CQUniversity Unit Profile
ENEV12002 First Nations and Community Engagement
First Nations and Community Engagement
All details in this unit profile for ENEV12002 have been officially approved by CQUniversity and represent a learning partnership between the University and you (our student).
The information will not be changed unless absolutely necessary and any change will be clearly indicated by an approved correction included in the profile.
General Information

Overview

In this unit you will critique approaches to First Nations and community engagement within the environmental and agricultural management sector. You will study aspects of post-colonialism, sustainable environmental and agricultural management and cultural heritage, as well as examine applied stakeholder relationships and adaptive management approaches. Drawing on transdisciplinary perspectives from First Nations studies, community development, history, planning, and sociology, you will learn to evaluate the requirements of First Nations and community engagement, and develop a professional approach to this aspect of environmental and agricultural management.

Details

Career Level: Undergraduate
Unit Level: Level 2
Credit Points: 6
Student Contribution Band: 8
Fraction of Full-Time Student Load: 0.125

Pre-requisites or Co-requisites

There are no requisites for this unit.

Important note: Students enrolled in a subsequent unit who failed their pre-requisite unit, should drop the subsequent unit before the census date or within 10 working days of Fail grade notification. Students who do not drop the unit in this timeframe cannot later drop the unit without academic and financial liability. See details in the Assessment Policy and Procedure (Higher Education Coursework).

Offerings For Term 3 - 2021

Online

Attendance Requirements

All on-campus students are expected to attend scheduled classes – in some units, these classes are identified as a mandatory (pass/fail) component and attendance is compulsory. International students, on a student visa, must maintain a full time study load and meet both attendance and academic progress requirements in each study period (satisfactory attendance for International students is defined as maintaining at least an 80% attendance record).

Class and Assessment Overview

Recommended Student Time Commitment

Each 6-credit Undergraduate unit at CQUniversity requires an overall time commitment of an average of 12.5 hours of study per week, making a total of 150 hours for the unit.

Class Timetable

Bundaberg, Cairns, Emerald, Gladstone, Mackay, Rockhampton, Townsville
Adelaide, Brisbane, Melbourne, Perth, Sydney

Assessment Overview

1. Group Discussion
Weighting: Pass/Fail
2. Case Study
Weighting: 40%
3. Written Assessment
Weighting: 60%

Assessment Grading

This is a graded unit: your overall grade will be calculated from the marks or grades for each assessment task, based on the relative weightings shown in the table above. You must obtain an overall mark for the unit of at least 50%, or an overall grade of ‘pass’ in order to pass the unit. If any ‘pass/fail’ tasks are shown in the table above they must also be completed successfully (‘pass’ grade). You must also meet any minimum mark requirements specified for a particular assessment task, as detailed in the ‘assessment task’ section (note that in some instances, the minimum mark for a task may be greater than 50%). Consult the University’s Grades and Results Policy for more details of interim results and final grades.

Previous Student Feedback

Feedback, Recommendations and Responses

Every unit is reviewed for enhancement each year. At the most recent review, the following staff and student feedback items were identified and recommendations were made.

Feedback from Have Your Say written feedback

Feedback

Assessment design and grading are confusing.

Recommendation

Assessment design will be changed to be more intuitive, and the grading structure will be more clearly outlined in Week 1 of the unit.

Feedback from Have Your Say written feedback

Feedback

Lecturer was unfamiliar with the Moodle Tile format and gradebook.

Recommendation

Moodle Tiles were new to the university in 2020. The unit Coordinator and Lecturer will continue to familiarise themselves with Moodle Tiles, and simplifications made to the gradebook made in 2020 should carry over to 2021.

Feedback from Have Your Say written feedback

Feedback

Students were pleased to have an Australian First Nations person teaching the unit and found her experience and perspective valuable.

Recommendation

That we always attempt to engage an Australian First Nations person to teach and lecture into this unit.

Feedback from Lecturer

Feedback

Low Feedback response rates

Recommendation

The lecturer will remind students to complete the Have Your Say feedback response with more frequent emails and reminders in lecture.

Unit Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this unit, you will be able to:
  1. Discuss the importance of cultural and historical awareness of First Nations and community engagement within Australia and overseas
  2. Identify the implications of top-down/bottom-up approaches to engagement in environmental and agricultural management
  3. Develop basic First Nations and community engagement plans based on adaptive management principles
  4. Prepare an engagement section of an environmental and agricultural management planning report
  5. Critique the key issues that shape contemporary discourses of First Nations and community engagement

NA

Alignment of Learning Outcomes, Assessment and Graduate Attributes
N/A Level
Introductory Level
Intermediate Level
Graduate Level
Professional Level
Advanced Level

Alignment of Assessment Tasks to Learning Outcomes

Assessment Tasks Learning Outcomes
1 2 3 4 5
1 - Group Discussion - 0%
2 - Case Study - 40%
3 - Written Assessment - 60%

Alignment of Graduate Attributes to Learning Outcomes

Graduate Attributes Learning Outcomes
1 2 3 4 5
1 - Communication
2 - Problem Solving
3 - Critical Thinking
4 - Information Literacy
5 - Team Work
6 - Information Technology Competence
7 - Cross Cultural Competence
8 - Ethical practice
9 - Social Innovation
Textbooks and Resources

Textbooks

There are no required textbooks.

