CQUniversity Unit Profile
EDED11455 Curriculum Foundations and Decision-Making
Curriculum Foundations and Decision-Making
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The information will not be changed unless absolutely necessary and any change will be clearly indicated by an approved correction included in the profile.
General Information

Overview

Curriculum Foundations and Decision-making builds students’ knowledge and understanding of the key learning theories of behaviourism, humanism, constructivism, social-constructivism and connectivism as a basis for exploring pedagogical approaches to curriculum construction and decision-making. Analysis and critique of the view of learners and approaches to teaching and learning articulated in the Early Years Learning Framework and Australian Curriculum documents are an important focus of this unit. Students reflect on how learners are positioned to make transitions to new learning contexts and evaluate strategies for designing authentic relevant curriculum and environments for diverse learner groups with a focus on inquiry, active investigation and problem-solving. Students collaborate in groups to apply these strategies across selected learning contexts including early years settings to either: (a) the design and presentation of child-centred open-ended learning experiences; or (b) the creation of a learning environment with possibilities for developing literate, numerate, scientific, technological or environmental understandings

Details

Career Level: Undergraduate
Unit Level: Level 1
Credit Points: 6
Student Contribution Band: 7
Fraction of Full-Time Student Load: 0.125

Pre-requisites or Co-requisites

There are no requisites for this unit.

Important note: Students enrolled in a subsequent unit who failed their pre-requisite unit, should drop the subsequent unit before the census date or within 10 working days of Fail grade notification. Students who do not drop the unit in this timeframe cannot later drop the unit without academic and financial liability. See details in the Assessment Policy and Procedure (Higher Education Coursework).

Offerings For Term 2 - 2019

Bundaberg
Cairns
Gladstone
Mackay
Noosa
Online
Rockhampton
Townsville

Attendance Requirements

All on-campus students are expected to attend scheduled classes – in some units, these classes are identified as a mandatory (pass/fail) component and attendance is compulsory. International students, on a student visa, must maintain a full time study load and meet both attendance and academic progress requirements in each study period (satisfactory attendance for International students is defined as maintaining at least an 80% attendance record).

Class and Assessment Overview

Recommended Student Time Commitment

Each 6-credit Undergraduate unit at CQUniversity requires an overall time commitment of an average of 12.5 hours of study per week, making a total of 150 hours for the unit.

Class Timetable

Bundaberg, Cairns, Emerald, Gladstone, Mackay, Rockhampton, Townsville
Adelaide, Brisbane, Melbourne, Perth, Sydney

Assessment Overview

1. Written Assessment
Weighting: 50%
2. Practical and Written Assessment
Weighting: 50%

Assessment Grading

This is a graded unit: your overall grade will be calculated from the marks or grades for each assessment task, based on the relative weightings shown in the table above. You must obtain an overall mark for the unit of at least 50%, or an overall grade of ‘pass’ in order to pass the unit. If any ‘pass/fail’ tasks are shown in the table above they must also be completed successfully (‘pass’ grade). You must also meet any minimum mark requirements specified for a particular assessment task, as detailed in the ‘assessment task’ section (note that in some instances, the minimum mark for a task may be greater than 50%). Consult the University’s Grades and Results Policy for more details of interim results and final grades.

Previous Student Feedback

Feedback, Recommendations and Responses

Every unit is reviewed for enhancement each year. At the most recent review, the following staff and student feedback items were identified and recommendations were made.

Feedback from Unit evaluation

Feedback

Some students commented about the amount of content in this unit

Recommendation

Some content within the unit needs consolidation and refining in order to keep the scope of the unit in line with the learning outcomes.

Feedback from Unit evaluation

Feedback

Some students wrote that they felt the assessment tasks were complex, time consuming and rushed especially Task 2.

Recommendation

Ensure that every tutor has a clear expectation of the requirements of the assessment task so that they can scaffold towards the timely and successful completion of the task.

Unit Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this unit, you will be able to:
  1. Identify key ideas, contemporary influences and conflicting perspectives on curriculum development and planning
  2. Evaluate the application of key learning theories to the goals and priorities of 21st century learning
  3. Summarise the view of learners, teaching and learning articulated in current national curriculum documents and policies specific to educational and/or early childhood settings
  4. Analyse examples of teaching practice to evaluate the selection of teaching strategies for child-centred learning for students with a diverse range of interests, backgrounds and needs
  5. Design learning opportunities that incorporate a range of resources and strategies to promote language development, curiosity, inquiry, imagination, self-expression, higher-order thinking and problem-solving in a range of settings and learning areas.

