CQUniversity Unit Profile
JOUR11005 Introduction to Journalism
Introduction to Journalism
All details in this unit profile for JOUR11005 have been officially approved by CQUniversity and represent a learning partnership between the University and you (our student).
The information will not be changed unless absolutely necessary and any change will be clearly indicated by an approved correction included in the profile.
General Information

Overview

This unit will introduce you to historical, social and political contexts of journalistic practice. Topics covered include the history of ‘journalism’ in western and eastern cultures, a number of different genres of journalism, journalism as an institution, and media ethics. You will also consider the future of journalism and reflect on examples of best (and worst) practice as part of the unit.

Details

Career Level: Undergraduate
Unit Level: Level 1
Credit Points: 6
Student Contribution Band: 10
Fraction of Full-Time Student Load: 0.125

Pre-requisites or Co-requisites

There are no requisites for this unit.

Important note: Students enrolled in a subsequent unit who failed their pre-requisite unit, should drop the subsequent unit before the census date or within 10 working days of Fail grade notification. Students who do not drop the unit in this timeframe cannot later drop the unit without academic and financial liability. See details in the Assessment Policy and Procedure (Higher Education Coursework).

Offerings For Term 1 - 2017

Brisbane
Cairns
Distance
Mackay
Rockhampton
Townsville

Attendance Requirements

All on-campus students are expected to attend scheduled classes – in some units, these classes are identified as a mandatory (pass/fail) component and attendance is compulsory. International students, on a student visa, must maintain a full time study load and meet both attendance and academic progress requirements in each study period (satisfactory attendance for International students is defined as maintaining at least an 80% attendance record).

Class and Assessment Overview

Recommended Student Time Commitment

Each 6-credit Undergraduate unit at CQUniversity requires an overall time commitment of an average of 12.5 hours of study per week, making a total of 150 hours for the unit.

Class Timetable

Bundaberg, Cairns, Emerald, Gladstone, Mackay, Rockhampton, Townsville
Adelaide, Brisbane, Melbourne, Perth, Sydney

Assessment Overview

1. Written Assessment
Weighting: 50%
2. Group Discussion
Weighting: 50%

Assessment Grading

This is a graded unit: your overall grade will be calculated from the marks or grades for each assessment task, based on the relative weightings shown in the table above. You must obtain an overall mark for the unit of at least 50%, or an overall grade of ‘pass’ in order to pass the unit. If any ‘pass/fail’ tasks are shown in the table above they must also be completed successfully (‘pass’ grade). You must also meet any minimum mark requirements specified for a particular assessment task, as detailed in the ‘assessment task’ section (note that in some instances, the minimum mark for a task may be greater than 50%). Consult the University’s Grades and Results Policy for more details of interim results and final grades.

Previous Student Feedback

Feedback, Recommendations and Responses

Every unit is reviewed for enhancement each year. At the most recent review, the following staff and student feedback items were identified and recommendations were made.

Feedback from Student unit satisfaction survey "Have your say".

Feedback

Lecturer engagement was excellent.

Recommendation

Unit coordinator and lecturers to continue engaging with students at a personal and individualised level.

Feedback from Student unit satisfaction survey "Have your say".

Feedback

Students loved the unit design because it allowed for both engagement and interaction.

Recommendation

Continue unit design with discovery project and news analysis.

Feedback from Unit Coordinator

Feedback

Some journalists in the Discovery Project were not chosen by students.

Recommendation

Reduce the number of journalists to be selected for the group component of the assessment, and extend the due date to allow more time for presentation to be completed.

