CQUniversity Unit Profile
ENEM14015 Dynamic System Modelling and Control
Dynamic System Modelling and Control
All details in this unit profile for ENEM14015 have been officially approved by CQUniversity and represent a learning partnership between the University and you (our student).
The information will not be changed unless absolutely necessary and any change will be clearly indicated by an approved correction included in the profile.
General Information

Overview

This project-based learning unit examines the behaviour of mechanical systems. You will apply knowledge of engineering science and mathematics to model and analyse mechanical systems and consider the nature of engineering assumptions, and the effects of uncertainty on modelling and analysis. You will apply vibration and control theory, design and analyse linear and non-linear mathematical models and use simulation software to predict the behaviour of mechanical systems in the industry. You will have opportunities to work individually and in teams to complete projects and to develop interpersonal and technical communication skills. You will prepare professional documentation of problem solutions and project reports. Online students are required to have access to a computer. In this unit, you must complete compulsory practical activities. Refer to the Engineering Undergraduate Course Moodle site for proposed dates.

Details

Career Level: Undergraduate
Unit Level: Level 4
Credit Points: 12
Student Contribution Band: 8
Fraction of Full-Time Student Load: 0.25

Pre-requisites or Co-requisites

Pre-requisites: (ENEM12007 Statics and Dynamics or ENEM12010 Engineering Dynamics) and MATH12225 Applied Computational Modelling

Important note: Students enrolled in a subsequent unit who failed their pre-requisite unit, should drop the subsequent unit before the census date or within 10 working days of Fail grade notification. Students who do not drop the unit in this timeframe cannot later drop the unit without academic and financial liability. See details in the Assessment Policy and Procedure (Higher Education Coursework).

Offerings For Term 2 - 2022

Bundaberg
Cairns
Gladstone
Mackay
Mixed Mode
Rockhampton

Attendance Requirements

All on-campus students are expected to attend scheduled classes – in some units, these classes are identified as a mandatory (pass/fail) component and attendance is compulsory. International students, on a student visa, must maintain a full time study load and meet both attendance and academic progress requirements in each study period (satisfactory attendance for International students is defined as maintaining at least an 80% attendance record).

Residential Schools

This unit has a Compulsory Residential School for distance mode students and the details are:
Click here to see your Residential School Timetable.

Class and Assessment Overview

Recommended Student Time Commitment

Each 12-credit Undergraduate unit at CQUniversity requires an overall time commitment of an average of 25 hours of study per week, making a total of 300 hours for the unit.

Class Timetable

Bundaberg, Cairns, Emerald, Gladstone, Mackay, Rockhampton, Townsville
Adelaide, Brisbane, Melbourne, Perth, Sydney

Assessment Overview

1. Project (applied)
Weighting: 20%
2. Project (applied)
Weighting: 25%
3. Laboratory/Practical
Weighting: 25%
4. Portfolio
Weighting: 30%

Assessment Grading

This is a graded unit: your overall grade will be calculated from the marks or grades for each assessment task, based on the relative weightings shown in the table above. You must obtain an overall mark for the unit of at least 50%, or an overall grade of ‘pass’ in order to pass the unit. If any ‘pass/fail’ tasks are shown in the table above they must also be completed successfully (‘pass’ grade). You must also meet any minimum mark requirements specified for a particular assessment task, as detailed in the ‘assessment task’ section (note that in some instances, the minimum mark for a task may be greater than 50%). Consult the University’s Grades and Results Policy for more details of interim results and final grades.

Previous Student Feedback

Feedback, Recommendations and Responses

Every unit is reviewed for enhancement each year. At the most recent review, the following staff and student feedback items were identified and recommendations were made.

Feedback from Student survey

Feedback

The unit was very well organised and readily available to review at any time.

Recommendation

The current content structure will be continued for future terms.

Feedback from Student survey

Feedback

Some of the material was very useful for the completion of the assessments. The assessments were enjoyable and did assist in learning the content.