Successful completion of this unit provides opportunities for students to engage with the Australian Professional Standards for Teachers (Graduate Career Stage) focus areas of:

1.1 Physical, social and intellectual development and characteristics of students

1.2 Understand how students learn

1.3 Students with diverse linguistic, cultural, religious and socioeconomic backgrounds

2.5 Literacy and numeracy strategies

2.6 Information and Communication Technology (ICT)

3.1 Establish challenging learning goals

3.3 Use teaching strategies

3.4 Select and use resources

6.4 Apply professional learning and improve student learning

In addition, competency elements from the Diploma of Children’s Services (Early Childhood Education and Care) are taught and assessed in this unit.

Alignment of Learning Outcomes, Assessment and Graduate Attributes
N/A Level
Introductory Level
Intermediate Level
Graduate Level
Professional Level
Advanced Level

Alignment of Assessment Tasks to Learning Outcomes

Assessment Tasks Learning Outcomes
1 2 3 4 5
1 - Written Assessment - 50%
2 - Practical and Written Assessment - 50%

Alignment of Graduate Attributes to Learning Outcomes

Graduate Attributes Learning Outcomes
1 2 3 4 5
1 - Communication
2 - Problem Solving
3 - Critical Thinking
4 - Information Literacy
5 - Team Work
6 - Information Technology Competence
7 - Cross Cultural Competence
8 - Ethical practice
9 - Social Innovation

Alignment of Assessment Tasks to Graduate Attributes

Assessment Tasks Graduate Attributes
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
1 - Written Assessment - 50%
2 - Practical and Written Assessment - 50%
Textbooks and Resources

Textbooks

Prescribed

Teaching:Making a difference 4th Edition ()

Authors: Churchill, R. et al
Wiley
Milton Milton , Queensland , Australia
ISBN: 0730363457
Binding: Paperback

Additional Textbook Information


This text was a set text for the Term 1 unit EDED11454 Education as a Profession.

IT Resources

You will need access to the following IT resources:
  • CQUniversity Student Email
  • Internet
  • Unit Website (Moodle)
Referencing Style

All submissions for this unit must use the referencing style: American Psychological Association 6th Edition (APA 6th edition)

For further information, see the Assessment Tasks.

Teaching Contacts
Lyn Hughes Unit Coordinator
l.hughes@cqu.edu.au
Schedule
Week 1 Definitions of "curriculum" Begin Date: 15 Jul 2019

Module/Topic

Definitions of "curriculum"

Chapter


Set Text. Chapter 6 (pages 186-197) Details of weekly readings and activities can be found on Moodle.

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 2 Social contexts and curriculum Begin Date: 22 Jul 2019

Module/Topic

Social contexts and curriculum

Chapter


Details of weekly readings and activities can be found on Moodle. CRO Brady and Kennedy Chapter 10

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 3 Curriculum documents: The Australian Curriculum Begin Date: 29 Jul 2019

Module/Topic

Curriculum documents: The Australian Curriculum

Chapter

CRO Clarke & Pittaway. Chapter 5 The Australian Curriculum Details of weekly readings and activities can be found on Moodle

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 4 Learning theories Begin Date: 05 Aug 2019

Module/Topic

Learning theories

Chapter

Set Text Chapter 3 CRO Groundwater-Smith et al Details of weekly readings and activities can be found on Moodle. 

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 5 Curriculum and enhancing learning: Early Years Learning Framework Begin Date: 12 Aug 2019

Module/Topic

Curriculum and enhancing learning: Early Years Learning Framework

Chapter

Details of weekly readings and activities can be found on Moodle. Early Years Learning Framework

Events and Submissions/Topic

Vacation Week Begin Date: 19 Aug 2019

Module/Topic

No tutorial or Zoom session this week. Use this week to catch up on outstanding activities.

Chapter


Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 6 Motivation and curriculum relevance Begin Date: 26 Aug 2019

Module/Topic

Motivation and curriculum relevance

Chapter

Details of weekly readings and activities can be found on Moodle. CRO Ewing Chapter 5 Set Text Chapter 4


Events and Submissions/Topic

COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS (WRITTEN ASSESSMENT 50%)

Due: Week 6 Friday (30 Aug. 2019) 11:45 pm AEST



COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS (WRITTEN ASSESSMENT 50%) Due: Week 6 Friday (30 Aug 2019) 11:45 pm AEST
Week 7 Social and emotional influences on learning Begin Date: 02 Sep 2019

Module/Topic

Social and emotional influences on learning


Chapter

Details of weekly readings and activities can be found on Moodle. CRO Snowman et al.