Unit Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this unit, you will be able to:
  1. Discuss the social and historical development of journalism from a range of cultural perspectives
  2. Explain differences between journalism genres and the way in which genre influences journalistic practice
  3. Critique and discuss issues relevant to journalistic practice in a contemporary media environment

n/a

Alignment of Learning Outcomes, Assessment and Graduate Attributes
N/A Level
Introductory Level
Intermediate Level
Graduate Level
Professional Level
Advanced Level

Alignment of Assessment Tasks to Learning Outcomes

Assessment Tasks Learning Outcomes
1 2 3
1 - Written Assessment - 50%
2 - Group Discussion - 50%

Alignment of Graduate Attributes to Learning Outcomes

Graduate Attributes Learning Outcomes
1 2 3
1 - Communication
2 - Problem Solving
3 - Critical Thinking
4 - Information Literacy
5 - Team Work
6 - Information Technology Competence
7 - Cross Cultural Competence
8 - Ethical practice
9 - Social Innovation

Alignment of Assessment Tasks to Graduate Attributes

Assessment Tasks Graduate Attributes
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
1 - Written Assessment - 50%
2 - Group Discussion - 50%
Textbooks and Resources

Textbooks

Prescribed

Media and Journalism: New Approaches to Theory and Practice 3rd (2015)

Authors: Bainbridge, J., Goc, N., and Tynan, E.
Oxford University Press
South Melbourne South Melbourne , Victoria , Australia
ISBN: 9780195588019
Binding: Paperback

Additional Textbook Information

Please note: The prescribed text is the third edition. The second edition (2011) may still be used, although some information may be dated, and page numbers referred to in the lesson guides on Moodle will be incorrect for the second edition.

IT Resources

You will need access to the following IT resources:
  • CQUniversity Student Email
  • Internet
  • Unit Website (Moodle)
Referencing Style

All submissions for this unit must use the referencing style: American Psychological Association 6th Edition (APA 6th edition)

For further information, see the Assessment Tasks.

Teaching Contacts
Celeste Lawson Unit Coordinator
c.lawson@cqu.edu.au
Schedule
Week 1 Begin Date: 06 Mar 2017

Module/Topic

Module 1 Journalism as a Profession

Chapter

Introduction

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 2 Begin Date: 13 Mar 2017

Module/Topic

Module 1 Journalism as a Profession

Chapter

Chapter 3

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 3 Begin Date: 20 Mar 2017

Module/Topic

Module 2 Journalism Law and Ethics

Chapter

Chapters 17, 18

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 4 Begin Date: 27 Mar 2017

Module/Topic

Module 2 Journalism Law and Ethics

Chapter

Chapters 17, 18

Events and Submissions/Topic

Group Discussion

Week 5 Begin Date: 03 Apr 2017

Module/Topic

Module 3 Journalism Genres

Chapter

Chapters 12, 14

Events and Submissions/Topic

Group Discussion

Vacation Week Begin Date: 10 Apr 2017

Module/Topic

Chapter

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 6 Begin Date: 17 Apr 2017

Module/Topic

Module 3 Journalism Genres

Chapter

Chapters 14, 16

Events and Submissions/Topic

Group Discussion

Week 7 Begin Date: 24 Apr 2017

Module/Topic

Module 4 New Media

Chapter

Chapter 4, 19

Events and Submissions/Topic

Group Discussion


News analysis (essay) Due: Week 7 Monday (24 Apr 2017) 4:00 pm AEST
Week 8 Begin Date: 01 May 2017

Module/Topic

Module 4 New Media

Chapter

Chapter 4, 19

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 9 Begin Date: 08 May 2017

Module/Topic

Module 5 Press Freedom in Western society

Chapter

Chapter 2, Case Study 1, 4 and 5

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 10 Begin Date: 15 May 2017

Module/Topic

Module 5 Press Freedom in Western society

Chapter

Chapter 2, Case Study 1, 4 and 5

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 11 Begin Date: 22 May 2017

Module/Topic

Module 6 Journalism in non-Western countries

Chapter

Chapter 12

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 12 Begin Date: 29 May 2017

Module/Topic

Module 6 Journalism in non-Western countries

Chapter

Chapter 12

Events and Submissions/Topic

Review/Exam Week Begin Date: 05 Jun 2017

Module/Topic

Chapter

Events and Submissions/Topic

Discovery Project Due: Review/Exam Week Tuesday (6 June 2017) 9:00 am AEST
Exam Week Begin Date: 12 Jun 2017

Module/Topic

Chapter

Events and Submissions/Topic

Assessment Tasks

1 Written Assessment

Assessment Title
News analysis (essay)

Task Description

This task requires you to analyse news in order to compare genres and approaches to journalistic practice.