Recommendation

The current contents will be continued for future terms.

Feedback from Student survey

Feedback

The lab videos were generally of poor quality and at times did not even show the experiment being performed.

Recommendation

This has happened due to the COVID-19 situation. Once the residential school is back this issue will be resolved.

Feedback from Student survey

Feedback

The first 2-3 weeks of computer labs need to be engaging from the start so students follow them for the term.

Recommendation

Efforts will be made to engage students from the very beginning of the computer lab class.

Unit Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this unit, you will be able to:
  1. Design mathematical models that analyse and evaluate mechanical systems
  2. Apply control theory and control system approaches to mechanical systems
  3. Justify the role of engineering assumptions in building mathematical models of mechanical systems
  4. Relate theory to problems of introducing, operating and maintaining mechanical systems in the industrial context
  5. Identify and evaluate engineering uncertainty and the limitations of mathematical models
  6. Work collaboratively in a team to produce high quality outputs
  7. Create professional documentation using mechanical systems terminology, symbols and diagrams.

The Learning Outcomes for this unit are linked with the Engineers Australia Stage 1 Competency Standards for Professional Engineers in the areas of 1. Knowledge and Skill Base, 2. Engineering Application Ability and 3. Professional and Personal Attributes at the following levels:

Introductory
3.1 Ethical conduct and professional accountability. (LO: 1N 7N )

Intermediate
1.5 Knowledge of engineering design practice and contextual factors impacting the engineering discipline. (LO: 1I 2I 3N 4N )
3.2 Effective oral and written communication in professional and lay domains. (LO: 1I 2I 3N 4I 5I 6I 7I )

Advanced
1.1 Comprehensive, theory-based understanding of the underpinning natural and physical sciences and the engineering fundamentals applicable to the engineering discipline. (LO: 1A 2A 3I 4I 5N 6I )
1.2 Conceptual understanding of the mathematics, numerical analysis, statistics, and computer and information sciences which underpin the engineering discipline. (LO: 1A 2A 3I 4I 5I 6A )
1.3 In-depth understanding of specialist bodies of knowledge within the engineering discipline. (LO: 1A 2A 3I 4I 5I 6I )
1.4 Discernment of knowledge development and research directions within the engineering discipline. (LO: 1A 2A 3I 4I 5I 6I )
1.6 Understanding of the scope, principles, norms, accountabilities and bounds of sustainable engineering practice in the specific discipline. (LO: 1A 2A 3I 4I 5I 6A )
2.1 Application of established engineering methods to complex engineering problem solving. (LO: 1A 2I 3I 4I 5A 6I 7I )
2.2 Fluent application of engineering techniques, tools and resources. (LO: 1I 2I 3A 4A 5A 7I )
2.3 Application of systematic engineering synthesis and design processes. (LO: 1I 2I 3I 4A 5A 6I 7I )
2.4 Application of systematic approaches to the conduct and management of engineering projects. (LO: 1A 3A 4A 5A 6A 7A )
3.3 Creative, innovative and pro-active demeanour. (LO: 1I 2I 4A 5I 6I 7I )
3.4 Professional use and management of information. (LO: 1I 2I 3N 4I 5N 6A 7I )
3.5 Orderly management of self, and professional conduct. (LO: 1A 2I 3I 5I 6A 7I )
3.6 Effective team membership and team leadership. (LO: 1I 2I 3I 4I 5I 6I 7A )

Note: LO refers to the Learning Outcome number(s) which link to the competency and the levels: N – Introductory, I – Intermediate and A - Advanced.