Set Text Chapter 9

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 8 Curriculum approaches and pedagogies Begin Date: 09 Sep 2019

Module/Topic

Curriculum approaches and pedagogies

Chapter

Details of weekly readings and activities can be found on Moodle.

CRO Farmer, Dockett, & Arthur.

Chapter 7 Set Text Chapter 6 

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 9 Relationships and interactions in learning Begin Date: 16 Sep 2019

Module/Topic

Relationships and interactions in learning

Chapter

Details of weekly readings and activities can be found on Moodle. CRO Brady CRO Edwards-Groves et al. 

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 10 ICTs and environments for inquiry Begin Date: 23 Sep 2019

Module/Topic

ICTs and environments for inquiry

Chapter


Details of weekly readings and activities can be found on Moodle. CRO Beauchamp

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 11 Review and group presentation Begin Date: 30 Sep 2019

Module/Topic

Review and group presentations

Chapter

Details of weekly readings and activities can be found on Moodle

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 12 Review and group presentation Begin Date: 07 Oct 2019

Module/Topic

Review and group presentations

Chapter

Details of weekly readings and activities can be found on Moodle

Events and Submissions/Topic

Review/Exam Week Begin Date: 14 Oct 2019

Module/Topic

Chapter

Details of weekly readings and activities can be found on Moodle

Events and Submissions/Topic

2: OBSERVATION OF TEACHING PRACTICE AND LEARNING DESIGN (PRACTICAL AND WRITTEN ASSESSMENT 50%)

Due: Review/Exam Week Monday (14 Oct. 2019) 11:45 pm AEST



OBSERVATION OF TEACHING PRACTICE AND LEARNING DESIGN (PRACTICAL AND WRITTEN ASSESSMENT 50% Due: Review/Exam Week Monday (14 Oct 2019) 11:45 am AEST
Exam Week Begin Date: 21 Oct 2019

Module/Topic

Chapter

Events and Submissions/Topic

Assessment Tasks

1 Written Assessment

Assessment Title
COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS (WRITTEN ASSESSMENT 50%)

Task Description

This task requires you to summarise, compare and analyse the audience, organisation, relationship to social context and view of learners, teaching and learning outlined in two current curriculum documents that frame the work of educators in Australian early learning settings and schools. These documents are The Early Years Learning Framework (EYLF) and the Australian Curriculum.

Your response to this task should be no more than 2000 words and should be organised according to the headings in sections 1-5 outlined below. In each section, you will need to examine BOTH the Early Years Learning Framework and the Australian Curriculum and compare them according to their similarities and differences on the key points outlined in the section headings. Your conclusion will evaluate each document in terms of how it is designed to help teachers create meaningful and relevant curriculum for diverse student groups and individuals.

Your response must include references to unit readings and the documents themselves to support your discussion, comparison and evaluation. Tutorial activities, group discussions, online forums and formative assessment opportunities for examining each document according to the section headings for this assessment will occur throughout the term.

Format for developing your assessment response

1. Introduction Identify each curriculum document and the intended users or audience, i.e. the learners and teachers the framework has been designed for and the purpose that each framework is designed to achieve.

2. Organisation of the curriculum documents In this section, create a summary of each curriculum framework and its organisation and content. The summary should provide answers to the following key questions for EACH curriculum framework:

· What is included in the curriculum framework?

· What is the focus for learning specified in the curriculum framework?

· What information is given about what will be learned, when it will be learned and how it will be learned in each curriculum document?

· How will learning be assessed?

At the end of this summary, briefly identify the main similarities and differences in the approach to curriculum design taken for each document and explain why you think these differences have occurred. Suggest ways in which their organisation and key features will affect how the curriculum is used and implemented by teachers in schools or early learning sites.

3. Social, political and cultural influences

Provide a brief summary of “external factors” such as key social, political or cultural influences that you think have informed the development of each curriculum framework and compare and evaluate how successful each framework is in responding to the priorities for learning in the 21st century. Discuss any problems or issues that might affect the learning outcomes for different student groups as a result of these influences and back up your claims with examples and references from unit readings or the curriculum documents.

4. View of learners, learning and teaching

Summarise the view of learners and learning embedded in each document. Consider the responses to the following questions to construct your summary and support the point of view you are proposing. What learning theories are evident? What role do the documents imply for learners and for teachers? How do the frameworks support engagement and motivation for learning?

5. Evaluation


Evaluate the success of each document in terms of meeting the needs of diverse student groups and individuals. What implications can you draw about the way these documents should be used by teachers in the design of meaningful and relevant curriculum?

