on the occurrence of a critical incident (as defined in the unit) from your own observation of group practice in your student/work setting.

Intention
This task presents the opportunity for you to apply your knowledge of small-group dynamics and processes of change in respect of group practice. The nature of this application relates to your understanding of what constitutes a critical incident in the broad context of men’s behaviour change and in the particular setting of the group you are observing. Your analysis will take into account the significance of the incident in relation to the content requirements below.

Content
Your report should contain reference to the following factors:
• contemporary practice approaches and tools of analysis
• considerations and planning for working with men to achieve family safety outcomes
• strategies that meet the needs of men from culturally diverse groups
• knowledge of the dynamics and processes of men’s behaviour change groups

Procedure
1. Identify and describe the critical incident
2. Deduce from your understanding of group practice and theory how you came to determine this ‘incident’ as ‘critical’
3. Briefly describe the responses of others (active or passive) at the time and the impact of this
4. Speculate on how this incident and its handling might impact on the group process and subsequent intervention

You should apply your focus to the group ‘system’ elements as outlined in classes (especially, Donigan & Malnati, 2006).

You should include at least five references in your report. At least three of these should be academic references based on empirical and/ or theoretical examinations of the practice and safety issues. Remaining references may be from the grey literature or culturally-related sources.

Reference
Donigan, J., & Malnati, R. (2006). Group processes within a systems framework and the three elements that constitute a group. In: Systemic Group Therapy: A Triadic Model (pp.1-14). Mason, OH: Cengage.


Notes to Students: It is expected that students enrolled in this unit will have connections with ‘men’s behaviour change’ services through professional practice networks. Your journal will reflect your work through that association.

Overall, this assessment item provides you with the opportunity to deductively apply principles from relevant literature and link these to your current or future practice.

All assessment-related information is also made available on the unit Moodle site under the ‘ASSESSMENT’ section. You will also find a link to a monitored discussion board specifically designed for questions relating to each assessment item on the unit Moodle site. You are encouraged to monitor the unit Moodle site and your student emails for assessment-related information.

Referencing
The preferred style for CQUniversity School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Sciences is American Psychological Association (APA) referencing. A guide to APA referencing can be accessed here.

Criteria Provided via Moodle
Feedback Provided via Moodle


Assessment Due Date

Week 5 Monday (12 Aug 2019) 5:00 pm AEST


Return Date to Students

Week 7 Monday (2 Sept 2019)


Weighting
30%

Assessment Criteria

HD D C P F
Structure (10%)
Excellent presentation of report, double-spaced 12-point font. Consistently accurate with spelling, grammar and paragraph structure. Well-presented report, double-spaced 12-point font. 1 or 2 errors spelling, grammar and paragraph structure. Well-presented rationale, double -spaced with 12-point font. 3 or 4 consistent errors with spelling, grammar and paragraph structure. Well-presented rationale, double-spaced 12-point font. 3 or 4 inconsistent errors with spelling, grammar and paragraph structure. Poorly presented rationale. Double-spacing 12-point font not used Many inaccuracies with spelling, grammar and paragraph structure. (> 5 errors).
Approach and Deduction (80%)
Content is entirely relevant to the report requirements, the approach comprehensively addresses the task (content and procedure elements). The content presentation is logical and is within the set word limit. Content is very relevant to the report requirements, the approach clearly addresses the task. The content presentation is logical and is within the set word limit. Content is appropriate to the report requirements, the approach mostly addresses the task. For the most part, the content presentation is logical and is within the set word limit. Content addresses the report requirements but may be repetitive or lack cohesion. Within the set word limit with a 10% allowance (under or over the set limit). Content is irrelevant and or does not address the report fails to meet requirements. The word limit has not been adhered to: well outside the 10% allowance.
Referencing (10%)
Consistently integrates well-chosen references to support and reflect all ideas, factual information and quotations. Generally integrates well-chosen references to support and reflect ideas, factual information and quotations, with 1 or 2 exceptions. Partly integrates well-chosen references to support and reflect ideas, factual information and quotations, with 3 or 4 exceptions. Occasionally integrates well-chosen references to support and reflect ideas, factual information and quotations, with 5 or 6 exceptions. Fails to or infrequently attempts (>7 errors) to integrate well-chosen references to support and reflect ideas, factual information and quotations.
Consistently accurate with referencing. A minimum of 5 references used including journal articles, govt. publications, grey literature and practice principles. 1 or 2 consistent referencing errors identified. A minimum of 5 references including journal articles, govt. publications, grey literature and practice principles. 3 or 4 consistent referencing errors identified. A minimum of 5 references used including journal articles, govt. publications, grey literature, practice guidelines and practice principles. 3 or 4 inconsistent referencing errors identified. A minimum of 5 references used including journal articles, govt. publications, grey literature and practice principles. Many inaccuracies with referencing (>5). Less than 5 references used. Few or no journal articles sourced. Assignment relies heavily on web-site information.


