CQUniversity Unit Profile
EDEC11027 Early Childhood Pedagogies
Early Childhood Pedagogies
All details in this unit profile for EDEC11027 have been officially approved by CQUniversity and represent a learning partnership between the University and you (our student).
The information will not be changed unless absolutely necessary and any change will be clearly indicated by an approved correction included in the profile.
General Information

Overview

In this unit, you will extend your thinking about viable sources of curriculum, and through reflection on the work of educators of Reggio Emilia, you will explore the notion of ‘teacher as researcher’, see yourselves as researchers and see children as active participants in the design, construction and enactment of the ‘curriculum’. You will examine the teacher’s role in pedagogical decisions with particular emphasis on mindfulness, reflective practice and intentional teaching, and as (co)creators of aesthetic learning environments that support connectedness, belonging, investigation, discovery, play and wellbeing. Pedagogies of relationships, place, play, possibility and provocation are examined in in-depth ways. You will examine guiding principles and research underpinning curriculum approaches as well as your own developing assumptions and philosophy of education to articulate what you believe should underpin curriculum inquiry in early childhood. You will inspect how early childhood pedagogy reflects the importance of childhood and contributes to the holistic wellbeing, learning and development of children. As part of this process, you consider what being, belonging and becoming can look like in practice for children and for the early childhood educator. You will scrutinise real-world challenges and dilemmas. You will demonstrate your ability to identify and think through complex issues, diverse interpretations and expectations of the teaching and learning process and respond to these in ways that deepen your intellectual, ethical and emotional engagement work. You will complete a 15 day placement in an early childhood service with children birth to 35 months.

Details

Career Level: Undergraduate
Unit Level: Level 1
Credit Points: 6
Student Contribution Band: 7
Fraction of Full-Time Student Load: 0.125

Pre-requisites or Co-requisites

Pre-requisite EDFE11038 Professional Practice 1 - Introduction to Teaching.

Important note: Students enrolled in a subsequent unit who failed their pre-requisite unit, should drop the subsequent unit before the census date or within 10 working days of Fail grade notification. Students who do not drop the unit in this timeframe cannot later drop the unit without academic and financial liability. See details in the Assessment Policy and Procedure (Higher Education Coursework).

Offerings For Term 3 - 2022

Mixed Mode

Attendance Requirements

All on-campus students are expected to attend scheduled classes – in some units, these classes are identified as a mandatory (pass/fail) component and attendance is compulsory. International students, on a student visa, must maintain a full time study load and meet both attendance and academic progress requirements in each study period (satisfactory attendance for International students is defined as maintaining at least an 80% attendance record).

Class and Assessment Overview

Recommended Student Time Commitment

Each 6-credit Undergraduate unit at CQUniversity requires an overall time commitment of an average of 12.5 hours of study per week, making a total of 150 hours for the unit.

Class Timetable

Bundaberg, Cairns, Emerald, Gladstone, Mackay, Rockhampton, Townsville
Adelaide, Brisbane, Melbourne, Perth, Sydney

Assessment Overview

1. Portfolio
Weighting: 50%
2. Written Assessment
Weighting: 50%
3. Professional Practice Placement
Weighting: Pass/Fail

Assessment Grading

This is a graded unit: your overall grade will be calculated from the marks or grades for each assessment task, based on the relative weightings shown in the table above. You must obtain an overall mark for the unit of at least 50%, or an overall grade of ‘pass’ in order to pass the unit. If any ‘pass/fail’ tasks are shown in the table above they must also be completed successfully (‘pass’ grade). You must also meet any minimum mark requirements specified for a particular assessment task, as detailed in the ‘assessment task’ section (note that in some instances, the minimum mark for a task may be greater than 50%). Consult the University’s Grades and Results Policy for more details of interim results and final grades.

Previous Student Feedback

Feedback, Recommendations and Responses

Every unit is reviewed for enhancement each year. At the most recent review, the following staff and student feedback items were identified and recommendations were made.

Feedback from Unit Evaluations

Feedback

Timely feedback of assessment tasks.

Recommendation

Ensure clear timelines are communicated to markers

Unit Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this unit, you will be able to:
  1. Articulate a theorised approach to early childhood pedagogy that recognises the importance of play and builds on relationships with children and connectedness to their worlds
  2. Evaluate the influence of educators' personal assumptions and biases on understanding and interpreting the contexts and consequences of communities and children's socio-economic backgrounds
  3. Conduct an inquiry into pedagogies of place and play to identify the influence and significance of contexts on teachers' curriculum decision making
  4. Defend the role of the early childhood professional in making ethical decisions that respect children
  5. Critically reflect on prevailing notions of curriculum, curriculum frameworks and schooling to identify opportunities for exercising professional judgement in curriculum decision making and pedagogical practices that value children and childhood in and beyond early years settings.
  6. Complete a placement with young children birth to 35 months
  7. Plan and implement learning experiences that promote the engagement and participation of all learners and are responsive to their characteristics, stage of development and social, cultural and linguistic backgrounds and also link to your observations of the child/children.