Refer to the Engineering Undergraduate Course Moodle site for further information on the Engineers Australia's Stage 1 Competency Standard for Professional Engineers and course level mapping information
https://moodle.cqu.edu.au/course/view.php?id=1511

Alignment of Learning Outcomes, Assessment and Graduate Attributes
N/A Level
Introductory Level
Intermediate Level
Graduate Level
Professional Level
Advanced Level

Alignment of Assessment Tasks to Learning Outcomes

Assessment Tasks Learning Outcomes
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
1 - Project (applied) - 20%
2 - Project (applied) - 25%
3 - Laboratory/Practical - 25%
4 - Portfolio - 30%

Alignment of Graduate Attributes to Learning Outcomes

Graduate Attributes Learning Outcomes
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
1 - Communication
2 - Problem Solving
3 - Critical Thinking
4 - Information Literacy
5 - Team Work
6 - Information Technology Competence
7 - Cross Cultural Competence
8 - Ethical practice
9 - Social Innovation
10 - Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Cultures

Alignment of Assessment Tasks to Graduate Attributes

Assessment Tasks Graduate Attributes
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
1 - Project (applied) - 20%
2 - Project (applied) - 25%
3 - Laboratory/Practical - 25%
4 - Portfolio - 30%
Textbooks and Resources

Textbooks

Supplementary

Mechanical Vibrations in SI Units

Edition: 6th edn (2017)
Authors: Rao, S
Pearson
Harlow Harlow , Essex , UK
ISBN: 9781292178608
Binding: Paperback
Supplementary

Modeling And Analysis Of Dynamic Systems

Edition: 3rd edn (2001)
Authors: Close, C, Frederick, D, Newell, J
John Wiley and Sons
Southern Gate Southern Gate , Chicester , UK
ISBN: 9780471394426
Binding: Paperback
Supplementary

Theory of Vibrations with Applications

Edition: 5th edn ( Pearson New International Version) (2013)
Authors: Thomson, W
Pearson
Harlow Harlow , Essex , UK
ISBN: 9781292042718
Binding: Paperback

IT Resources

You will need access to the following IT resources:
  • CQUniversity Student Email
  • Internet
  • Unit Website (Moodle)
  • CNS, MKY, GLD and BDG students will also benefit if they have a laptop they can bring to the computer labs and tutorial sessions.
  • 3.5mm or USB Integrated headphones/microphone headset to be used in the computer labs zoom sessions (for CNS, MKY, GLD, BDG and MIX students)
  • A4 document scanner required for MIX students to scan any written work into their final portfolio submission
  • MATLAB and Simulink Suite Software (For students without access to a CQUni campus), see the Textbook and Resources section for more information. MIX students may be eligible for a complementary licence, email a.jayasuriya@cqu.edu.au for more details.
Referencing Style

All submissions for this unit must use the referencing style: Harvard (author-date)

For further information, see the Assessment Tasks.

Teaching Contacts
Neamul Khandoker Unit Coordinator
n.khandoker@cqu.edu.au
Schedule
Week 1 Begin Date: 11 Jul 2022

Module/Topic

Review of Mechanical Vibrations

Project #1 - Mechanical Vibration Modelling

Chapter

Close: Ch: 1, 2, 3, 4, 8, 9, 14 ; Thomas: Ch: 1, 2, 3, 4

Events and Submissions/Topic

Computer Lab: Introduction to Matlab and Simulink

Tutorial: Free Vibration

MIX students are encouraged to join the Computer Lab and Tutorial Sessions via ZOOM online meeting. The times and connection link will be available on Moodle.

Week 2 Begin Date: 18 Jul 2022

Module/Topic

Analysis of Vibratory Systems – Mathematical Theories and Modelling Approaches

Chapter

Close: Ch: 1, 2, 3, 4, 8, 9, 14 ; Thomas: Ch: 1, 2, 3, 4

Events and Submissions/Topic

Computer Lab: 1 DOF modelling in Matlab and Simulink

Tutorial: Damped Vibration

Experimental Laboratory 1: Whirling of Shafts*

*Estimated timing, see Moodle for the timing of experimental laboratories for your campus. All labs for MIX and ROK students, will be in Week 4.