Referencing Style

Submission
Online

Learning Outcomes Assessed
  • Critique contemporary policy and practice approaches, including integrated response models, for working with perpetrators of domestic violence
  • Apply systems-based tools of analysis to design a set of considerations for working with men to achieve family safety outcomes
  • Formulate strategies which align with relevant systems and services to meet the needs of men from culturally diverse groups
  • Interpret and communicate professional knowledge of the dynamics and processes of men’s behaviour change groups


Graduate Attributes
  • Knowledge
  • Communication
  • Cognitive, technical and creative skills
  • Research
  • Ethical and Professional Responsibility

2 Practical Assessment

Assessment Title
Practical Assessment

Task Description

Assess No. 2
Type Practical assessment
Learning Outcomes assessed 5) Demonstrate skills for use in group settings which facilitate perpetrator behaviour change.
Word Limit 1,500 words (+/- 10%)
Total % 30%

Overview
Present a 10 -15-minute demonstration of facilitated group interaction (in which you roleplay the group’s facilitator), followed by a critical review of your performance in that role. It is this critical review report that is the subject of formal assessment.

Intention
This task offers you the opportunity to demonstrate your practice skills in managing group process in relation to a task.

Content and format
• The format for presenting the group facilitation is by video file (see technical guidance and requirements below)
• The format for the critical analysis is in the form of a brief report (see word limit above)
• Your group should comprise 5 - 7 members, PLUS you as the facilitator
• You should assign the group a definable and explicit task (e.g., debating a specific topic), which should be made clear at the outset of the recorded interaction.
• The segment should exemplify your familiarity with, and beginning competence in, the following intervention skills as referred to in the unit:
1. topic adherence
2. participation
3. (where relevant) elicit sharing, clarify contributions, and connect group members (see Kline, 2003)
4. summarising

Technical guidance and requirements
Ensure the voice of each participant is audible (and visible if possible).
As facilitator, ensure your voice is audible and your image apparent.
The recording can be made via the university’s Zoom software by means of a webcam/microphone and uploaded as a compatible file through Moodle.
Information about more specific file parameters and requirements will be made explicit through Moodle.

Your focus should be principally on the process of the interaction.

Your accompanying critical review (report) should include:
• Arguments in support of your interventions, and, where appropriate, your choices not to intervene
• Comments that reflect attempts to promote effective, safe, and responsible -participation
• Reflections on any behavioural indicators that participants might be prompted to change in response to intervention or group interaction
• Instances of interventions (or absence of intervention) that you would change, and the reasons for the changes, were you to repeat the exercise.

Substantiate your comments with reference to the literature.

Make sure you adhere to the requirements contained in the Report-Writing Guide in the ASSESSMENT section of the unit’s Moodle site.

You should include at least five references in your report. At least three of these should be academic references based on empirical and/ or theoretical examinations of the practice and safety issues. Remaining references may be from the grey literature or culturally-related sources.

Reference
Kline, W.B. (2003). Basic skills and interventions. In: Interactive Group Counseling and Therapy (pp. 175-207). Columbus, OH: Merill Prentice Hall.
Notes to Students Practical assessment activities are designed to reflect skills required in professional practice and involve different types of learning and assessment. They provide students with an opportunity to demonstrate a range of different skills, including ways of applying knowledge and attributes. These activities allow you to engage with and respond to scenarios similar to those encountered in practice experience. This activity provides you with the opportunity to deductively apply principles from the relevant literature and link these to your current or future practice.

For the purpose of this exercise, assemble a group of adult persons you know who are appropriately informed of the context and willing to participate in this exercise as member of ‘your’ group. These persons might wish to adopt alias names and/or identities for the purpose of the exercise. Ensure they have an opportunity to talk about the experience following the conclusion of the roleplay.

