CQUniversity Unit Profile
ENEX13004 Advanced Dynamics and Robotics
Advanced Dynamics and Robotics
All details in this unit profile for ENEX13004 have been officially approved by CQUniversity and represent a learning partnership between the University and you (our student).
The information will not be changed unless absolutely necessary and any change will be clearly indicated by an approved correction included in the profile.
General Information

Overview

This unit will introduce you to advanced dynamics and robotics. You will learn the principle of operation of robotic manipulators, mobile robots, robotic vision systems, forward kinematics and inverse kinematics of robotic manipulators, robot dynamics and control, and programing robots using industry standard software. You will be able to program industrial robots, mobile robots and humanoid robots for a given task. You will also be able to mathematically model robotic manipulators, plan their link and joint trajectories, predict and avoid collision with objects in surrounding environment by fusing information from various sensors attached to the robotic device. Students enrolled in distance mode are required to attend a compulsory Residential School.

Details

Career Level: Undergraduate
Unit Level: Level 3
Credit Points: 6
Student Contribution Band: 8
Fraction of Full-Time Student Load: 0.125

Pre-requisites or Co-requisites

Prerequisites: ENEM12010 Engineering Dynamics AND MATH12222 Advanced Mathematical Applications AND ENEE12016 Signals and Systems

Important note: Students enrolled in a subsequent unit who failed their pre-requisite unit, should drop the subsequent unit before the census date or within 10 working days of Fail grade notification. Students who do not drop the unit in this timeframe cannot later drop the unit without academic and financial liability. See details in the Assessment Policy and Procedure (Higher Education Coursework).

Offerings For Term 1 - 2021

Mackay
Mixed Mode

Attendance Requirements

All on-campus students are expected to attend scheduled classes – in some units, these classes are identified as a mandatory (pass/fail) component and attendance is compulsory. International students, on a student visa, must maintain a full time study load and meet both attendance and academic progress requirements in each study period (satisfactory attendance for International students is defined as maintaining at least an 80% attendance record).

Residential Schools

This unit has a Compulsory Residential School for distance mode students and the details are:
Click here to see your Residential School Timetable.

Class and Assessment Overview

Recommended Student Time Commitment

Each 6-credit Undergraduate unit at CQUniversity requires an overall time commitment of an average of 12.5 hours of study per week, making a total of 150 hours for the unit.

Class Timetable

Bundaberg, Cairns, Emerald, Gladstone, Mackay, Rockhampton, Townsville
Adelaide, Brisbane, Melbourne, Perth, Sydney

Assessment Overview

1. Written Assessment
Weighting: 20%
2. Written Assessment
Weighting: 20%
3. Practical and Written Assessment
Weighting: 20%
4. Portfolio
Weighting: 40%

Assessment Grading

This is a graded unit: your overall grade will be calculated from the marks or grades for each assessment task, based on the relative weightings shown in the table above. You must obtain an overall mark for the unit of at least 50%, or an overall grade of ‘pass’ in order to pass the unit. If any ‘pass/fail’ tasks are shown in the table above they must also be completed successfully (‘pass’ grade). You must also meet any minimum mark requirements specified for a particular assessment task, as detailed in the ‘assessment task’ section (note that in some instances, the minimum mark for a task may be greater than 50%). Consult the University’s Grades and Results Policy for more details of interim results and final grades.

Previous Student Feedback

Feedback, Recommendations and Responses

Every unit is reviewed for enhancement each year. At the most recent review, the following staff and student feedback items were identified and recommendations were made.

Feedback from 'Have Your Say' feedback

Feedback

The practicals with robots are interesting

Recommendation

The practicals will be based on robots.

Feedback from 'Have Your Say' feedback

Feedback

More detailed documentation on MATLAB toolbox relevant to robot programming will be helpful.

Recommendation

More material on MATLAB toolbox on robot programming will be provided.

Feedback from 'Have Your Say' feedback

Feedback

Further help on how to use ROS would be beneficial.

Recommendation

More help on ROS will be provided.