Week 3 Begin Date: 25 Jul 2022

Module/Topic

Forced Vibration and Support Motion Vibration Modelling

Chapter

Close: Ch: 2, 3, 4, 7, 8, 9, 14, Thomas: Ch: 1, 2, 3, 4

Events and Submissions/Topic

Computer Lab: Forced Vibration and Non-linear Modelling

Tutorial: Forced Vibration

Residential School/Laboratories for students. Please check moodle for details.

Week 4 Begin Date: 01 Aug 2022

Module/Topic

Two Degrees of Freedom Modelling

Chapter

Close: Ch: 2, 3, 4, 7, 8, 9, 14, Thomas: Ch: 1, 2, 3, 4

Events and Submissions/Topic

Computer Lab: 2 DOF modelling in Matlab and Simulink

Tutorial: Forced Vibration

Experimental Laboratory 2: Torsional Vibration*

*Estimated timing, see Moodle for the timing of experimental laboratories for your campus.

Residential School/Laboratories for students. Please check moodle for details.

Week 5 Begin Date: 08 Aug 2022

Module/Topic

Multiple Degrees of Freedom Modelling

Chapter

Close: Ch: 2, 3, 4, 7, 8, 9, 14 , Thomas: Ch: 4, 5, 6, 8.

Events and Submissions/Topic

Computer Lab: Multiple DOF modelling in Matlab and Simulink

Tutorial: Mode Shapes

Vacation Week Begin Date: 15 Aug 2022

Module/Topic

Vacation Week

Chapter


Events and Submissions/Topic


Week 6 Begin Date: 22 Aug 2022

Module/Topic

Control System Theory

Project #2 - Application of Mechanical Control

Chapter

Close: Ch: 5, 7, 8, 9, 14, 15 , Thomas: Ch: 4, 5, 6, 8

Events and Submissions/Topic

Computer Lab: PID Controller

Tutorial: Control Block Diagrams

Experimental Laboratory 3: Mass Balance*

*Estimated timing, see Moodle for the timing of experimental laboratories for your campus.


Project 1: Mechanical Vibration Modelling Due: Week 6 Friday (26 Aug 2022) 11:45 pm AEST
Week 7 Begin Date: 29 Aug 2022

Module/Topic

Control System Stability

Chapter

Close: Ch: 5, 7, 8, 9, 14, 15 , Thomas: Ch: 4, 5, 6, 8

Events and Submissions/Topic

Computer Lab: Analysis of Controllers

Tutorial: Control Stability Calculations

Week 8 Begin Date: 05 Sep 2022

Module/Topic

Noise and Delay in Control Systems

Chapter

Close: Ch: 5, 7, 8, 9, 14, 15 , Thomas: Ch: 4, 5, 6, 8

Events and Submissions/Topic

Computer Lab: Combination of Control, Vibration Modelling and Kinematics

Tutorial: Noise and Delay in Control Calculations

Experimental Laboratory 4: Free Vibration*

*Estimated timing, see Moodle for the timing of experimental laboratories for your campus.

Week 9 Begin Date: 12 Sep 2022

Module/Topic

 Real Data Modelling and System Commissioning

Chapter

Close: Ch: 5, 7, 8, 9, 14, 15 , Thomas: Ch: 4, 5, 6, 8

Events and Submissions/Topic

Computer Lab: Help on finalizing Project #2

Tutorial: Help on finalizing Project #2

Week 10 Begin Date: 19 Sep 2022

Module/Topic

Portfolio Expectations and Introduction to Demonstration Questions

Chapter


Events and Submissions/Topic

Computer Lab: Collating the Portfolio

Tutorial: Portfolio and Demonstration Questions Clarification

Experimental Laboratory 5: Forced Vibration*

*Estimated timing, see Moodle for the timing of experimental laboratories for your campus.