Specific and detailed criteria for your critical review will be made available on the unit Moodle site, along with all other assessment-related information, under the ‘ASSESSMENT’ section. You will also find a link to a monitored discussion board specifically designed for questions relating to each assessment item on the unit Moodle site. You are encouraged to monitor the unit Moodle site and your student emails for assessment-related information.

Referencing
The preferred style for CQUniversity School of Nursing and Midwifery is American Psychological Association (APA) referencing. A guide to APA referencing can be accessed here.

Criteria Provided via Moodle
Feedback Provided via Moodle


Assessment Due Date

Week 10 Monday (23 Sept 2019) 5:00 pm AEST

Please note that this is the deadline for both the word file and accompanying video file


Return Date to Students

Review/Exam Week Monday (14 Oct 2019)


Weighting
30%

Assessment Criteria

HD D C P F
Structure (20%)
Excellent presentation of report, double-spaced 12-point font. Consistently accurate with spelling, grammar and paragraph structure. Accurately meets requirements of the Report-Writing Guide. Well-presented report, double-spaced 12-point font. 1 or 2 errors spelling, grammar and paragraph structure. Accurately meets requirements of the Report-Writing Guide. Well-presented report, double -spaced with 12-point font. 3 or 4 consistent errors with spelling, grammar and paragraph structure. Adequately meets requirements of the Report-Writing Guide. Well-presented report, double-spaced 12-point font. 3 or 4 inconsistent errors with spelling, grammar and paragraph structure. Marginally meets requirements of the Report-Writing Guide. Poorly presented report. Double-spacing 12-point font not used. Many inaccuracies with spelling, grammar and paragraph structure. (> 5 errors). Fails to meet requirements of the Report-Writing Guide.
Critical appraisal of performance (70%)
Content is entirely relevant to the report requirements, the report comprehensively addresses the task. The content presentation is logical and is within the set word limit. Content is very relevant to the report requirements, the report clearly addresses the task. The content presentation is logical and is within the set word limit. Content is appropriate to the report requirements, the report mostly addresses the task. For the most part, the content presentation is logical and is within the set word limit. Content addresses the report requirements but may be repetitive or lack cohesion. Within the set word limit with a 10% allowance (under or over the set limit). Content is irrelevant and or does not address the report fails to meet requirements. The word limit has not been adhered to: well outside the 10% allowance
Referencing (10%)
Consistently integrates well-chosen references to support and reflect all ideas, factual information and quotations. Generally integrates well-chosen references to support and reflect ideas, factual information and quotations, with 1 or 2 exceptions. Partly integrates well-chosen references to support and reflect ideas, factual information and quotations, with 3 or 4 exceptions. Occasionally integrates well-chosen references to support and reflect ideas, factual information and quotations, with 5 or 6 exceptions. Fails to or infrequently attempts (>7 errors) to integrate well-chosen references to support and reflect ideas, factual information and quotations.
Consistently accurate with referencing. A minimum of 5 references used including journal articles, govt. publications, grey literature and practice principles. 1 or 2 consistent referencing errors identified. A minimum of 5 references including journal articles, govt. publications, grey literature and practice principles. 3 or 4 consistent referencing errors identified. A minimum of 5 references used including journal articles, govt. publications, grey literature, practice guidelines and practice principles. 3 or 4 inconsistent referencing errors identified. A minimum of 5 references used including journal articles, govt. publications, grey literature and practice principles. Many inaccuracies with referencing (>5). Less than 5 references used. Few or no journal articles sourced. Assignment relies heavily on web-site information.


Referencing Style

Submission
Online

Submission Instructions
Technical guidelines for producingh and uploading the video file will be avaiable on Moodle

Learning Outcomes Assessed
  • Demonstrate skills for use in group settings which facilitate perpetrator behaviour change.


Graduate Attributes
  • Knowledge
  • Communication
  • Cognitive, technical and creative skills
  • Self-management
  • Ethical and Professional Responsibility
  • Leadership

3 Portfolio

Assessment Title
Reflective Journal

Task Description

Assess No. 3
Type Portfolio
Learning Outcomes assessed 1. Critique contemporary policy and practice approaches, including integrated response models, for working with perpetrators of domestic violence
2. Apply systems-based tools of analysis to design a set of considerations for working with men to achieve family safety outcomes
3. Formulate strategies which align with relevant systems and services to meet the needs of men from culturally diverse groups
4. Interpret and communicate professional knowledge of the dynamics and processes of men’s behaviour change groups
Word Limit 3,000 (+/- 10%)
Total Percentage 40%
Details Reflective journal

Overview and background
Create and maintain a reflective journal of your experiences of your encounters with the range of systems with which your associated men’s behaviour change program (MBCP) is engaged over the course of your study in this unit.