IT Resources

You will need access to the following IT resources:
  • CQUniversity Student Email
  • Internet
  • Unit Website (Moodle)
  • ZOOM
Referencing Style

All submissions for this unit must use the referencing style: Harvard (author-date)

For further information, see the Assessment Tasks.

Teaching Contacts
Sherie Bruce Unit Coordinator
s.bruce@cqu.edu.au
Amie Anastasi Unit Coordinator
a.anastasi@cqu.edu.au
Schedule
Principles of community engagement in environmental planning (Week 1) Begin Date: 08 Nov 2021

Module/Topic

Principles of community engagement in environmental planning

Reading and notetaking (optional)

Chapter

Cavaye, J.M. 2004 Governance and community engagement. In W.R Loval and R. Shaffer (Eds.) The Australian experience in participatory governance: Planning, conflict mediation and public decision making in civil society. Ashgate Publishing, UK, pp 85-102.




Marshall, N., Steinmetz, C. and R. Zehner 2012 Community participation in planning. In S. Thompson and P.J. Maginn (Eds.) Planning Australia (2nd Ed). Cambridge University Press, New York, pp 276-293.

Events and Submissions/Topic

Introduce yourself!

Study guide

Lecture

Readings

Prepare summary of readings

History of community and Indigenous engagement (Week 2) Begin Date: 15 Nov 2021

Module/Topic

History of community and Indigenous engagement


Chapter

Foley, G. 2010 A short history of the Australian Indigenous Resistance 1950-1990, Koorieweb, accessed from http://www.kooriweb.org/foley/resources/pdfs/229.pdf


Smith, B. 2008 Still under the Act? Subjectivity and the State in Aboriginal North Queensland. Oceania 78: 199-216.

Events and Submissions/Topic

Study guide

Lecture

Readings

Prepare summary of readings

Web search of Aboriginal language map Australia & National Native Title Tribunal

Natural Resource Management (Week 3) Begin Date: 22 Nov 2021

Module/Topic

Natural Resource Management

Chapter

Syme, G.J., B.E. Nancarrow and J.A. McCreddin 1999 Defining the components of fairness in the allocation of water to environmental and human uses. Journal of Environmental Management 57:51-70.


Australian Government 2017 Module to the National Water Initiative (NWI) Policy Guidelines for water planning and management: Engaging Indigenous Peoples in water planning and management.

Events and Submissions/Topic

Study guide

Lecture

Readings

Prepare summary of readings

Guest Lecture: TBA

Participatory planning (Week 4) Begin Date: 29 Nov 2021

Module/Topic

Participatory planning

Chapter

Freitas, R. 2016 Cultural mapping as a development tool. City, Culture and Society 7:9-16.


Jeanotte, S. 2016 Story-telling about place: Engaging citizens in cultural mapping. City, Culture and Society 7:35-71.

Events and Submissions/Topic

Study guide

Lecture

Readings

Prepare summary of readings


Group Discussion and Quiz Due: Week 4 Friday (3 Dec 2021) 11:45 pm AEST
Vacation Week Begin Date: 06 Dec 2021

Module/Topic

Chapter

Events and Submissions/Topic

Using quantitative data (Week 5) Begin Date: 13 Dec 2021

Module/Topic

Using quantitative data

Chapter

McGinty, S. (2012). Engaging Indigenous Knowledge(s) in research and practice. Journal of Language Studies 12(1): 5-15.


De Vaus, D. (2002).Finding a Sample. Surveys in social research. Fifth Edition, Allen & Unwin, Crows Nest, NSW: 69-93.

Events and Submissions/Topic

Study guide

Lecture

Readings

Prepare summary of readings



Case Study Due: Week 5 Friday (17 Dec 2021) 11:45 pm AEST
Using qualitative data (Week 6) Begin Date: 20 Dec 2021

Module/Topic

Using qualitative data

Chapter

Turner, D. W. (2010). Qualitative Interview Design: A Practical Guide for Novice Investigators. The Qualitative Report 15(3): 754-760.


Anguelovski, I. (2011). Understanding the Dynamics of Community Engagement of Corporations in Communities: The Iterative Relationship Between Dialogue Processes and Local Protest at the Tintaya Copper Mine in Peru. Society & Natural Resources: An International Journal 24(4): 384- 399.