Project 2: Application of Mechanical Control Due: Week 10 Friday (23 Sept 2022) 11:45 pm AEST
Laboratory Reports Due: Week 10 Friday (23 Sept 2022) 11:45 pm AEST
Week 11 Begin Date: 26 Sep 2022

Module/Topic

Theory Review

Chapter


Events and Submissions/Topic

Computer Lab: Review of Modelling with Matlab and Simulink

Tutorial: Review of Vibration and Control Theory Application

Week 12 Begin Date: 03 Oct 2022

Module/Topic

Portfolio Finalization

Chapter


Events and Submissions/Topic

Computer Lab: Portfolio Finalization

Tutorial: Portfolio Finalization


Portfolio of Individual Work Due: Week 12 Friday (7 Oct 2022) 11:45 pm AEST
Review/Exam Week Begin Date: 10 Oct 2022

Module/Topic


Chapter


Events and Submissions/Topic


Exam Week Begin Date: 17 Oct 2022

Module/Topic

Chapter

Events and Submissions/Topic

Assessment Tasks

1 Project (applied)

Assessment Title
Project 2: Application of Mechanical Control

Task Description

Project 2 is a team project consisting of 4 to 5 students. The project applies mechanical control and control theory analysis to a mechanical system. Control is applied to a simple single degree of freedom model through to multiple degrees of freedom model. Three types of modelling and analysis will be used, including the use of control theory, Matlab and Simulink software packages. The project instructions will provide details on the core elements required from the application of control through to analysis, discussion and conclusions. The full details of the project are on the Moodle site (available 2 weeks prior to the term). The team project contributes to the units final grade and also provides learning and evidence required for the Individual portfolio submission. To pass the unit, involvement in the team project needs to be demonstrated.


Assessment Due Date

Week 10 Friday (23 Sept 2022) 11:45 pm AEST


Return Date to Students

Week 12 Friday (7 Oct 2022)

Reports will be returned two weeks after submission.


Weighting
20%

Minimum mark or grade
25%.

Assessment Criteria

While this is a team report, each member of the team may receive varying grades. In the final report, the team will be asked to specify each members percentage contribution in the project. This percentage contribution will be used to determine the grade each student will receive. To help with team management the percent contribution should be discussed at the beginning of the project and at the end of the project. Each team member should reference their own contributions in the team report by use of the Harvard author-date system i.e. (McClanachan 2018).


The team report will be graded on the main elements of the application of control through to analysis, discussion and conclusions. The report should also be professionally presented, clearly show and explain the development of the control system, equations, models including any assumptions or limitations of the control system and analysis. To maximise time spent on the unit's core aim it is recommended that diagrams are hand-drawn and any mathematical equations or working be handwritten and scanned into the document. The report should be written and contain enough detail such that an engineer could understand, check and if necessary repeat the work described. A detailed marking criteria specific to the project elements is available on the Moodle site (available two weeks prior to the start of the term).


Referencing Style

Submission
Online Group

Submission Instructions
Each team shall submit one report as a pdf document, plus the submission of a zip file containing all the associated Simulink, Matlab and Excel files.

Learning Outcomes Assessed
  • Design mathematical models that analyse and evaluate mechanical systems
  • Work collaboratively in a team to produce high quality outputs


Graduate Attributes
  • Communication
  • Problem Solving
  • Critical Thinking
  • Information Literacy
  • Team Work
  • Information Technology Competence
  • Cross Cultural Competence
  • Ethical practice

2 Project (applied)

Assessment Title
Project 1: Mechanical Vibration Modelling

Task Description

Project 1 is a team project consisting of 4 to 5 students. The project includes the mechanical vibration modelling and analysis of a mechanical system from a simple single degree of freedom through to multiple degrees of freedom analysis. Three types of modelling and analysis will be used, including mechanical vibration theory, Matlab and Simulink software packages. The project instructions will provide details on the core elements required from modelling through to analysis, discussion and conclusions. The full details of the project is on the Moodle site (available 2 weeks prior to the term). The team project contributes to the units final grade and also provides learning and evidence required for the Individual portfolio submission. To pass the unit, involvement in the team project needs to be demonstrated.