This assessment task addresses aspects of the following standards:

Task 1- 1.1,1.3, 3.5, 4.1, 4.2, 6.3.



Assessment Due Date

Week 6 Friday (30 Aug 2019) 11:45 pm AEST


Return Date to Students

Week 9 Friday (20 Sept 2019)

Week 9 Friday (20 Sep. 2019) Feedback on this assessment response will be provided by the return date above pending moderation processes being complete and in sufficient time to allow for academic support and advice as necessary to inform students’ responses to the next assessment task.


Weighting
50%

Assessment Criteria

Knowledge of the key elements and organisation of current curriculum documents. ( APST 1.3 Students with diverse linguistic, cultural, religious and socioeconomic backgrounds, APST 4.2 Manage classroom activities, APST 6.3 Engage with colleagues and improve practice.)

Ability to identify and evaluate ways in which current curriculum documents are influenced by contemporary social and cultural contexts and respond to issues of diversity and equity (APST 1.1 Physical, social and intellectual development and characteristics of students, APST 1.3 Students with diverse linguistic, cultural, religious and socioeconomic backgrounds, APST 3.5 Use effective classroom communication, APST 4.1 Support student participation.)

Application of knowledge of key learning theories to views of learning embedded in curriculum documents (APST 1.1 Physical, social and intellectual development and characteristics of students, APST 1.3 Students with diverse linguistic, cultural, religious and socioeconomic backgrounds, APST 3.5 Use effective classroom communication, 4.1 Support student participation, APST 4.2 Manage classroom activities.)

Ability to draw implications from the analysis for educators as curriculum decision-makers (APST 4.2 Manage classroom activities, APST 6.3 Engage with colleagues and improve practice.)

Ability to construct a comparative analysis using professional levels of personal literacy (APST 3.5 Use effective classroom communication.) 


Referencing Style

Submission
Online Group

Submission Instructions
Online

Learning Outcomes Assessed
  • Identify key ideas, contemporary influences and conflicting perspectives on curriculum development and planning
  • Evaluate the application of key learning theories to the goals and priorities of 21st century learning
  • Summarise the view of learners, teaching and learning articulated in current national curriculum documents and policies specific to educational and/or early childhood settings


Graduate Attributes
  • Communication
  • Critical Thinking
  • Information Literacy
  • Information Technology Competence

2 Practical and Written Assessment

Assessment Title
OBSERVATION OF TEACHING PRACTICE AND LEARNING DESIGN (PRACTICAL AND WRITTEN ASSESSMENT 50%

Task Description

This assessment task focuses on the design of student-centred learning and consists of two parts.

Part A (Individual Observation of teaching practice) On the moodle site for this unit you will find short video clips demonstrating learning in a particular setting. Choose one of the videos and complete a 500-word observation that answers the following questions:

  • How are the students learning in this sample of teaching practice?
  • What does the teacher do to facilitate student learning?
  • How does the learning experience achieve some or all of these outcomes:
    1.  encourage learners’ independence and autonomy
    2.  assist in the development of thinking skills
    3.  promote real life learning 
    4. embed meaningful literacy and/ or numeracy learning
    5.  allow for creativity and imagination
    6.  provide for child-centred or student-centred learning that caters for a diverse range of interests, needs and backgrounds
    7.  provide creative and / or challenging opportunities to stimulate learning in a developmentally appropriate way?


Part B (Individual, pairs or small group)

You have a choice of working individually, in pairs or small groups for this assessment task. Use the knowledge gained from unit readings and your observation from Part A above to design a learning environment or open-ended learning experience. Your planning should focus on an environmental or sustainability topic or issue that is developmentally appropriate for learners in a chosen educational setting, i.e. a school/ year level or other early learning setting. A template for recording your planning will be provided on the unit Moodle site and will require you to document the following:

  • An outline for an open-ended inquiry or investigation into a real world environmental issue suitable for diverse learner groups
  • Opportunities for enhancing literacy, numeracy or learning through the use of technology in the activities the learners complete,
  • Opportunities for social interaction and discussion between learners about the learning focus
  • Opportunities for learners to engage in problem-solving and higher-order thinking

Your plan will be presented to a group of your peers in Week 11 or 12 (depending on campus arrangements). The presentation should demonstrate some of your planning ideas and include a brief description of (a) how it has been designed to develop the knowledge, skills and dispositions underpinning a curriculum framework i.e. the general capabilities of the Australian curriculum OR the learning outcomes of the Early Years Learning Framework (EYLF); and (b) how a teacher might mediate or facilitate the learning.

