CQUniversity Unit Profile
EDCU11033 Multiliteracies
Multiliteracies
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The information will not be changed unless absolutely necessary and any change will be clearly indicated by an approved correction included in the profile.
General Information

Overview

This unit introduces you to socio-cultural theory as a basis for understanding language acquisition and use and for evaluating pedagogical approaches to literacy learning. You will examine “multiliteracies” through the twin dimensions of multimodality and multiple perspectives. An understanding of discourses and the relationship between texts and contexts in developing authentic learning and literacy experiences for first and second language learners at all stages of the school curriculum and prior to formal schooling is explored in depth. You will build an understanding of oracy as a language resource for a growing number of purposes in an increasing range of situations and value children as communicators with a repertoire of practices for making and constructing meaning including the use of Arts symbol systems and ICTs. You will analyse and plan for the use of teaching and learning practices that promote effective interaction with learners and enhance language use, oracy and creativity through engagement with literature and aesthetic meaning making processes in the early years and formal learning contexts.

Details

Career Level: Undergraduate
Unit Level: Level 1
Credit Points: 6
Student Contribution Band: 7
Fraction of Full-Time Student Load: 0.125

Pre-requisites or Co-requisites

There are no requisites for this unit.

Important note: Students enrolled in a subsequent unit who failed their pre-requisite unit, should drop the subsequent unit before the census date or within 10 working days of Fail grade notification. Students who do not drop the unit in this timeframe cannot later drop the unit without academic and financial liability. See details in the Assessment Policy and Procedure (Higher Education Coursework).

Offerings For Term 3 - 2022

Online

Attendance Requirements

All on-campus students are expected to attend scheduled classes – in some units, these classes are identified as a mandatory (pass/fail) component and attendance is compulsory. International students, on a student visa, must maintain a full time study load and meet both attendance and academic progress requirements in each study period (satisfactory attendance for International students is defined as maintaining at least an 80% attendance record).

Class and Assessment Overview

Recommended Student Time Commitment

Each 6-credit Undergraduate unit at CQUniversity requires an overall time commitment of an average of 12.5 hours of study per week, making a total of 150 hours for the unit.

Class Timetable

Bundaberg, Cairns, Emerald, Gladstone, Mackay, Rockhampton, Townsville
Adelaide, Brisbane, Melbourne, Perth, Sydney

Assessment Overview

1. Written Assessment
Weighting: 50%
2. Practical and Written Assessment
Weighting: 50%

Assessment Grading

This is a graded unit: your overall grade will be calculated from the marks or grades for each assessment task, based on the relative weightings shown in the table above. You must obtain an overall mark for the unit of at least 50%, or an overall grade of ‘pass’ in order to pass the unit. If any ‘pass/fail’ tasks are shown in the table above they must also be completed successfully (‘pass’ grade). You must also meet any minimum mark requirements specified for a particular assessment task, as detailed in the ‘assessment task’ section (note that in some instances, the minimum mark for a task may be greater than 50%). Consult the University’s Grades and Results Policy for more details of interim results and final grades.

Previous Student Feedback

Feedback, Recommendations and Responses

Every unit is reviewed for enhancement each year. At the most recent review, the following staff and student feedback items were identified and recommendations were made.

Feedback from students and lecturers

Feedback

Some repetition of subject matter before assessment 1.

Recommendation

Adapt and update some of the initial unit materials.

Feedback from students

Feedback

Second assessment is practical.

Recommendation

Retain the assessment task as it is.

Unit Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this unit, you will be able to:
  1. Explain socio-cultural theories of literacy, language learning and meaning making
  2. Evaluate the diverse communicative backgrounds of children and the impact this diversity has on learning
  3. Explain the effect of oral language development on the literacy learning of young children and/ or learners from diverse linguistic, social and cultural backgrounds
  4. Describe strategies used by educators to develop oracy and build on the home, community and real-world literacy practices of children and school-age learners
  5. Plan developmentally appropriate evidence-informed language and literacy learning activities that are responsive to students from diverse backgrounds
  6. Evaluate activities and teaching strategies from multiple expressive and interpretive modes on their suitability for supporting language and literacy development, imagination, creativity and knowledge of the world for a wide range of learners