Assessment Due Date

Week 6 Friday (26 Aug 2022) 11:45 pm AEST


Return Date to Students

Week 8 Friday (9 Sept 2022)

Reports will be returned two weeks after submission.


Weighting
25%

Minimum mark or grade
25%

Assessment Criteria

While this is a team report, each member of the team may receive varying grades. In the final report, the team will be asked to specify each members percentage contribution in the project. This percentage contribution will be used to determine the grade each student will receive. To help with team management the percent contribution should be discussed at the beginning of the project and at the end of the project. Each team member should reference their own contributions in the team report by use of the Harvard author-date system i.e. (McClanachan 2018).


The team report will be graded on the main elements of modelling through to analysis, discussion and conclusions. The report should also be professionally presented, clearly show and explain the development of modelling equations, models including any assumptions or limitations of the analysis. To maximise time spent on the unit's core aim it is recommended that diagrams are hand-drawn and any mathematical equations or working be handwritten and scanned into the document. The report should be written and contain enough detail such that an engineer could understand, check and if necessary repeat the work described. A detailed marking criteria specific to the project elements is available on the Moodle site (available two weeks prior to the start of the term).


Referencing Style

Submission
Online Group

Submission Instructions
Each team shall submit one report as a pdf document, plus the submission of a zip file containing all the associated Simulink, Matlab and Excel files.

Learning Outcomes Assessed
  • Apply control theory and control system approaches to mechanical systems
  • Work collaboratively in a team to produce high quality outputs


Graduate Attributes
  • Communication
  • Problem Solving
  • Critical Thinking
  • Information Literacy
  • Team Work
  • Information Technology Competence
  • Cross Cultural Competence
  • Ethical practice

3 Laboratory/Practical

Assessment Title
Laboratory Reports

Task Description

The experimental laboratories will begin in Week 2. The schedule of the laboratory classes will be announced in week -1.

There is a compulsory experimental laboratory program in the unit to aid your understanding in the area of mechanical vibration fundamentals. All students, Internal and Mix mode, will complete a full laboratory program. Attendance at the laboratories is required to pass the unit. The laboratories topics include:

- Whirling Shafts

- Torsional Vibration

- Mass Balancing

- Free Damped Vibration

- Forced Damped Vibration

Rockhampton and Mix mode students will complete the laboratory program during the Residential school (see the Residential School Timetable link under the 'General Information' heading of this document). The timing of the laboratories for other on-campus students will be determined in Week 1 via consultation between the students and the lab technician. Mix mode students may make a request to the Unit Coordinator to attend the laboratory sessions at other campuses (however these typically will at multiple times during the term).

While the laboratories will be done in groups of 4 to 5 students, each student is to submit their own individual laboratory reports. Use the group environment to confirm and check measurements and application of theory and sample calculations however the presentation of results, discussion and reflections should be your own individual work.

The laboratory reports will include the measurements, results, calculations, discussion and reflections (the laboratory sheets are available on the Moodle site). Laboratory reports are due one week following the laboratory, please refer to the assessment submission block on the Moodle site for exact the due dates.


Assessment Due Date

Week 10 Friday (23 Sept 2022) 11:45 pm AEST

Laboratory Reports are due one week following the completion of each laboratory. ROK and MIX students the lab reports are due 9am Monday Week 8.


Return Date to Students

Week 12 Friday (7 Oct 2022)

Laboratory Reports will be returned two weeks after submission.


Weighting
25%

Minimum mark or grade
50%

Assessment Criteria

Each student is to submit their own individual laboratory reports. Students are requested to show the measurements, calculations, results, discussion and required reflections as detailed in the laboratory sheets provided in Moodle. The laboratory reports should not contain work by any other student.


Five reports are required, each worth 5% of the unit's final grade.