As well as conducting direct MBC intervention, relevant standards in Australia require that MBCPs collaborate – with women’s advocate groups, child-protection systems, police, courts, probations services, addictions services, and so on – as integrated safety response systems based on the principle of the “coordinated community response” (Gondolf, 2012).

Your capacity to critically reflect on the nature and qualities of these relationships through your encounters with groups and other systems in the course of your study in this unit is critically relevant to a range of its learning outcomes.

This task involves regular (at least weekly) entries into a self-compiled journal. This is intended to support and consolidate your learning by synthesising the range of competencies relevant to the unit.

New learning is often referred to using the metaphor of a journey. The reflective journal offers a means of documenting milestones on that journey and opportunities to incorporate feedback along the way. Competence in this self-awareness and consolidation of attitudes consistent with practice in this work are assessable attributes.

Process and content
Your reflective journal should include and synthesise:
• An account of the application of group intervention and system-based strategies in a process of developing your knowledge, attitudes, and skills
• the impact of experiences on learning and self-management as a safe and effective practitioner
• reference to a dynamic model of experiential learning for practice (such as the description by Frost, 2015)
• reflections on relevant practice frameworks, methods, and strategies, along with relevant professional requirements.
• Comment on the capacity of the systems and services encountered to meet the needs of men from culturally diverse groups and to counter oppression related to domestic and family violence.

Format
The format of the journal is flexible and can reflect the cultures, idioms, and meaning-making that you bring to the learning for this unit. Your text may be illustrated with or by reference to artwork, audio, or video material. Please consult the course coordinator if you are unsure about the appropriateness of media.

You should include at least ten references in your journal. At least six of these should be academic references based on empirical and/ or theoretical examinations of the issues implicit in this statement. Remaining references may be sources from the grey literature or culturally-based sources.

References
Frost, A. (2015) Supervision. In O’Sullivan, K., King, A. & Nove, T. (Eds) Group work in Australia (pp.300-316). Sydney, NSW: Institute of Group Leaders.
Gondolf, E. W. (2012). The future of batterer programs. Boston, MA: Northeastern University Press.


Notes to Students It is expected that students enrolled in this unit will have connections with ‘men’s behaviour change’ services through professional practice networks. Your journal will reflect your work through that association.

Portfolio activities consist of different types of learning and assessment. They provide students with an opportunity to demonstrate a range of different skills, including different ways of researching, compiling and presenting information and acquired knowledge.

Overall, this assessment item provides you with the opportunity to explore and monitor your personal-professional progress in relation to the teaching material underpinning the unit and link this to your current or future practice.

All assessment-related information is also made available on the unit Moodle site under the ‘ASSESSMENT’ section. You will also find a link to a monitored discussion board specifically designed for questions relating to each assessment item on the unit Moodle site. You are encouraged to monitor the unit Moodle site and your student emails for assessment-related information.

Referencing
The preferred style for CQUniversity School of Nursing and Midwifery is American Psychological Association (APA) referencing. A guide to APA referencing can be accessed here.

Criteria Provided via Moodle
Feedback Students will have the opportunity to submit their journals for non-evaluative feedback between weeks 4 and 7 inclusive
All feedback provided via Moodle


Assessment Due Date

Week 12 Friday (11 Oct 2019) 5:00 pm AEST

Please note there is provision for non-evaluative feedback prior to submission of this assessment


Return Date to Students

Exam Week Monday (21 Oct 2019)