Successful completion of this unit provides opportunities for students to engage with the Australian Professional Standards for Teachers (Graduate Career Stage) focus areas of:

1.2 Understand how students learn

2.1 Content and teaching strategies of the teaching area

2.2 Content selection and organization

3.6 Evaluate and improve teaching programs

3.7 Engage parents/carers in the educative process

4.1 Support student participation

6.2 Engage in professional learning and improve practice

7.1 Meet professional ethics and responsibilities

7.2 Comply with legislative, administrative and organisational requirements

Guidelines for the registration of an early childhood qualification with the Australian Children Education and Care Quality Authority (ACECQA) specify what the curriculum of an early childhood course must include. This unit contributes unit content related to early childhood pedagogies and education and curriculum studies.

Alignment of Learning Outcomes, Assessment and Graduate Attributes
N/A Level
Introductory Level
Intermediate Level
Graduate Level
Professional Level
Advanced Level

Alignment of Assessment Tasks to Learning Outcomes

Assessment Tasks Learning Outcomes
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
1 - Portfolio - 50%
2 - Written Assessment - 50%
3 - Professional Practice Placement - 0%

Alignment of Graduate Attributes to Learning Outcomes

Graduate Attributes Learning Outcomes
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
1 - Communication
2 - Problem Solving
3 - Critical Thinking
4 - Information Literacy
5 - Team Work
6 - Information Technology Competence
7 - Cross Cultural Competence
8 - Ethical practice
9 - Social Innovation
10 - Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Cultures

Alignment of Assessment Tasks to Graduate Attributes

Assessment Tasks Graduate Attributes
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
1 - Portfolio - 50%
2 - Written Assessment - 50%
3 - Professional Practice Placement - 0%
Textbooks and Resources

Textbooks

There are no required textbooks.

IT Resources

You will need access to the following IT resources:
  • CQUniversity Student Email
  • Internet
  • Unit Website (Moodle)
Referencing Style

All submissions for this unit must use the referencing style: American Psychological Association 7th Edition (APA 7th edition)

For further information, see the Assessment Tasks.

Teaching Contacts
Kathryn Byrne Unit Coordinator
k.byrne2@cqu.edu.au
Lyn Hughes Unit Coordinator
l.hughes@cqu.edu.au
Schedule
Week 1 Session 2 Child development from birth – 8 years – including understandings outlined in the First 1000 Days Begin Date: 07 Nov 2022

Module/Topic

Child development from birth – 8 years – including understandings outlined in the First 1000 Days

What is our image of children 0- years, 4-8 years and childhood?

How do children grow and learn 3-8 years?

What is pedagogy and curriculum for children 3-8years years?

What are the most important aspects of learning for children in these different age groups?

Chapter

Allen, S. & Whalley, M. (2010), Supporting Pedagogy and Practice in Early Years Settings. Exiter, UK:Learning Matters Ltd, Chapter 2.

Bishop, R., Ladwig, J., & Berryman, M. (2014). The centrality of relationships for pedagogy: The Whanaungatanga thesis. American Educational Research Journal, 51(1), 181-214.

Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University (2016). From Best Practices to Breakthrough Impacts: A Science-Based Approach to Building a More Promising Future for Young Children and Families. Retrieved from: www.developingchild.harvard.edu.

Fleet, A., & Farrell, L. (2014). The Place of Infants in the Evolving Australian Policy Context. Australasian Journal of Early Childhood, 39(4), 81–88.

Moore, T., Dr, Arefadib, N., Deery, A., Dr, & West, S. (2017). The first 1000 days. Centre for Community Child Health.

Pascoe, S., & Brennan, D. (2017). Lifting our game. Queensland Government, Department of Education of Victoria.

Pound, L. (2011), Influencing Early Childhood Education: Key figures, philosophies and ideas, Berkshire, England, Open University Press.

Sommer, D., Samuelsson, I. P., & Hundeide, K. (2013). Early childhood care and education - A child perspective paradigm. European Early Childhood Education Research Journal, 21(4), 459-475.