The reports will be graded on accuracy of measurements, correct application of theoretical calculations, presentation of results, discussion and comparison to theory, further understanding shown in the required reflections and overall presentation. To maximise time spent on the unit's core aim it is recommended that diagrams are hand-drawn and any mathematical equations or working be handwritten and scanned into the document.


As the theory is presented on the laboratory sheets it is not required to repeat or explain the background to the theory. However, the equations used in the calculations should be shown with some sample calculations and any additional description of your analysis. The remainder of calculations can be submitted in the appendix or calculated with the use of a MS Excel spreadsheet. Any additional files the student has used should be submitted along with the laboratory report pdf file.


Referencing Style

Submission
Online

Submission Instructions
Submit the report as a pdf plus the submission of a zip file containing any associated MS Excel files.

Learning Outcomes Assessed
  • Relate theory to problems of introducing, operating and maintaining mechanical systems in the industrial context


Graduate Attributes
  • Communication
  • Problem Solving
  • Critical Thinking
  • Information Literacy
  • Information Technology Competence
  • Ethical practice

4 Portfolio

Assessment Title
Portfolio of Individual Work

Task Description

The Portfolio of Individual Work is a record of your individual journey through this unit. It should include your own work on the projects, tutorial questions, worked examples, demonstration questions and team management contributions. To maximise time spent on the unit's core aim it is recommended that diagrams are hand-drawn and any mathematical equations or working be handwritten and scanned into the document. The portfolio should only contain work which you completed. Any contributions by others should not be included. Descriptions of the parts of the portfolio are listed below:


- Reflective Journal

In the reflective journal section of the portfolio, students will reflect on what they have set out to learn, how they have approached their learning, what they have achieved, where in industry they could apply what was learnt and what they would do differently in future to improve. The journal should also include reflections on management and teamwork skills learnt during the unit.


- Workbook

The workbook section should contain your own work on the team projects. It is suggested to keep an exercise pad to record any handwritten work done on the projects this work can then be scanned and added into your portfolio. Provide suitable headings to describe the work and include the date. Work by others should not be included. Use the reflective journal to record your input into team discussions and management. The workbook should contain screenshots of software code or models you created with some brief commentary. The workbook should also contain any tutorial questions or worked examples you completed, however, these should not be a direct copy of any solutions provided but should help to show your understanding of the unit's material. Students are encouraged to include their own exploration of the unit content by individually extending tutorial work or correcting parts of the team projects.


- Demonstration Questions

A selection of optional demonstration questions will be made available on the Moodle for students to complete and include in their final portfolio. Completing these questions will assist students to demonstrate their individual ability. A high involvement in the projects will help with the demonstration questions. As suggested earlier to save time it is recommended that diagrams and any mathematical equations or working be handwritten and scanned into the document.

Without any Demonstration Questions or other individual work it will be very difficult to attain a Distinction or High Distinction Level, unless you can demonstrate an exceptional level of involvement in the projects.


- Supporting Matlab, Simulink and Excel Spreadsheet files

In the portfolio submission, include any files you created during the unit. The files should have appropriate file names and be named in your portfolio document. If a file is not entirely your own work you should clearly indicate your contribution in the comments section of the file or elsewhere in the final portfolio document. Compress the files into a single 'zip' archive and submit the zip file along with the written portfolio document.


Assessment Due Date

Week 12 Friday (7 Oct 2022) 11:45 pm AEST


Return Date to Students

Feedback will be provided on Certification of Grades date.


Weighting
30%

Minimum mark or grade
50%

Assessment Criteria

The portfolio will be used to assess your: contributions to the team projects, increase in knowledge, effective management of yourself and others, team collaboration, communication and documentation of technical work. Students are expected to nominate a grade that they consider should be awarded. This must be clearly substantiated with evidences of individual work in support of such claims. These claims will be assessed based on the how well the material in the portfolio demonstrates your ability and understanding regarding the unit's material.