Successful completion of this unit provides opportunities for students to engage with the Australian Professional Standards for Teachers (Graduate Career Stage) focus areas of:

1.1 Physical, social and intellectual development and characteristics of students

1.2 Understand how students learn

1.3 Students with diverse linguistic, cultural, religious and socioeconomic backgrounds

1.5 Differentiate teaching to meet the specific learning needs of students across the full range of abilities

2.5 Literacy and numeracy strategies

3.3 Use teaching strategies

3.4 Select and use resources

4.1 Support student participation

In addition, competency elements from the Diploma of Children’s Services (Early Childhood Education and Care) are taught and assessed in this unit.

Alignment of Learning Outcomes, Assessment and Graduate Attributes
N/A Level
Introductory Level
Intermediate Level
Graduate Level
Professional Level
Advanced Level

Alignment of Assessment Tasks to Learning Outcomes

Assessment Tasks Learning Outcomes
1 2 3 4 5 6
1 - Written Assessment - 50%
2 - Practical and Written Assessment - 50%

Alignment of Graduate Attributes to Learning Outcomes

Graduate Attributes Learning Outcomes
1 2 3 4 5 6
1 - Communication
2 - Problem Solving
3 - Critical Thinking
4 - Information Literacy
5 - Team Work
6 - Information Technology Competence
7 - Cross Cultural Competence
8 - Ethical practice
9 - Social Innovation
10 - Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Cultures

Alignment of Assessment Tasks to Graduate Attributes

Assessment Tasks Graduate Attributes
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
1 - Written Assessment - 50%
2 - Practical and Written Assessment - 50%
Textbooks and Resources

Textbooks

Prescribed

Language, Literacy and Early Childhood Education

Edition: Third (2020)
Authors: Fellowes, J. and Oakley, G.
Oxford
Melbourne Melbourne , Victoria , Australia
ISBN: 9780190318567
Binding: Paperback

IT Resources

You will need access to the following IT resources:
  • CQUniversity Student Email
  • Internet
  • Unit Website (Moodle)
Referencing Style

All submissions for this unit must use the referencing style: American Psychological Association 7th Edition (APA 7th edition)

For further information, see the Assessment Tasks.

Teaching Contacts
Dawn Haynes Unit Coordinator
d.haynes@cqu.edu.au
Schedule
Week 1 Begin Date: 07 Nov 2022

Module/Topic

Theories of literacy and their relationship to practice.

Chapter

  • Textbook Chapter 1 - Definitions and Theoretical Perspectives.
  • Chapter 1: Literacy in the Modern World (Winch, G., Johnston, R., March, P., Ljungdahl, L. & Holliday, M. (2020). Literacy: Reading Writing & Children's Literature 6th Edition. Melbourne: Oxford University Press.

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 2 Begin Date: 14 Nov 2022

Module/Topic

Literacy as a socio-cultural practice.

Chapter

      • Barratt-Pugh, C., (2000). The socio-cultural context of literacy learning. In Barratt-Pugh, C., & Rohl, M., (EDS.). Literacy learning in the early years. (pp. 1-26). Crows Nest, NSW: Allen & Unwin.
      • Gee, J. P. (1991). Discourses and literacies. In Social linguistics and literacies: Ideologies in discourses. (2nd ed., pp. 122-148). London: Falmer Press.
      • Jones Diaz, C. (2007). Literacy as social practice. In L. Makin, C. Jones Diaz & C. McLachlin (EDs.). Literacies in childhoood, changing views, changing practice. (2nd ed., pp. 31-40). Marrickville, NSW: Elsevier.

      Events and Submissions/Topic

      Week 3 Begin Date: 21 Nov 2022

      Module/Topic

      New literacy practices and implications for teaching literacy.

      Chapter

      • Carrington, V. (2001). Emergent home literacies: A challenge for educators. Australian Journal of Language and Literacy, 24(2), 88-100.
      • Martello, J. (2007). Many roads through many modes: becoming literate in childhood. In L. Makin, C. Jones Diaz & C. McLachlin (EDs.). Literacies in childhood, changing views, changing practice. (2nd ed., pp. 89-103). Marrickville, NSW: Elsevier.