You should select and analyse three (3) contemporary news stories (published in the last month), including:

  • One (1) Sports news story AND
  • One (1) Police or Court news story AND
  • One (1) Political news story.

At least one (1) of these three stories should be of extended length (more than1000 words), either a feature item, investigative piece, media interview or current affairs segment.

You will need to submit copies of the three (3) news stories you have chosen as appendices to your essay. These appendices can be scanned copies of print articles, transcripts (if the story was broadcast), or a 'cut and paste' of an online article. The appendices of the news stories need to be in such a form that teaching staff can refer to the original material. You should also include the details of the news stories as references in your essay's Reference list.

When analysing your three (3) news stories, either in print, broadcast or online in the local or state media, refer to and address the questions listed below:

1. In terms of 'who, what, why, when, where, and how', what is being reported?

2. Is the story based on an issue (something ongoing) or an event (something specific that happened)?

3. What are the dominant news values in each of the news stories?

4. Does each story follow the standard reporting elements of who, what, when, where, how and why? If not, what other elements are present?

5. Compare and contrast the three (3) stories, paying particular attention to sources (those quoted/facts and figures), personalities/identities (names featured, but not necessarily quoted), and conclusions (angle, or the way the story is framed).

6. What are the differences in the way the stories are written and presented? Account for differences in style, format and presentation.

7. Discuss the significance of the three (3) stories in terms of their prominence and placement in the media outlet you have chosen (eg. Which section? Was the story front page? Was it the top link? Was it the most prominent sports story?)

8. What do the prominence and presentation of the three (3) stories tell you about the readership or audience of the local or state outlets in which they appear?

You are expected to reference your discussion. The word count is 1,500 words.


Assessment Due Date

Week 7 Monday (24 Apr 2017) 4:00 pm AEST


Return Date to Students

Marked assessments will be returned two weeks after submission.


Weighting
50%

Assessment Criteria

A detailed marking criteria is available on the Moodle website.

Elements assessed include:

  • Quality of news stories chosen
  • Accuracy of referencing
  • Standard of presentation including expression
  • Relevance to course concepts and textbook
  • Depth of analysis (rather than description)
  • Argumentation and appropriate use of examples
  • Appropriate introduction and conclusion


Referencing Style

Submission
Online

Learning Outcomes Assessed
  • Discuss the social and historical development of journalism from a range of cultural perspectives
  • Explain differences between journalism genres and the way in which genre influences journalistic practice
  • Critique and discuss issues relevant to journalistic practice in a contemporary media environment


Graduate Attributes
  • Communication
  • Critical Thinking
  • Information Literacy
  • Information Technology Competence
  • Ethical practice

2 Group Discussion

Assessment Title
Discovery Project

Task Description

There are two parts to this assessment: 1) Presentation and discussion (Team) AND 2) Written submission (Individual).

1) Presentation and discussion (25%) (Team): This assessment requires students to review the work of TWO journalists and present findings on that journalist to class peers.

On-campus students will choose teams in your class in Weeks 1/2, and distance students will nominate your journalists online no later than Week 2 (Teams for distance students will comprise students who have chosen the same journalist - to a maximum of four students per team). You need not be in the same team for both presentations.

Each team must support your presentation with a slide presentation. Your final slide will include references. All photographs used within the presentation must also be referenced. On-campus students will present this in class; distance students will submit their presentation to the relevant forum with embedded voice-over (maximum of 10 minutes). Guidance about creating effective presentations will be provided on the course website.

Ideally you will work in teams for this task, but if you have extenuating circumstances, you may discuss the possibility of individual work with the Unit Coordinator. You will also be required to contribute to discussions about each journalist, and this discussion will be guided by teaching staff during class/on the forum.