Unit Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this unit, you will be able to:
  1. Describe rigid body and multi-link motion dynamics, and coordinate system transformation
  2. Apply knowledge of dynamics to analyse robotic systems including robotic manipulators and predict their trajectories
  3. Develop mathematical models for robotic systems
  4. Program industrial robots using industry standard programming software
  5. Predict robot trajectories using multi sensor data fusion techniques
  6. Solve real life problems and communicate professionally using robotic engineering terminology, symbols and diagrams that conform to Australian and international standards
  7. Work individually and collaboratively in teams, communicate professionally in presenting your solutions

Learning outcomes are linked to Engineers Australia Stage 1 Competencies and also discipline capabilities. You can find the mapping for this on the Engineering Undergraduate Course website.

Alignment of Learning Outcomes, Assessment and Graduate Attributes
N/A Level
Introductory Level
Intermediate Level
Graduate Level
Professional Level
Advanced Level

Alignment of Assessment Tasks to Learning Outcomes

Assessment Tasks Learning Outcomes
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
1 - Written Assessment - 20%
2 - Written Assessment - 20%
3 - Practical and Written Assessment - 20%
4 - Portfolio - 40%

Alignment of Graduate Attributes to Learning Outcomes

Graduate Attributes Learning Outcomes
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
1 - Communication
2 - Problem Solving
3 - Critical Thinking
4 - Information Literacy
5 - Team Work
6 - Information Technology Competence
7 - Cross Cultural Competence
8 - Ethical practice
9 - Social Innovation

Alignment of Assessment Tasks to Graduate Attributes

Assessment Tasks Graduate Attributes
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
1 - Written Assessment - 20%
2 - Written Assessment - 20%
3 - Practical and Written Assessment - 20%
4 - Portfolio - 40%
Textbooks and Resources

Textbooks

Prescribed

Robotics, Vision and Control (2017)

Authors: Peter Corke
Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg
ISBN: 978-3-642-20144-8
Binding: eBook

Additional Textbook Information

In this unit, we will be using materials from different resources to learn and practice the important aspects of robotics. The prescribed textbook would be your main resource but not all the chapters will be covered in the unit.

This prescribed ebook can be downloaded free from the following link

https://link.springer.com/book/10.1007/978-3-642-20144-8

IT Resources

You will need access to the following IT resources:
  • CQUniversity Student Email
  • Internet
  • Unit Website (Moodle)
  • A computer with suitable hardware resources ( 8GB Memory, Intel core i5 and above CPU, Dedicated GPU is desired) and Windows(7 or later) with admin rights to install Virtual Box software.
Referencing Style

All submissions for this unit must use the referencing style: Harvard (author-date)

For further information, see the Assessment Tasks.

Teaching Contacts
Lasi Piyathilaka Unit Coordinator
l.piyathilaka@cqu.edu.au
Schedule
Week 1 Begin Date: 08 Mar 2021

Module/Topic

Introduction
  • Introduction to Robotics
  • Robotic Software Installation
  • Linux Basics
  • Introduction to Robotic Operating System (ROS)

Chapter

  • Chapter 1 (Robotic Vision and Control by Peter Corke)
  • Moodle Week 1 Learning Resources

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 2 Begin Date: 15 Mar 2021

Module/Topic

Representing Position and Orientation
  • Robot Spatial Descriptions and Transformations 
  • Robotic Simulation Environments
  • ROS Programming with Python
  • Robotic Coordinate Transformation 

Chapter

  • Chapter 2 (Robotic Vision and Control by Peter Corke)
  • Moodle Week 2 Learning Resources

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 3 Begin Date: 22 Mar 2021

Module/Topic

Robotic Manipulators
  • Robotic  Manipulator Modeling
  • Forward Kinematics
  • Robotic Arm Simulation

Chapter

  • Chapter 7.1  (Robotic Vision and Control by Peter Corke)
  • Moodle Week 3 Learning Resources

Events and Submissions/Topic

Team formation for the robotic competition 

Week 4 Begin Date: 29 Mar 2021

Module/Topic

Motion Planning
  •  Inverse Kinematics (IK) of Robotic Manipulators
  •  Programming with Inverse Kinematic Solvers
  •  Manipulator Motion Planning