Walsh, G., McMillan, D. & McGuinness. C. (eds). (2017). Playful teaching and learning. Melbourne: Sage. Chapter 2

It is expected that personal research is used to support your learning.

Events and Submissions/Topic

All references listed for each weekly module may assist you in your assignments.

Please refer to Moodle e Reading Lists as well.

Week 1 Session 1 Valuing childhood and understanding how young children learn Begin Date: 07 Nov 2022

Module/Topic

Valuing Childhood from birth to 8 years.

Why is this time so important?

What does the research say?

How do children grow and learn 0-3 years?

What is pedagogy and curriculum for children 0-3 years?

What is the role of Early childhood services and educators in providing

for the children throughout this time?

Evaluate the influence of educators' personal assumptions and biases on understanding and interpreting the contexts and consequences of communities and children's socio-economic backgrounds

Chapter

Suggested Reading:

Center on the Developing Child. (2015). Supportive relationships and active skill-building strengthen the foundations of resilience. Working Paper 13. Harvard University: Center on the Developing Child.

Sommer, D., Samuelsson, I. P., & Hundeide, K. (2013). Early childhood care and education - A child perspective paradigm. European Early Childhood Education Research Journal, 21(4), 459-475.

Allen, S. & Whalley, M. (2010), Supporting Pedagogy and Practice in Early Years Settings. Exiter, UK: Learning Matters Ltd, Chapter 2. Textbook:

Justus Sluss, D. (2019). Supporting Play in Early Childhood: Environment, Curriculum, Assessment. (3rd ed) Boston, MA, USA: Cengage

Pound, L. (2011), Influencing Early Childhood Education: Key figures, philosophies and ideas, Berkshire, England, Open University Press.

Walsh, G., McMillan, D. & McGuinness. C. (eds). (2017). Playful teaching and learning. Melbourne: Sage. Chapter 2

It is expected that personal research is used to support your learning.

Events and Submissions/Topic

All references listed for each weekly module may assist you in your assignments.

Please refer to Moodle e Reading Lists as well.

Week 2 Session 1 Children's playful inquiry Begin Date: 14 Nov 2022

Module/Topic

Children's Playful Inquiry.

What is Play? Play, learning and brain science in the baby and toddler rooms and beyond.

Is play important for learning during all stages of development of children 0-8 years?

How can play and other reciprocal interactions with adults and other children influence language learning in young children?

Is play important for learning during all stages of development of children 0-8?

Is this different as children get older and does this impact on their development?

What does being playful mean and how does it look for babies 0-2?

What does play-based learning look like for children 3-8? Is this different as children get older and does this impact on their development?

Chapter

Suggested Reading

Basler Wisneski, D. & Reifel, S. (2013), A Place of Play in Early Childhood Curriculum. In N. File, J. Mueller, & D. Basler Wisneski, (Eds.), Curriculum in early childhood education: Re-examined, rediscovered, renewed. (pp. 175-187). NY, NY: Routledge.

Campbell, F., Ramey, C., Pungello, E., Sparling, J., & Miller-Johnson, M. (2002). Early childhood education: Young adult outcomes from the Abecedarian Project. Applied Developmental Science, 6(1), 42-57. 


Dalli, C. (2014). Quality for babies and toddlers in early years settings. Occasional Paper 4. TACTYC, Association for the Professional Development of Early Years Educators.

McMonagle, A. (2012), Professional Pedagogy Project: Supporting every child's right to early education, Ireland, Donegal County Childcare Committee (DCCC3 Publishing).

Lester, S. & Russell, W. (2010). Children's Right to Play: An examination of the importance of play in the lives of children worldwide. Retrieved from Bernard van Leer Foundation

website:http://www.bernardvanleer.org/Childrens-right-to-play-An-examination.

Quiñones, G., Li, L., & Ridgway, A. (2021). Affective Early Childhood Pedagogy for Infant-Toddlers.

It is expected that personal research is used to support your learning.

Events and Submissions/Topic

All references listed for each weekly module may assist you in your assignments.

Please refer to Moodle e Reading Lists as well.

Week 2 Session 2 Where does Curriculum and Pedagogy fit into Early Childhood? Begin Date: 14 Nov 2022

Module/Topic

Where does Curriculum and Pedagogy fit into Early Childhood?

Articulate a theorised approach to early childhood pedagogy that recognises the importance of play and builds on relationships with children and connectedness to their worlds.

Conduct an inquiry into pedagogies of place and play to identify the influence and significance of contexts on teachers' curriculum decision making.