Weighting
40%

Assessment Criteria

HD D C P F
Structure (10%)
Excellent presentation of material, in double-spaced 12-point font. Consistently accurate with spelling, grammar and paragraph structure. Well-presented report, double-spaced 12-point font. 1 or 2 errors spelling, grammar and paragraph structure. Well-presented rationale, double -spaced with 12-point font. 3 or 4 consistent errors with spelling, grammar and paragraph structure. Well-presented rationale, double-spaced 12-point font. 3 or 4 inconsistent errors with spelling, grammar and paragraph structure Poorly presented rationale. Double-spacing 12-point font not used Many inaccuracies with spelling, grammar and paragraph structure. (> 5 errors).
Compilation and reflection (80%)
Content relevance is entirely justified in the text and meets all process and content requirements of the task. The written content presentation is logical and is within the set word limit. Content relevance is mostly justified in the text, and clearly addresses process and content requirements of the task. The written content presentation is logical and is within the set word limit. Content relevance is appropriately justified in the text, and meets the majority of process and content requirements of the task. The written content presentation is logical and is within the set word limit. Content is relevant entirely justified in the text, and generally meets process and content requirements of the task. The written content presentation is reasonable and is within the set word limit. Content lacks relevance, is not justified in the text, and fails to meet process and content requirements of the task. The written content presentation lacks coherence and is well outside the set word limit.
Referencing (10%)
Consistently integrates well-chosen references to support and reflect all ideas, factual information and quotations. Generally integrates well-chosen references to support and reflect ideas, factual information and quotations, with 1 or 2 exceptions. Partly integrates well-chosen references to support and reflect ideas, factual information and quotations, with 3 or 4 exceptions. Occasionally integrates well-chosen references to support and reflect ideas, factual information and quotations, with 5 or 6 exceptions. Fails to or infrequently attempts (>7 errors) to integrate well-chosen references to support and reflect ideas, factual information and quotations.
Consistently accurate with referencing. A minimum of 5 references used including journal articles, govt. publications, grey literature and practice principles. 1 or 2 consistent referencing errors identified. A minimum of 5 references including journal articles, govt. publications, grey literature and practice principles. 3 or 4 consistent referencing errors identified. A minimum of 5 references used including journal articles, govt. publications, grey literature, practice guidelines and practice principles. 3 or 4 inconsistent referencing errors identified. A minimum of 5 references used including journal articles, govt. publications, grey literature and practice principles. Many inaccuracies with referencing (>5). Less than 5 references used. Few or no journal articles sourced. Assignment relies heavily on web-site information.


Referencing Style

Submission
Online

Learning Outcomes Assessed
  • Critique contemporary policy and practice approaches, including integrated response models, for working with perpetrators of domestic violence
  • Apply systems-based tools of analysis to design a set of considerations for working with men to achieve family safety outcomes
  • Formulate strategies which align with relevant systems and services to meet the needs of men from culturally diverse groups
  • Interpret and communicate professional knowledge of the dynamics and processes of men’s behaviour change groups


Graduate Attributes
  • Knowledge
  • Communication
  • Cognitive, technical and creative skills
  • Research
  • Ethical and Professional Responsibility

Academic Integrity Statement

As a CQUniversity student you are expected to act honestly in all aspects of your academic work.

Any assessable work undertaken or submitted for review or assessment must be your own work. Assessable work is any type of work you do to meet the assessment requirements in the unit, including draft work submitted for review and feedback and final work to be assessed.

When you use the ideas, words or data of others in your assessment, you must thoroughly and clearly acknowledge the source of this information by using the correct referencing style for your unit. Using others’ work without proper acknowledgement may be considered a form of intellectual dishonesty.

Participating honestly, respectfully, responsibly, and fairly in your university study ensures the CQUniversity qualification you earn will be valued as a true indication of your individual academic achievement and will continue to receive the respect and recognition it deserves.

As a student, you are responsible for reading and following CQUniversity’s policies, including the Student Academic Integrity Policy and Procedure. This policy sets out CQUniversity’s expectations of you to act with integrity, examples of academic integrity breaches to avoid, the processes used to address alleged breaches of academic integrity, and potential penalties.

What is a breach of academic integrity?

A breach of academic integrity includes but is not limited to plagiarism, self-plagiarism, collusion, cheating, contract cheating, and academic misconduct. The Student Academic Integrity Policy and Procedure defines what these terms mean and gives examples.

Why is academic integrity important?

A breach of academic integrity may result in one or more penalties, including suspension or even expulsion from the University. It can also have negative implications for student visas and future enrolment at CQUniversity or elsewhere. Students who engage in contract cheating also risk being blackmailed by contract cheating services.

Where can I get assistance?

For academic advice and guidance, the Academic Learning Centre (ALC) can support you in becoming confident in completing assessments with integrity and of high standard.

What can you do to act with integrity?