Chapter

  • Chapter 7.2 (Robotic Vision and Control by Peter Corke)
  • Moodle Week 4 Learning Resources

Events and Submissions/Topic

Written and coding Assessment 1 Due: Week 4 Friday (2 Apr 2021) 11:45 pm AEST
Week 5 Begin Date: 05 Apr 2021

Module/Topic

Robotic Dynamics

  • Rigid Body Dynamics
  • Dynamic Modelling
  • Feedback Control

Chapter

  • Chapter 9  (Robotic Vision and Control by Peter Corke)
  • Moodle Week 5 Learning Resources

Events and Submissions/Topic

Vacation Week Begin Date: 12 Apr 2021

Module/Topic

Chapter

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 6 Begin Date: 19 Apr 2021

Module/Topic

Mobile Robots

  • Modelling
  • Kinematics

Chapter

  • Chapter 4 (Robotic Vision and Control by Peter Corke)
  • Moodle Week 6 Learning Resources

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 7 Begin Date: 26 Apr 2021

Module/Topic

Robotic Perception

  • Robotic Sensors
  • Image processing

Chapter

  • Chapter 10-12 (Robotic Vision and Control by Peter Corke)
  • Moodle Week 7 Learning Resources

Events and Submissions/Topic

Written and Coding Assessment 2 Due: Week 7 Friday (30 Apr 2021) 11:45 pm AEST
Week 8 Begin Date: 03 May 2021

Module/Topic

Robotic Localisation

  • Map building
  • Localisation algorithms

Chapter

  • Chapter 6 (Robotic Vision and Control by Peter Corke)
  • Moodle Week 8 Learning Resources

Events and Submissions/Topic

Submit project methodology and code flowcharts with the role of each team member

Week 9 Begin Date: 10 May 2021

Module/Topic

Robotic  Navigation

  • Path planning algorithms
  • Global Planner
  • Local Planner

Chapter

  • Chapter 5 (Robotic Vision and Control by Peter Corke)
  • Moodle Week 9 Learning Resources

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 10 Begin Date: 17 May 2021

Module/Topic

Lab exercises 

Chapter



Events and Submissions/Topic

Residential School


Practical and Written assessment - Labs Due: Week 10 Friday (21 May 2021) 11:59 pm AEST
Week 11 Begin Date: 24 May 2021

Module/Topic

Project Help

Chapter



Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 12 Begin Date: 31 May 2021

Module/Topic

Robotic Competion

Chapter

Events and Submissions/Topic

Robotic Competition and Project Demonstration

Wednesday 9.00 AM, 2/06/2021

Review/Exam Week Begin Date: 07 Jun 2021

Module/Topic

Chapter

Events and Submissions/Topic

Exam Week Begin Date: 14 Jun 2021

Module/Topic

Chapter

Events and Submissions/Topic

Portfolio Due: Exam Week Monday (14 Jun 2021) 11:45 pm AEST
Term Specific Information

The compulsory residential school will be held on week 10 at Mackay campus

Assessment Tasks

1 Written Assessment

Assessment Title
Written and coding Assessment 1

Task Description

This assessment will consist of problems with software implementation using the Robotic Operating System (ROS) and Python programming language. The students are expected to learn the basics of Python programming language and ROS framework in the first 2 weeks of the course. Interactive software tutorials will be provided using ROS to get hands-on experience, and the assessment items will be extensions of tutorials. Therefore, the students are required to complete interactive tutorials before attempting the assessment items. The assessment questions and criteria will be available on the Moodle course page. This assessment will test the students' understanding of the coordinate system transformation, mathematical modelling of robotic manipulators and trajectory generation. The students are required to showcase their understanding by developing robotic models in ROS simulation environments and trajectory generation using the Python programming language. The final submission must include the scripts, the simulation outputs and the report. The report must include explanations for code outputs and simulation results.