Critically reflect on prevailing notions of curriculum, curriculum frameworks and schooling to identify opportunities for exercising professional judgement in curriculum decision making and pedagogical practices that value children and childhood in and beyond early years settings.

Discussing and exploring the different policies and planning principles for children birth to 6 years.

Exploring the different early childhood settings that the age groups are attending.

What are the strategies that fall with in the principles of early learnig.

Chapter

Australian Government Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations. (2009). Belonging, being and becoming: The early years learning framework for Australia. Canberra: Author.

Fleer, M. (2015). Pedagogical positioning in play–teachers being inside and outside of children's imaginary play. Early child development and care, 185(11-12), 1801-1814.

Forbes, R. (2004). Beginning to play: Young children from birth to three. Open University Press.

Hughes, A. M. (2010). Developing play for the under 3s: The treasure basket and heuristic play. London: Routledge.

Events and Submissions/Topic

All references listed for each weekly module may assist you in your assignments.

Please refer to Moodle e Reading Lists as well.

Week 3 Session 1 Global perspectives of early childhood pedagogy and curriculum. Begin Date: 21 Nov 2022

Module/Topic

Global perspectives on early childhood pedagogy and curriculum.

What is the importance of curriculum frameworks when teaching children birth to 3?

How can a global perspective guide our pedagogy and world view of play?

What does international research teach us about children's learning?

How best do children learn?

Does this type of understanding help us to consider the multicultural influences in our teaching and learning?

Chapter

Suggested Reading:

Department of Education, Employment and Workplace (DEEWR,(2010), Educators Being, Belonging, Becoming: Educators' Guide to the Early Years Learning Framework

Edwards, S., Mantilla, A., Grieshaber, S., Nuttall, J., & Wood, E. (2020). Converged play characteristics for early childhood education: multi-modal, global-local, and traditional-digital. Oxford Review of Education, 1-24.

Fleer, M. (2021). Play in the early years. Cambridge University Press.

Steiner Education, (2011).Australian Steiner Curriculum Framework, 2011, Kindergarten/Foundation Position Paper.

Forest School Canada, (2014). Forest and Nature School in Canada: A Head, Hands Approach to Outdoor Learning.

It is expected that personal research is used to support your learning.

Events and Submissions/Topic

All references listed for each weekly module may assist you in your assignments.

Please refer to Moodle e Reading Lists as well.

Week 3 Session 2 What about contemporary children, play, and technology? Begin Date: 21 Nov 2022

Module/Topic

What about contemporary children, play, and technology?

Chapter

Theobald, M., Danby, S., Davidson, C., Houen, S., Scriven, B., & Thorpe, K. (2016). How talk and interaction unfold in a digitally enabled preschool classroom. Australian Journal of Linguistics, 36(2), 189-204.

Davidson, C., Danby, S. J., Given, L. M., & Thorpe, K. J. (2016). Facilitating young children’s use of the web in preschool. Journal of Research in Childhood Education, 30(4), 569-584.

Danby, S. J., Fleer, M., Davidson, C., & Hatzigianni, M. (Eds.). (2018). Digital Childhoods: Technologies and Children’s Everyday Lives (Vol. 22). Springer.

Scriven, B., Edwards-Groves, C., & Davidson, C. (2018). A Young Child’s Use of Multiple Technologies in the Social Organisation of a Pretend Telephone Conversation. In Digital Childhoods (pp. 267-284). Springer, Singapore.



Events and Submissions/Topic

All references listed for each weekly module may assist you in your assignments.

Please refer to Moodle e Reading Lists as well.

Week 4 Session 2 Contemporary studies on Appropriate Pedagogies for children birth to 8 years (e.g., The effective provision of pre-school education), Begin Date: 28 Nov 2022

Module/Topic

Contemporary studies on Appropriate Pedagogies for children birth to 8 years (e.g., The effective provision of pre-school education),

Plan and implement learning experiences that promote the engagement and participation of all learners and are responsive to their characteristics, stage of development and social, cultural and linguistic backgrounds and also link to your observations of the child/children.

Appropriate pedagogies in the early years of schooling

Chapter

Bassok D., Latham, S. & Rorem A. (2015). Is kindergarten the new first grade? EdPolicyWorks Working Paper Series, No. 20.

Edwards, S. (2017). Play-based learning and intentional teaching: Forever different?, Australasian Journal of Early Childhood,42(2), 4-11.https://doi.org/10.23965/AJEC.42.2.01

Hall, J., Sylva, K., Melhuish, E., Sammons, P., Siraj-Blatchford, I., & Taggart, B. (2009). The role of preschool quality in promoting resilience in the cognitive development of young children. Oxford Review of Education, 35(3), 331-352.