      Events and Submissions/Topic

      Week 4 Begin Date: 28 Nov 2022

      Module/Topic

      Language acquisition.

      Chapter

      • Textbook Chapter 4 - Oral Language: Perspectives and phases.
      • Textbook Chapter 5 - Early childhood settings and oral language learning and development.

      • Textbook Chapter 6 - Key Early Childhood Learning Contexts for Oral Language.

      • Flint, S., Kitson, L., Lowe, K., Shaw, K., Feez, S., Humphrey, S. & Vicars, M. (2017). Literacy in Australia: Pedagogies for Engagement (2nd ed., pp 72-85). John Wiley & Sons, Australia.

      • Winch, G. & Holliday, M. (2020). Oral Language. In G. Winch, R. Johnston & P. March (Eds.), Literacy: Reading, Writing and Children's Literature (6th ed., Chapter 2). Oxford University Press Australia and New Zealand.

      • Konza, D. (2011). Oral Language. Research into Practice: Literacy is everyone's business, Series 1.1, 1-6.

      Events and Submissions/Topic

      Week 5 Begin Date: 05 Dec 2022

      Module/Topic

      Children as competent and capable communicators.

      Chapter

      • Textbook Chapter 25 - Connecting with Families

      • Anstey, M. & Bull, G. (2004). The Literacy Labyrinth (2nd Ed.) Pearson Education Australia. [Chapter 2 only]

      • McLachlan, C., Nicholson, T., Fielding-Barnsley, R., Mercer, L. & Ohi, S. (2013). Literacy in Early Childhood and Primary Education: Issues, challenges and solutions. Cambridge University Press. [Chapter 5 only]

      • Louden, W. & Hunter, J. (1999). One Hundred Children: baseline assessment of literacy in the early years of education. Journal of Research in Reading, 22(1), 89-94. 

      • Comber, B. & Hill, S. (2000). Socio-economic disadvantage, literacy and social justice: learning from longitudinal case study research. Australian Educational Researcher, 27(3), 79-97.

      • Case Study - Christianne

      Events and Submissions/Topic



      Week 6 Begin Date: 12 Dec 2022

      Module/Topic

      Diverse Literacy Practices

      Chapter

      • Textbook Chapter 26 - Planning for Language and Literacy
      • Arthur, L., McArdle, F. & Papic, M. (2010). Stars are made of glass: Children as capable and creative communicators - Supporting the early years learning framework. Research in practice series 18(2) pp i-5 & 15-16. Early Childhood Australia.
      • Australian Department of Education and Training (2019, March 6). Belonging, being & becoming: The early years learning framework for Australia.
      • Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority [ACARA]. (n.d.). Literacy learning continuum: Australian curriculum.

      Events and Submissions/Topic

      Assessment Task 1 Due - Wednesday 14 December, 2022


      Individual Written Response Due: Week 5 Wednesday (14 Dec 2022) 11:45 pm AEST
      Break Week + University Christmas Break Begin Date: 19 Dec 2022

      Module/Topic

      Chapter


      Events and Submissions/Topic

      Week 7 Begin Date: 02 Jan 2023

      Module/Topic

      Critical and visual literacies.

      Chapter

      • Textbook Chapter 23 - Critical literacy and visual literacy.

      • Hassett, D. & Curwood, J. (2009). Theories and practices of multimodal education: The instructional dynamics of picture books and primary classrooms. The Reading Teacher, 63(4), 270-282.

      Events and Submissions/Topic

      Week 8 Begin Date: 09 Jan 2023

      Module/Topic

      Multiliteracies and children's meaning-making processes.

      Chapter

      • Textbook Chapter 2 - Children's Literature

      • Textbook Chapter 12 - Vocabulary for reading and writing.

      • Textbook Chapter 21 - Writing experiences and activities.

      Events and Submissions/Topic

      Week 9 Begin Date: 16 Jan 2023

      Module/Topic

      Transitions between home and school.

      Chapter

      • Textbook Chapter 13 - Strategies for teaching reading.

      Events and Submissions/Topic

      Week 10 Begin Date: 23 Jan 2023

      Module/Topic

      Developing literacy in reading and writing.