Assessment Due Date

Week 4 Friday (2 Apr 2021) 11:45 pm AEST


Return Date to Students

Week 6 Friday (23 Apr 2021)

Two weeks from submission


Weighting
20%

Minimum mark or grade
30%

Assessment Criteria

1. Computer codes are properly commented and relevant coding practices are used

2. Developed mathematical models are  accurate and output expected results

3. Computer code should not have any compilation errors

4. Software code output should match  with the report and simulation results included in the submission

5. All working and assumptions must be shown 


Referencing Style

Submission
Online

Submission Instructions
One zip folder with the report, codes and simulation outputs. The software code needs to uploaded to the code repository.

Learning Outcomes Assessed
  • Describe rigid body and multi-link motion dynamics, and coordinate system transformation
  • Apply knowledge of dynamics to analyse robotic systems including robotic manipulators and predict their trajectories
  • Develop mathematical models for robotic systems


Graduate Attributes
  • Communication
  • Problem Solving
  • Critical Thinking
  • Information Technology Competence

2 Written Assessment

Assessment Title
Written and Coding Assessment 2

Task Description

This assessment will test students' understanding of inverse kinematics and robotic dynamics. The students are required to develop mathematical models for multi-link robotic manipulators and to develop simulation models in the Robotic Operating System (ROS) framework. The understanding of advanced ROS concepts will be needed for the successful completion of this assignment. The weekly interactive tutorials will cover these topics and the code skeleton for this assignment will be provided. The students are expected to prepare a report that includes code outputs, explanations and simulation results. The final submission must include the scripts, the simulation outputs and the report with the submission.


Assessment Due Date

Week 7 Friday (30 Apr 2021) 11:45 pm AEST


Return Date to Students

Week 9 Friday (14 May 2021)

Two weeks from submission


Weighting
20%

Minimum mark or grade
30%

Assessment Criteria

1. Computer codes are properly commented and relevant coding practices are used

2. Developed mathematical models are accurate and output expected results

3. Computer code should not have any compilation errors

4. Software code output should match with the report and simulation results included in the submission

5. All working and assumptions must be shown


Referencing Style

Submission
Online

Submission Instructions
One zip folder with the report, codes and simulation outputs. The software code needs to uploaded to the code repository.

Learning Outcomes Assessed
  • Describe rigid body and multi-link motion dynamics, and coordinate system transformation
  • Apply knowledge of dynamics to analyse robotic systems including robotic manipulators and predict their trajectories
  • Develop mathematical models for robotic systems


Graduate Attributes
  • Communication
  • Problem Solving
  • Critical Thinking
  • Information Technology Competence

3 Practical and Written Assessment

Assessment Title
Practical and Written assessment - Labs

Task Description

This assessment covers computer lab sessions and practicals with robots and is distributed in four lab assessments (labs 1 to 4). You are required to use specific software and simulation environment to complete each lab. Most of the labs can be run on the simulation environment. However, you need to attend the mandatory lab sessions that require robot interaction. The simulation work for labs needs to completed by week 9.

The details of these labs/practicals will be available from the unit Moodle website. The lab and practicals are compulsory (you need to pass these to pass the unit). Mixed-mode students complete the labs at the compulsory residential school. The lab reports have to be submitted individually and no team report will be accepted.


Assessment Due Date

Week 10 Friday (21 May 2021) 11:59 pm AEST


Return Date to Students

Week 12 Friday (4 Jun 2021)

Two weeks after each submission


Weighting
20%

Minimum mark or grade
Combined marks of Labs 1 to 4 need to be 50% or more to pass the unit.

Assessment Criteria

  1. Correct answers including plots and figures
  2. Readability and flow of the code (should be neat, tidy, and legible)
  3. Computer codes should be properly commented and formatted
  4. Computer code should not have any compilation errors
  5. Software code output should match with the report and simulation results included in the submission
  6. All working and assumptions must be shown


Referencing Style

Submission
Online

Submission Instructions
One folder including pdf (solutions, any handwritten data, code, and its output) and simulation outputs.