Irvine, S. (2016). Playful pedagogies: Promoting active learning through play and imagination in the early years of school. In D. Bland. (Ed.), Imagination for Inclusion: Diverse Contexts of Educational Practice. (pp. 18-30). Abingdon, Oxon: Taylor and Francis.

Mardell, B., Wilson, D., Ryan, J, Ertel, K., Krechevsky, M & Baker, M. (2016). Towards a pedagogy of play. Retrieved February 7, 2018 from Project Zero: http:// pz.harvard.edu/resources/towards-a-pedagogy-of-play

Milne, I. (2010).A sense of wonder, arising from aesthetic experiences, should be the starting point for inquiry in primary science. Science Education International, 21(2), 102-115.

Queensland Department of Education and Training (2015). Age-appropriate pedagogies for the early years of schooling: Foundation paper. Brisbane, Australia: Queensland Government.


Sonter, Lisa. Risky business: Viewing intentional teaching as a risky endeavour [online]. Educating Young Children: Learning and Teaching in the Early Childhood Years, Vol. 19, No. 2, 2013: 42-43. 

Somerville, M., Davies, B., Power, K., Gannon, S. & de Carteret, P. (2011). Place pedagogy change. Netherlands: Sense Publishing.

Walsh, G., McMillan, D. & McGuinness.C. (eds). (2017). Playful teaching and learning. Melbourne: Sage. Chapter 2

Weisberg, D., Hirsh-Pasek, K., & Golinkoff, R. (2013). Guided Play: Where curriculur goals meet a playful pedagogy. Mind, Brain and Education 7(2), 104-112



Events and Submissions/Topic

All references listed for each weekly module may assist you in your assignments.

Please refer to Moodle e Reading Lists as well.

Week 4 Session 1 Complexities and challenges in early childhood. Begin Date: 28 Nov 2022

Module/Topic

Complexities and challenges in early childhood.


Chapter

Suggested Reading:

Scotland's Commissioner for Children and Young People, (2014), Children's Right to Play, Culture and Arts.

Almon, J. & Miller, E. (2011). The Crisis in Early Childhood. Retrieved from the Alliance for Childhood website:

http://www.allianceforchildren.org/sites/allianceforchildhood.org/files/files/crisis-in-early-ed.pdf

Sims. M. (2014). Is the Care-Education Dichotomy Behind Us? Should it Be? Australasia Journal of Early Childhood, Vol. 39, No. 4.

It is expected that personal research is used to support your learning.

Events and Submissions/Topic

All references listed for each weekly module may assist you in your assignments.

Please refer to Moodle e Reading Lists as well.

Week 5 Session 1 The environment as the third teacher: DUE TO THE INTENSIVE NATURE OF THIS UNIT WE WILL NOT BE OBSERVING THIS BREAK WEEK. - Begin Date: 05 Dec 2022

Module/Topic

This week is a non-teaching week but we will be continuing with our studies during this week due to the intensive nature of the unit. This will be week 5

for us.

Chapter

Suggested Reading

Archer, C. & Siraj, I. (2015). Measuring the quality of movement-play in early Childhood education settings: Linking movement-play and neuroscience. European Early Childhood Research Journal, 23(1), 21-42.

Berris, R. & Miller, E. (2011). How design of the physical environment impacts early learning: Educators' and parents' perspectives. Australasian Journal of Early Childhood, 36(4). 102-110.

Events and Submissions/Topic

All references listed for each weekly module may assist you in your assignments.

Please refer to Moodle e Reading Lists as well.

Week 5 Session 2 Play as a context for emergent literacy and numeracy Begin Date: 05 Dec 2022

Module/Topic

How and when do we begin teaching young children to be literate and numerate?

Chapter

Element, Mathilda; Webster, Sue; Lee, Melissa and Ruskin, Carol. Reflective practice [online]. Educating Young Children: Learning and Teaching in the Early Childhood Years, Vol. 18, No. 1, 2012: 13-17.

Alexander, R. (2012). Improving oracy and classroom talk in English schools: Achievements and challenges. Extended and referenced version of a presentation given at the DfE seminar on Oracy, the National Curriculum and Educational Standards, February 20, London.

Alexander, R.J. (2015). Teaching and learning for all? The quality imperative revisited. International Journal of Educational Development, 40, 250-258.

Ang, L. (2014). Preschool or prep school? Rethinking the role of early years education. Contemporary Issues in Early Childhood, 15(2), 185-199.