      Chapter

      • Textbook Chapter 10 - Understanding reading.
      • Textbook Chapter 11 - Phonological awareness, letters, sounds and sight words.

      Events and Submissions/Topic

      Week 11 Begin Date: 30 Jan 2023

      Module/Topic

      Multiliteracies and digital texts.

      Chapter

      • Textbook Chapter 24 - Language, literacy and digital technologies.

      Events and Submissions/Topic

      Week 12 Begin Date: 06 Feb 2023

      Module/Topic

      Unit review - no topic.

      Chapter

      Events and Submissions/Topic

      Assessment Task 2 Due - Wednesday 8 February 2023


      Practical and Written Assessment Due: Week 12 Wednesday (8 Feb 2023) 11:45 pm AEST
      Exam Week Begin Date: 13 Feb 2023

      Module/Topic

      Chapter

      Events and Submissions/Topic

      Assessment Tasks

      1 Written Assessment

      Assessment Title
      Individual Written Response

      Task Description

      Individual Written Response

      You will create an individual written response of 1500 words that discusses the claim made by Martello in the following quote:

      "Teachers' recognition of the multimodal practices available to children through their homes, communities and popular culture enriches and extends the possibilities for literacy teaching" (Martello, 2007).

      Your response must define and explain current perspectives on literacy and link these views to the teaching practices that underpin early language and literacy learning in educational settings.

      Your written response should support Martello’s quote by addressing the discussion points below:

      Outline your knowledge and understanding of the socio-cultural theories related to literacy and language acquisition

      Explain the impact of learners’ primary discourse and diverse backgrounds on literacy practices and dispositions of learning in educational settings

      Identify a range of literacy practices used in real world settings

      Identify examples of strategies and teaching practices used in early language and literacy learning

      In order to prepare you to complete your written response and form your position in response to Martello’s quote, activities that analyse four main readings will be embedded as essential weekly engagement in Moodle.


      Assessment Due Date

      Week 5 Wednesday (14 Dec 2022) 11:45 pm AEST

      Please note the assessment due date is week 6, not week 5.


      Return Date to Students

      Feedback on this assessment will be provided in sufficient time to allow for academic support and advice as necessary to inform students' response to the second assessment task.


      Weighting
      50%

      Assessment Criteria

      • Knowledge and understanding of the socio-cultural theories of literacy and language acquisition. 
      • Understanding of the impact of learners' primary discourse and diverse backgrounds on literacy practices and dispositions for learning.
      • Knowledge of the range of literacy practices used in homes and communities in real-world settings.
      • Strategies and teaching practices that underpin early language and literacy learning in educational settings.
      • Use of academic conventions and practices.


      Referencing Style

      Submission
      Online

      Submission Instructions
      The Individual Written Response task will be uploaded via the Assessment Task 1 link in the Multiliteracies Moodle site.

      Learning Outcomes Assessed
      • Explain socio-cultural theories of literacy, language learning and meaning making
      • Evaluate the diverse communicative backgrounds of children and the impact this diversity has on learning
      • Explain the effect of oral language development on the literacy learning of young children and/ or learners from diverse linguistic, social and cultural backgrounds
      • Describe strategies used by educators to develop oracy and build on the home, community and real-world literacy practices of children and school-age learners


      Graduate Attributes
      • Communication
      • Critical Thinking
      • Information Literacy
      • Information Technology Competence
      • Cross Cultural Competence

      2 Practical and Written Assessment

      Assessment Title
      Practical and Written Assessment

      Task Description

      Practical and Individual Written Response

      This task requires you to select a children’s picture book that would be suitable for either a group of 3-5 year old children or children in an early years classroom (Prep, Year 1, or Year 2).

      Using your chosen picture book, you will identify textual and multimodal features and consider how these contribute to and support the development of meaning making for diverse learners in your target group. You will draw upon your knowledge of text features to infer multiple possible meanings and connections between text and context. You will reflect on your own skills, experience, and knowledge you use to construct meaning of the text before considering how diverse learners make meaning and how factors of home, care and formal educational settings influence their own understandings.