The award of grade will depend the student’s demonstrated individual achievement of the learning outcomes of the unit, the student’s involvement in the team projects and the holistic development of each student. A detailed Portfolio Assessment Criteria Matrix is available on the Moodle unit site which will be inline with CQUniversity's Grades and Results Policy, see extract below:

Grade and description
Range of marks
High Distinction Demonstrates imagination, originality or flair, based on proficiency in all the learning outcomes of the unit; work is interesting or surprisingly exciting, challenging, well-read or scholarly.
Composite mark in the range 84.50% and above (85 – 100% when rounded to the nearest integer).
Distinction Demonstrates awareness and understanding of deeper and less obvious aspects of the unit, such as ability to identify and debate critical issues or problems, ability to solve non‐routine problems, ability to adapt and apply ideas to new situations, and ability to invent and evaluate new ideas.
Composite mark in the range of 74.50 – 84.49% (75 – 84% when rounded to the nearest integer).
Credit Demonstrates ability to use and apply fundamental concepts and skills of the unit, going beyond mere replication of content knowledge or skill to show understanding of key ideas, awareness of their relevance, some use of analytical skills, and some originality or insight.
Composite mark in the range of 64.50 – 74.49% (65 – 74% when rounded to the nearest integer).
Pass Demonstrates the learning outcomes of the unit, such as knowledge of fundamental concepts and performance of basic skills; demonstrates sufficient quality of performance to be considered satisfactory or adequate or competent or capable in relation to the learning outcomes of the unit.
Composite mark in the range 49.50 – 64.49% (50 – 64% when rounded to the nearest integer).


Referencing Style

Submission
Online

Submission Instructions
Submit the portfolio as a pdf, plus the submission of a zip file containing all the associated Simulink, Matlab and Excel files.

Learning Outcomes Assessed
  • Justify the role of engineering assumptions in building mathematical models of mechanical systems
  • Identify and evaluate engineering uncertainty and the limitations of mathematical models
  • Create professional documentation using mechanical systems terminology, symbols and diagrams.


Graduate Attributes
  • Communication
  • Problem Solving
  • Critical Thinking
  • Information Technology Competence
  • Ethical practice

Academic Integrity Statement

As a CQUniversity student you are expected to act honestly in all aspects of your academic work.

Any assessable work undertaken or submitted for review or assessment must be your own work. Assessable work is any type of work you do to meet the assessment requirements in the unit, including draft work submitted for review and feedback and final work to be assessed.

When you use the ideas, words or data of others in your assessment, you must thoroughly and clearly acknowledge the source of this information by using the correct referencing style for your unit. Using others’ work without proper acknowledgement may be considered a form of intellectual dishonesty.

Participating honestly, respectfully, responsibly, and fairly in your university study ensures the CQUniversity qualification you earn will be valued as a true indication of your individual academic achievement and will continue to receive the respect and recognition it deserves.

As a student, you are responsible for reading and following CQUniversity’s policies, including the Student Academic Integrity Policy and Procedure. This policy sets out CQUniversity’s expectations of you to act with integrity, examples of academic integrity breaches to avoid, the processes used to address alleged breaches of academic integrity, and potential penalties.

What is a breach of academic integrity?

A breach of academic integrity includes but is not limited to plagiarism, self-plagiarism, collusion, cheating, contract cheating, and academic misconduct. The Student Academic Integrity Policy and Procedure defines what these terms mean and gives examples.

Why is academic integrity important?

A breach of academic integrity may result in one or more penalties, including suspension or even expulsion from the University. It can also have negative implications for student visas and future enrolment at CQUniversity or elsewhere. Students who engage in contract cheating also risk being blackmailed by contract cheating services.

Where can I get assistance?

For academic advice and guidance, the Academic Learning Centre (ALC) can support you in becoming confident in completing assessments with integrity and of high standard.

What can you do to act with integrity?