Important Note: Each group member should upload Part A and documentation for Part B of this assessment task through the link on Moodle by the due date. This assessment task addresses aspects of the following standards:

Task 2- 1.1, 1.3, 3.5, 3.7, 4.1, 4.2, 6.2, 7.3.


Assessment Due Date

Review/Exam Week Monday (14 Oct 2019) 11:45 am AEST

Copies of both Part A and Part B should be uploaded by all students by the due date. Students who completed Part B as a group presentation should list the names of other group members on the Part B documentation.


Return Date to Students

Feedback on this final assessment response will be available after the date for Certification of Grades for the term


Weighting
50%

Minimum mark or grade
50%

Assessment Criteria

Ability to identify the relationship between observed teaching strategies and learning outcomes (APST 3.5 Use effective classroom communication, APST 3.7 Engage parents/carers in the educative process, APST 4.1 Support student participation, APST 4.2 Manage classroom activities.)

Knowledge and understanding of constructivist approaches to curriculum development that promote relevance, engagement and higher order thinking for learners from diverse backgrounds (APST 1.1 Physical, social and intellectual development and characteristics of students, APST 1.3 Students with diverse linguistic, cultural, religious and socioeconomic backgrounds, APST 4.1 Support student participation, APST 4.2 Manage classroom activities, APST 4.5 Use ICT safely, responsibly and ethically, APST 6.2 Engage in professional learning and improve practice, APST 7.3 Engage with the parents/carers.)

Ability to create opportunities for meaningful integration of literacy, numeracy and ICTs into curriculum planning (APST 4.5 Use ICT safely, responsibly and ethically.)

Knowledge of ways in which social interaction promotes learning (APST 1.1 Physical, social and intellectual development and characteristics of students, APST 1.3 Students with diverse linguistic, cultural, religious and socioeconomic backgrounds, APST 3.5 Use effective classroom communication.)

Application of pedagogical approaches consistent with the learning outcomes underpinning current curriculum frameworks (APST 1.3 Students with diverse linguistic, cultural, religious and socioeconomic backgrounds, APST 3.5 Use effective classroom communication, APST 3.7 Engage parents/carers in the educative process.)


Referencing Style

Submission
Online Group

Submission Instructions
Online

Learning Outcomes Assessed
  • Analyse examples of teaching practice to evaluate the selection of teaching strategies for child-centred learning for students with a diverse range of interests, backgrounds and needs
  • Design learning opportunities that incorporate a range of resources and strategies to promote language development, curiosity, inquiry, imagination, self-expression, higher-order thinking and problem-solving in a range of settings and learning areas.


Graduate Attributes
  • Communication
  • Problem Solving
  • Critical Thinking
  • Information Literacy
  • Team Work
  • Information Technology Competence

Academic Integrity Statement

As a CQUniversity student you are expected to act honestly in all aspects of your academic work.

Any assessable work undertaken or submitted for review or assessment must be your own work. Assessable work is any type of work you do to meet the assessment requirements in the unit, including draft work submitted for review and feedback and final work to be assessed.

When you use the ideas, words or data of others in your assessment, you must thoroughly and clearly acknowledge the source of this information by using the correct referencing style for your unit. Using others’ work without proper acknowledgement may be considered a form of intellectual dishonesty.

Participating honestly, respectfully, responsibly, and fairly in your university study ensures the CQUniversity qualification you earn will be valued as a true indication of your individual academic achievement and will continue to receive the respect and recognition it deserves.

As a student, you are responsible for reading and following CQUniversity’s policies, including the Student Academic Integrity Policy and Procedure. This policy sets out CQUniversity’s expectations of you to act with integrity, examples of academic integrity breaches to avoid, the processes used to address alleged breaches of academic integrity, and potential penalties.

What is a breach of academic integrity?

A breach of academic integrity includes but is not limited to plagiarism, self-plagiarism, collusion, cheating, contract cheating, and academic misconduct. The Student Academic Integrity Policy and Procedure defines what these terms mean and gives examples.

Why is academic integrity important?

A breach of academic integrity may result in one or more penalties, including suspension or even expulsion from the University. It can also have negative implications for student visas and future enrolment at CQUniversity or elsewhere. Students who engage in contract cheating also risk being blackmailed by contract cheating services.

Where can I get assistance?

For academic advice and guidance, the Academic Learning Centre (ALC) can support you in becoming confident in completing assessments with integrity and of high standard.

What can you do to act with integrity?