Events and Submissions/Topic

All references listed for each weekly module may assist you in your assignments.

Please refer to Moodle e Reading Lists as well.

Week 6 Session 2 Professional pedagogy in early childhood Begin Date: 12 Dec 2022

Module/Topic

Professional pedagogy in early childhood.

What is the future of early childhood?

How can we 'future proof' the pedagogy of play at all developmental stages?

What will learning and teaching in the EC sector look like in the future?

Chapter

Suggested Reading:

Barnes, S. (2012). Making Sense of Intentional Teaching: Children's Services Central. retrieved from:

http://www.cscentral.org.au/Resources/intentional-teaching-web.pdf.

Leggett, N. & Ford, M. (2013). A Fine Balance: Understanding the roles of educators and children's play as intentional teachers and intentional learners within the Early Years Learning Framework. Australasia Journal of Early Childhood, Vol. 38, No. 4.

Community Child Care Victoria, (2011). Collaborating withChildren for Effective Programming: Self-guided learning package.

It is expected that personal research is used to support your learning.

Events and Submissions/Topic

All references listed for each weekly module may assist you in your assignments.

Please refer to Moodle e Reading Lists as well.

Week 6 Session 1 Building partnerships to advocate and support playful learning Begin Date: 12 Dec 2022

Module/Topic

Building partnerships to advocate and support playful learning

Defend the role of the early childhood professional in making ethical decisions that respect children

Chapter

Fenech, M. (2013). Quality early childhood education for my child or for all children? : parents as activists for equitable, high-quality early childhood education in Australia. Australasian Journal of Early Childhood, 38(4), 92–98.

Fenech, M., Salamon, A., & Stratigos, T. (2019). Building parents’ understandings of quality early childhood education and care and early learning and development: changing constructions to change conversations. European Early Childhood Education Research Journal, 27(5), 706–721.

Events and Submissions/Topic

All references listed for each weekly module may assist you in your assignments.

Please refer to Moodle e Reading Lists as well.

Assessment task 1 Due Begin Date: 19 Dec 2022

Module/Topic

Assessment task 1 Due

Chapter

Events and Submissions/Topic

Portfolio - A Research Inquiry of Place and Play Due: Vacation Week Monday (19 Dec 2022) 12:00 pm AEST



Portfolio - A Research Inquiry of Place and Play Due: Week 6 Monday (19 Dec 2022) 12:00 am AEST
Week 10 Session 1 Ethical decision making considering what we know from Reseach Begin Date: 23 Jan 2023

Module/Topic

Ethical decision making considering what we know from Reseach

Chapter

Early Childhood Australia. (2016). Code of Ethics.

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 11 Assessment task 2 Due Begin Date: 30 Jan 2023

Module/Topic

Assessment task 2 Due

Chapter

Events and Submissions/Topic

Reflection on a contemporary issue using play based pedagogical learning Due: Week 11

Monday(30 Jan, 2023) 11:45 pm AEST


Reflection on a contemporary issue using play based pedagogical learning Due: Week 11 Monday (30 Jan 2023) 11:45 pm AEST
Term Specific Information

Overview

In this unit, you will extend your thinking about viable sources of curriculum, and through reflection on the work of educators of Reggio Emilia, you will explore the notion of ‘teacher as researcher’, see yourselves as researchers and see children as active participants in the design, construction, and enactment of the ‘curriculum’. You will examine the teacher’s role in pedagogical decisions with particular emphasis on mindfulness, reflective practice, and intentional teaching, and as (co)creators of aesthetic learning environments that support connectedness, belonging, investigation, discovery, play, and wellbeing. Pedagogies of relationships, place, play, possibility, and provocation are examined in in-depth ways. You will examine guiding principles and research underpinning curriculum approaches as well as your own developing assumptions and philosophy of education to articulate what you believe should underpin curriculum inquiry in early childhood. You will inspect how early childhood pedagogy reflects the importance of childhood and contributes to the holistic well-being, learning, and development of children. As part of this process, you consider what being, belonging, and becoming can look like in practice for children and for the early childhood educator. You will scrutinise real-world challenges and dilemmas. You will demonstrate your ability to identify and think through complex issues, diverse interpretations, and expectations of the teaching and learning process and respond to these in ways that deepen your intellectual, ethical and emotional engagement work. You will complete a 15-day placement in an early childhood service with children birth to 35 months.