Events and Submissions/Topic

Study guide

Lecture

Readings


Vacation Week Begin Date: 27 Dec 2021

Module/Topic

Chapter

Events and Submissions/Topic

Indigenous engagement and conflict resolution (Week 7) Begin Date: 03 Jan 2022

Module/Topic

Indigenous engagement and conflict resolution

Chapter

Bauman, T. (2007) ‘You mob all agree?’: the chronic emergency of culturally competent engaged Indigenous problem solving, Indigenous Law Bulletin 6 (29)


Web resource: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community histories at https://www.qld.gov.au/atsi/cultural-awareness-heritagearts/community-histories

Events and Submissions/Topic

Lecture

Readings

Prepare summary of readings

Case study: Working alongside Aboriginal custodians in the Wet Tropics (Week 8) Begin Date: 10 Jan 2022

Module/Topic

Case study: Working alongside Aboriginal custodians in the Wet Tropics

Chapter

Buhrich, A., S. McIntyre-Tamwoy and S. Greer 2019) Working alongside: Community archaeology in post-native title Australia. Transforming Heritage Practise in the 21st Century: Contributions from community archaeology. One World Archaeology Series.

Events and Submissions/Topic

Lecture

Reading

Case study: Indigenous engagement James Price Point (Week 9) Begin Date: 17 Jan 2022

Module/Topic

Case study: Indigenous engagement James Price Point

Chapter

Mitchell, N. and Anderson, J., 1980. Kubara. St. Lucia, Qld.:University of Queensland, Department of Anthropology and Sociology.

Events and Submissions/Topic

Readings

Interview Video

Lecture


Case study: Bush Heritage Australia (Week 10) Begin Date: 24 Jan 2022

Module/Topic

Case study: Bush Heritage Australia

Chapter

Conservation planning in a crosscultural context: the Wunambal Gaambera Healthy Country Project in the Kimberley, Western Australia.


Events and Submissions/Topic

Lecture

Video

Reading

Evaluating success in community engagement (Week 11) Begin Date: 31 Jan 2022

Module/Topic

Evaluating success in community engagement

Chapter

Sufian, M. et al (2011) Program Evaluation and Evaluating Community Engagement. In M. Silberberg, J. Cook, C. Drescher, D. McClosley, S. Weaver and L. Ziegahn (Eds) Principles of Community Engagement 2nd Ed, Department of Health and Human Services Publication, Washington.


Douglas Shire Council (2014) Community Engagement Guide and Tools, Douglas Shire Council Publication, Mossman, Queensland.

Events and Submissions/Topic

Study guide

Lecture

Readings

Course review (Week 12) Begin Date: 07 Feb 2022

Module/Topic

Course Review

Chapter

Community Planning Toolkit

Events and Submissions/Topic

Readings

Lecture


Stakeholder Engagement Plan Due: Week 12 Friday (11 Feb 2022) 11:45 pm AEST
Exam Week Begin Date: 14 Feb 2022

Module/Topic

Chapter

Events and Submissions/Topic

Assessment Tasks

1 Group Discussion

Assessment Title
Group Discussion and Quiz

Task Description

This is a two part assessment piece that will be graded Pass/Fail. 

Part 1:
A group discussion will be held during class time to facilitate conversation about terminology and highlight current challenges facing First Nation's peoples in Australia today. This group discussion will give you an opportunity to ask the questions you have never had a chance to ask before and help support you in completing your Case Study assessment piece. 
You must attend the group discussion live. Multiple discussion sessions will be held if required. Recordings will be made for review purposes. 

Part 2: 
You must complete Part 1 in order to be able to complete Part 2 of this assessment.
An online multiple choice and short answer quiz about First Nation terminologies, challenges and First Nations perspectives will be available on the Moodle site. This quiz include topics such as key indicators of First Nations disadvantage.


Assessment Due Date

Week 4 Friday (3 Dec 2021) 11:45 pm AEST


Return Date to Students

Week 5 Friday (17 Dec 2021)


Weighting
Pass/Fail

Assessment Criteria

You will be assessed on completeness and correctness of your answers to the questions in the online quiz. All quiz topics will be covered during the group discussion.  



Referencing Style

Submission
Online

Learning Outcomes Assessed
  • Discuss the importance of cultural and historical awareness of First Nations and community engagement within Australia and overseas
  • Identify the implications of top-down/bottom-up approaches to engagement in environmental and agricultural management
  • Critique the key issues that shape contemporary discourses of First Nations and community engagement

2 Case Study

Assessment Title
Case Study

Task Description

In this assessment piece, you will firstly chose the topic that you will examine for your final written assessment piece in this unit. A list of topics will be provided on the Moodle site during term. Alternatively, you may pick another topic subject to Unit Coordinator approval.