      You are then required to plan developmentally appropriate activities and describe engaging strategies you could use to enhance children’s competence as meaning makers. Consideration of the Early Years Learning Framework or the literacy capabilities of the Australian Curriculum should be apparent in the activities and strategies described.

      Conclude your response with a written statement that evaluates the effectiveness of your planned activities and strategies in terms of suitability for supporting language and literacy development, imagination, creativity, and knowledge of the world for a wide range of learners in educational settings. 

      Engagement with the Moodle site and associated tutorials will be essential as further information to support your response and structural considerations will be embedded in weekly activities.


      Assessment Due Date

      Week 12 Wednesday (8 Feb 2023) 11:45 pm AEST


      Return Date to Students

      Feedback on this assessment response will be provided in accordance with university policy prior to certification of grades.


      Weighting
      50%

      Assessment Criteria

      • Knowledge of the textual features of contemporary multimodal texts. 
      • Ability to identify connections between text, context, the multiple possible meanings of text. 
      • Understanding of the range of ways in which young children express and interpret meaning using language, other symbol systems and the influencing factors of home, care and formal educational settings. 
      • Plan and describe developmentally appropriate activities and teaching strategies that promote oracy and the development of literacy practices for learners from diverse backgrounds. 
      • Evaluate activities and teaching strategies from multiple expressive and interpretive modes on their suitability for supporting language and literacy development, imagination, creativity, and knowledge of the world for a wide range of learners. 
      • Use of academic conventions and practices


      Referencing Style

      Submission
      Online

      Submission Instructions
      Upload your Practical and Written Assessment via the Assessment Task 2 link in the Multiliteracies Moodle site (See Assessment Block).

      Learning Outcomes Assessed
      • Explain socio-cultural theories of literacy, language learning and meaning making
      • Explain the effect of oral language development on the literacy learning of young children and/ or learners from diverse linguistic, social and cultural backgrounds
      • Describe strategies used by educators to develop oracy and build on the home, community and real-world literacy practices of children and school-age learners
      • Plan developmentally appropriate evidence-informed language and literacy learning activities that are responsive to students from diverse backgrounds
      • Evaluate activities and teaching strategies from multiple expressive and interpretive modes on their suitability for supporting language and literacy development, imagination, creativity and knowledge of the world for a wide range of learners


      Graduate Attributes
      • Communication
      • Critical Thinking
      • Information Literacy
      • Information Technology Competence
      • Cross Cultural Competence

      Academic Integrity Statement

      As a CQUniversity student you are expected to act honestly in all aspects of your academic work.

      Any assessable work undertaken or submitted for review or assessment must be your own work. Assessable work is any type of work you do to meet the assessment requirements in the unit, including draft work submitted for review and feedback and final work to be assessed.

      When you use the ideas, words or data of others in your assessment, you must thoroughly and clearly acknowledge the source of this information by using the correct referencing style for your unit. Using others’ work without proper acknowledgement may be considered a form of intellectual dishonesty.

      Participating honestly, respectfully, responsibly, and fairly in your university study ensures the CQUniversity qualification you earn will be valued as a true indication of your individual academic achievement and will continue to receive the respect and recognition it deserves.

      As a student, you are responsible for reading and following CQUniversity’s policies, including the Student Academic Integrity Policy and Procedure. This policy sets out CQUniversity’s expectations of you to act with integrity, examples of academic integrity breaches to avoid, the processes used to address alleged breaches of academic integrity, and potential penalties.

      What is a breach of academic integrity?

      A breach of academic integrity includes but is not limited to plagiarism, self-plagiarism, collusion, cheating, contract cheating, and academic misconduct. The Student Academic Integrity Policy and Procedure defines what these terms mean and gives examples.

      Why is academic integrity important?

      A breach of academic integrity may result in one or more penalties, including suspension or even expulsion from the University. It can also have negative implications for student visas and future enrolment at CQUniversity or elsewhere. Students who engage in contract cheating also risk being blackmailed by contract cheating services.

      Where can I get assistance?

      For academic advice and guidance, the Academic Learning Centre (ALC) can support you in becoming confident in completing assessments with integrity and of high standard.

      What can you do to act with integrity?