Unit coordinator is Lyn Hughes

l.hughes@cqu.edu.au

Assessment Tasks

1 Portfolio

Assessment Title
Portfolio - A Research Inquiry of Place and Play

Task Description

Portfolio - A Research Inquiry of Place and Play

Assessment Type Portfolio

Task Description

In this task, you are required to use the research methodology of visual ethnography. This requires you to study two learning environments (play space). This means that you examine one man-made environment and one natural environment or a combination of the two. In the selection of the learning environments, you need to ensure that one of these environments provides opportunities for children, birth to 35 months to engage in the space. As you select the play spaces, you may also like to consider spaces in which children like to play; well-used places and spaces; poorly used places and spaces; child-friendly space/s; community space/s; beautiful spaces and so on.

You will need to identify a Research Question/s that will direct an inquiry into the use of the learning environment that you have chosen. The focus of your research question/s should consider:

· What understandings about the children are reflected in the design or features of this play space?

· Are there opportunities for children to play and what type of play is encouraged in this space?

· As you examine the space and the possibilities afforded for children, consider also pedagogical implications for teachers. For example, how might the teacher engage with the children in the space and how might the teacher add to the play space over time?

· How do the spaces contribute to ensuring opportunities for optimal brain development?

Documentation of the spaces will be collected using a number of resources. This includes photos/images; drawings and sketches; journal entries; film clips; collections of materials or objects or artifacts or signs/symbols at sites; mapping of pathways in spaces) during field-work.

The documentation will be analysed to identify possible patterns, themes, paradoxes and issues in relation to the research question you have explored. The focus for your analysis also needs to link back to the dot points under the focus for your research question.

The assignment will be presented as a photo essay, a collage of multiple data, a poster display, or a mix of images and

narrative text.

This visual display will be accompanied by an up to 2000 words statement that describes the context of the issue studied; a clear research question/issue explored; the methods used to collect data; interpretations and implications of the data for curriculum and pedagogy in relation to place/play and the way in which possible biases and assumptions and personal experiences influenced the research and your interpretations of the data.

Weight 50%

NOTE: This assessment task builds professional knowledge and understanding of pedagogical practice in early years contexts and develops critical reflection on the role of ongoing professional learning in enacting professional roles in diverse early learning settings. The task can be used as evidence for demonstrating aspects of the Australian

Professional Standards for Teachers focus areas 1.2, 2.1, 2.2, 4.1 and 6.2.

Assessment Due Date

Friday (19 Dec, 2022) 11:45 pm AEST



Assessment Due Date

Week 6 Monday (19 Dec 2022) 12:00 am AEST


Return Date to Students

Weighting
50%

Assessment Criteria

Understanding the importance of the First 1000 Days of a child's life and the links to their life trajectories

Knowledge and understanding of early childhood pedagogies and the importance of play in young children’s learning

Application of an inquiry learning framework guided by a clear research question

Documentation of children’s learning and pedagogical processes

Critical reflection on implications for teaching, professional roles, and sources of professional learning for teachers


Referencing Style

Submission
Online

Learning Outcomes Assessed
  • Evaluate the influence of educators' personal assumptions and biases on understanding and interpreting the contexts and consequences of communities and children's socio-economic backgrounds
  • Conduct an inquiry into pedagogies of place and play to identify the influence and significance of contexts on teachers' curriculum decision making


Graduate Attributes
  • Communication
  • Problem Solving
  • Critical Thinking
  • Information Literacy
  • Information Technology Competence
  • Cross Cultural Competence
  • Ethical practice

2 Written Assessment

Assessment Title
Reflection on a contemporary issue using play based pedagogical learning

Task Description

Task Description

Task Description

This task requires you to identify a challenge or issue within the contemporary teaching-learning context. In beginning this task, you need to select a case study or media vignette (suggestions will be provided during tutorials). As you engage with the case study you need to identify the challenges or tensions within this issue. Your analysis will be supported through consideration of the principles, practices, and outcomes articulated in the Early Years Learning Framework (DEEWR, 2009) and the Rights of the Child (UNCRC, 19). Additionally, you need to consider how this challenge or issue links to early childhood pedagogies.

Following analysis of the issues, you will describe methods that you would use to address the issue/dilemma with reference to relationship building between all stakeholders to address the issue/dilemma.

After critically reflecting on the issue and your approach to addressing the issue, you need to articulate the principles that will support your work as an early childhood pedagogue in the future. You must ensure that the principles you articulate and use to guide your practice into the future are inclusive of children birth to eight.

There must be evidence of research using authoritative sources to support your approach to this assessment task.

Word Count: Up to 2000 words.

Weight: 50%

 

NOTE: This assessment task extends the understanding of research-informed practice in early childhood settings. The task includes a focus on the evaluation of teaching programs and strategies for engaging with parents/carers and colleagues to improve teaching practice. 