You will complete initial research into the topic, including, but not limited to (as relevant): 

  • Evidence of Native Title
  • Identification of stakeholders and priorities 
  • Location and background to the project and/or group
  • History of the area including original First Nations peoples
  • Principles and aims of your community engagement strategy (an outline of your written assessment)

The word limit for this assessment is 1000 words. 

Further detail will be provided on the Moodle site and in class throughout the term. 


Assessment Due Date

Week 5 Friday (17 Dec 2021) 11:45 pm AEST


Return Date to Students

Week 8 Friday (14 Jan 2022)


Weighting
40%

Minimum mark or grade
50%

Assessment Criteria

Marks for this assessment will be awarded as follows:

  • 20% Presentation - grammar, formatting, layout, word count, referencing.
  • 10% Introduction.
  • 50% Content that addresses the initial research topic requirements. 
  • 20% Discussion and conclusion.


Referencing Style

Submission
Online

Learning Outcomes Assessed
  • Discuss the importance of cultural and historical awareness of First Nations and community engagement within Australia and overseas
  • Identify the implications of top-down/bottom-up approaches to engagement in environmental and agricultural management

3 Written Assessment

Assessment Title
Stakeholder Engagement Plan

Task Description

Your final written assessment is a Stakeholder Engagement Plan that will incorporate details you have learned throughout term.

The word limit for your Stakeholder Engagement Plan is 2000 (+/- 10%) words.

Format: Write a report using the format below. The format can be adapted as needed as long as it contains the essential components.


Essential Components:

1. Title page: title, your name, unit name, date

2. Table of contents

3. Introduction: Include the principles and aims of your strategy, definitions, benefits and risks to this project.

4. Detail that you included in your Case Study assessment piece (you will need to make updates to this information for this assessment piece).

5. Strategies for engaging stakeholders

6. Discussion and conclusion

7. References

8. Appendices (if required)


Further detail will be provided on the Moodle site and in class throughout the term. 


Assessment Due Date

Week 12 Friday (11 Feb 2022) 11:45 pm AEST


Return Date to Students

After Certification of Grades.


Weighting
60%

Minimum mark or grade
50%

Assessment Criteria

Marks for this assessment will be awarded as follows:

  • 20% Presentation - grammar, formatting, layout, word count, referencing.
  • 10% Introduction - includes the principles and aims of your Engagement Strategy, definitions, benefits and risks to this project.
  • 20% Background and Stakeholders - Location of proposed project, who are the key stakeholders, is there a priority of stakeholders.
  • 30% Recommended strategies - these can be quantitative, qualitative or a combination of both. They should be based on your readings, lectures and study guide.
  • 20% Discussion and conclusion.


Referencing Style

Submission
Online

Learning Outcomes Assessed
  • Discuss the importance of cultural and historical awareness of First Nations and community engagement within Australia and overseas
  • Identify the implications of top-down/bottom-up approaches to engagement in environmental and agricultural management
  • Develop basic First Nations and community engagement plans based on adaptive management principles
  • Prepare an engagement section of an environmental and agricultural management planning report
  • Critique the key issues that shape contemporary discourses of First Nations and community engagement

Academic Integrity Statement

As a CQUniversity student you are expected to act honestly in all aspects of your academic work.

Any assessable work undertaken or submitted for review or assessment must be your own work. Assessable work is any type of work you do to meet the assessment requirements in the unit, including draft work submitted for review and feedback and final work to be assessed.

When you use the ideas, words or data of others in your assessment, you must thoroughly and clearly acknowledge the source of this information by using the correct referencing style for your unit. Using others’ work without proper acknowledgement may be considered a form of intellectual dishonesty.

Participating honestly, respectfully, responsibly, and fairly in your university study ensures the CQUniversity qualification you earn will be valued as a true indication of your individual academic achievement and will continue to receive the respect and recognition it deserves.

As a student, you are responsible for reading and following CQUniversity’s policies, including the Student Academic Integrity Policy and Procedure. This policy sets out CQUniversity’s expectations of you to act with integrity, examples of academic integrity breaches to avoid, the processes used to address alleged breaches of academic integrity, and potential penalties.

What is a breach of academic integrity?

A breach of academic integrity includes but is not limited to plagiarism, self-plagiarism, collusion, cheating, contract cheating, and academic misconduct. The Student Academic Integrity Policy and Procedure defines what these terms mean and gives examples.

Why is academic integrity important?

A breach of academic integrity may result in one or more penalties, including suspension or even expulsion from the University. It can also have negative implications for student visas and future enrolment at CQUniversity or elsewhere. Students who engage in contract cheating also risk being blackmailed by contract cheating services.

Where can I get assistance?

For academic advice and guidance, the Academic Learning Centre (ALC) can support you in becoming confident in completing assessments with integrity and of high standard.

What can you do to act with integrity?