Learning Outcomes Assessed
  • Program industrial robots using industry standard programming software
  • Predict robot trajectories using multi sensor data fusion techniques
  • Solve real life problems and communicate professionally using robotic engineering terminology, symbols and diagrams that conform to Australian and international standards
  • Work individually and collaboratively in teams, communicate professionally in presenting your solutions


Graduate Attributes
  • Communication
  • Problem Solving
  • Critical Thinking
  • Team Work
  • Information Technology Competence
  • Cross Cultural Competence
  • Ethical practice

4 Portfolio

Assessment Title
Portfolio

Task Description

The portfolio assessment in this unit corresponds mainly to the project and its report. The students are allowed to work in groups of 2 (3 if necessary). This project will run as a robotic completion and will be task-based. Each student group needs to program robotics platforms to complete each task and points will be given for successful completion. The students are expected to start their group project work from week 4 and the final competition will be held on week 12. The portfolio needs to be individually submitted highlighting the individual's contribution (one portfolio per group is not allowed). The Project output needs to be demonstrated either in the simulation environment or using actual robots. The final codebase needs to be submitted to the assigned code repository. Peer evaluation will be done to identify the individual contribution of each member of the project.


Assessment Due Date

Exam Week Monday (14 Jun 2021) 11:45 pm AEST

The portfolio due in the exam Week. Robotic Competition will be held on week 12


Return Date to Students

This is the final assessment item and marks/feedback will be released after the grades are released.


Weighting
40%

Minimum mark or grade
50%

Assessment Criteria

1. Number of tasks completed in the robotic competition

2. The individual contribution to the group project

3. Corporation with other team members

4. Team role fulfilment

3. Computer codes are properly commented and relevant coding practices are used

The project report should at least contain the following:

1. You will document all the assumptions, design details, code files, and results in the project report.

2. The report/portfolio should clearly indicate the individual work and contribution in the team project and also include the common report for the group.


Referencing Style

Submission
Online

Submission Instructions
One folder containing pdf report (common and individual contribution) and software code with any other video file / output file

Learning Outcomes Assessed
  • Describe rigid body and multi-link motion dynamics, and coordinate system transformation
  • Apply knowledge of dynamics to analyse robotic systems including robotic manipulators and predict their trajectories
  • Develop mathematical models for robotic systems
  • Program industrial robots using industry standard programming software
  • Predict robot trajectories using multi sensor data fusion techniques
  • Solve real life problems and communicate professionally using robotic engineering terminology, symbols and diagrams that conform to Australian and international standards
  • Work individually and collaboratively in teams, communicate professionally in presenting your solutions


Graduate Attributes
  • Communication
  • Problem Solving
  • Critical Thinking
  • Team Work
  • Information Technology Competence
  • Cross Cultural Competence
  • Ethical practice

Academic Integrity Statement

As a CQUniversity student you are expected to act honestly in all aspects of your academic work.

Any assessable work undertaken or submitted for review or assessment must be your own work. Assessable work is any type of work you do to meet the assessment requirements in the unit, including draft work submitted for review and feedback and final work to be assessed.

When you use the ideas, words or data of others in your assessment, you must thoroughly and clearly acknowledge the source of this information by using the correct referencing style for your unit. Using others’ work without proper acknowledgement may be considered a form of intellectual dishonesty.

Participating honestly, respectfully, responsibly, and fairly in your university study ensures the CQUniversity qualification you earn will be valued as a true indication of your individual academic achievement and will continue to receive the respect and recognition it deserves.

As a student, you are responsible for reading and following CQUniversity’s policies, including the Student Academic Integrity Policy and Procedure. This policy sets out CQUniversity’s expectations of you to act with integrity, examples of academic integrity breaches to avoid, the processes used to address alleged breaches of academic integrity, and potential penalties.

What is a breach of academic integrity?

A breach of academic integrity includes but is not limited to plagiarism, self-plagiarism, collusion, cheating, contract cheating, and academic misconduct. The Student Academic Integrity Policy and Procedure defines what these terms mean and gives examples.

Why is academic integrity important?

A breach of academic integrity may result in one or more penalties, including suspension or even expulsion from the University. It can also have negative implications for student visas and future enrolment at CQUniversity or elsewhere. Students who engage in contract cheating also risk being blackmailed by contract cheating services.

Where can I get assistance?

For academic advice and guidance, the Academic Learning Centre (ALC) can support you in becoming confident in completing assessments with integrity and of high standard.

What can you do to act with integrity?