Assessment Due Date

Week 11 Monday (30 Jan 2023) 11:45 pm AEST


Return Date to Students

Weighting
50%

Assessment Criteria

Identification of a contemporary issue or challenge arising in the early childhood space

Articulation of the links between the principles, practices, and outcomes of Early Years Learning Framework and the Rights of the Child

Critical reflection on the role of early childhood professionals in supporting learning for children from diverse backgrounds through collegial partnerships t

Use of authoritative sources to back claims and provide justification for strategies


Development of a theorised approach to early childhood pedagogies (philosophy)


Referencing Style

Submission
Online

Learning Outcomes Assessed
  • Articulate a theorised approach to early childhood pedagogy that recognises the importance of play and builds on relationships with children and connectedness to their worlds
  • Evaluate the influence of educators' personal assumptions and biases on understanding and interpreting the contexts and consequences of communities and children's socio-economic backgrounds
  • Conduct an inquiry into pedagogies of place and play to identify the influence and significance of contexts on teachers' curriculum decision making
  • Defend the role of the early childhood professional in making ethical decisions that respect children
  • Critically reflect on prevailing notions of curriculum, curriculum frameworks and schooling to identify opportunities for exercising professional judgement in curriculum decision making and pedagogical practices that value children and childhood in and beyond early years settings.


Graduate Attributes
  • Communication
  • Problem Solving
  • Critical Thinking
  • Information Literacy
  • Cross Cultural Competence
  • Ethical practice

3 Professional Practice Placement

Assessment Title
15 Day Professional Practice Placement and Learning Log completed in a Childcare Centre

Task Description

EDEC11029 Professional Practice (Birth – 35 months) 15-Day Placement: Completion of all tasks associated with either the Diploma of Early Childhood Education and Care placement requirement or 15-day child care placement with young children (6 weeks to 35 months). It is a requirement that all students completing a Bachelor of Education Early Childhood studies must complete one placement in a Childcare centre. Pass/Fail Assessment task.


Assessment Due Date

Exam Week Monday (13 Feb 2023) 1:00 pm AEST


Return Date to Students

Weighting
Pass/Fail

Minimum mark or grade
Pass

Assessment Criteria

Complete a professional placement in a childcare setting with a minimum of 15 days working with children birth - 35 months requiring observation, planning, and implementation of learning experiences.


Referencing Style

Submission
Online

Learning Outcomes Assessed
  • Complete a placement with young children birth to 35 months
  • Plan and implement learning experiences that promote the engagement and participation of all learners and are responsive to their characteristics, stage of development and social, cultural and linguistic backgrounds and also link to your observations of the child/children.


Graduate Attributes
  • Communication
  • Problem Solving
  • Team Work
  • Cross Cultural Competence
  • Ethical practice

Academic Integrity Statement

As a CQUniversity student you are expected to act honestly in all aspects of your academic work.

Any assessable work undertaken or submitted for review or assessment must be your own work. Assessable work is any type of work you do to meet the assessment requirements in the unit, including draft work submitted for review and feedback and final work to be assessed.

When you use the ideas, words or data of others in your assessment, you must thoroughly and clearly acknowledge the source of this information by using the correct referencing style for your unit. Using others’ work without proper acknowledgement may be considered a form of intellectual dishonesty.

Participating honestly, respectfully, responsibly, and fairly in your university study ensures the CQUniversity qualification you earn will be valued as a true indication of your individual academic achievement and will continue to receive the respect and recognition it deserves.

As a student, you are responsible for reading and following CQUniversity’s policies, including the Student Academic Integrity Policy and Procedure. This policy sets out CQUniversity’s expectations of you to act with integrity, examples of academic integrity breaches to avoid, the processes used to address alleged breaches of academic integrity, and potential penalties.

What is a breach of academic integrity?

A breach of academic integrity includes but is not limited to plagiarism, self-plagiarism, collusion, cheating, contract cheating, and academic misconduct. The Student Academic Integrity Policy and Procedure defines what these terms mean and gives examples.

Why is academic integrity important?

A breach of academic integrity may result in one or more penalties, including suspension or even expulsion from the University. It can also have negative implications for student visas and future enrolment at CQUniversity or elsewhere. Students who engage in contract cheating also risk being blackmailed by contract cheating services.

Where can I get assistance?

For academic advice and guidance, the Academic Learning Centre (ALC) can support you in becoming confident in completing assessments with integrity and of high standard.

What can you do to act with integrity?