You will need to choose TWO journalists from the following list. The assessment will be due in the week the journalist is discussed. (For example, the presentation about Lee Lin Chin will be due in Week 4 and Peter Greste in Week 7.)


Week 4 - Lee Lin Chin (Australia)
Week 5 - Helen Thomas (USA)
Week 6 - Gao Yu (China)
Week 7 - Peter Greste (Australia)


The following questions will help guide your research/structure for your presentations:

  1. Provide a summary of this person's work - for example, you can provide examples of writing or broadcasts with a summary of contents and context, or you might summarise a body of work over a particular time frame.
  2. Is this person a 'real' journalist? Justify your response against a definition of journalism (supported by reference).
  3. How does the journalist's work reflect journalism as 'The Fourth Estate' (if it does)?
  4. What genre of journalism was/is the journalist most renowned for in their work?
  5. What is the journalist's most significant contribution to public knowledge or interest?
  6. Did/Does this journalist practice ethically and lawfully? If not, how not? If so, what is the evidence for this and were there any consequences?
  7. What are the limitations/shortcomings (if any) associated with this journalist?
  8. What do you personally like the most about this journalist's work, and why?
  9. What do you personally dislike about this journalist's work, and why?
  10. What did you learn about the journalist that might influence your approach to journalism as a profession, and why?

This is an introductory level task, and aims to: encourage you to meet and work with fellow students even if you're working by distance; introduce you to key concepts in journalism through practice; introduce you to research and presentation. It is supposed to be enjoyable. You are allowed to have fun.

All students working in a team will conduct a self and peer assessment, whereby each team member will evaluate the performance of themselves, and their peers. Details about how to conduct a self and peer assessment will be provided. This process does not influence your grade unless it is clear that there is an issue, in which case teaching staff will talk to you. We know many students don't like to work in teams for a range of reasons, but our experience is also that learning to work effectively in teams comes from experience, a bit of training and support.

All members of a team will receive the same mark for the presentation component of this assessment, but all students will receive an individual grade for contribution and participation in discussion.

2) Written submission (Individual) (25%): All students will submit an individual written report that ranks (in their opinion) ten (10) journalists in order, with number 1 being 'Journalist of the Century' on Tuesday, Review Week. This should be 2000 - 2500 words. You must discuss each of the four journalists from Part 1, plus an additional six (6) journalists of your choice. A list of suggested journalists will be provided, but you can choose anyone who fulfils the definition of "journalist". Choose wisely, and include international as well as Australian journalists. They need not be practicing as a journalist now (and they need not be alive.) You will draw upon the things you have learned during the term in your presentation and discussions, and each journalist should have a paragraph summary, followed by a sentence as to why you ranked them in the order you have. An example will be posted on Moodle. Referencing is required, and does not count towards the word count. You will need at least two sources per journalist.


Assessment Due Date

Review/Exam Week Tuesday (6 June 2017) 9:00 am AEST


Return Date to Students

Two weeks after submission


Weighting
50%

Assessment Criteria

A detailed marking criteria is available on the Moodle website.

Elements assessed for the team component include:

  • Quality of research
  • Quality of presentation
  • Team participation
  • Level of engagement

Elements assessed for the individual component include:

  • Quality of structure
  • Quality of analysis
  • Standard of writing
  • Quality of link to unit concepts
  • Referencing


Referencing Style

Submission
Online

Learning Outcomes Assessed
  • Discuss the social and historical development of journalism from a range of cultural perspectives
  • Explain differences between journalism genres and the way in which genre influences journalistic practice
  • Critique and discuss issues relevant to journalistic practice in a contemporary media environment


Graduate Attributes
  • Communication
  • Problem Solving
  • Critical Thinking
  • Information Literacy
  • Team Work
  • Information Technology Competence
  • Cross Cultural Competence

Academic Integrity Statement

As a CQUniversity student you are expected to act honestly in all aspects of your academic work.

Any assessable work undertaken or submitted for review or assessment must be your own work. Assessable work is any type of work you do to meet the assessment requirements in the unit, including draft work submitted for review and feedback and final work to be assessed.

When you use the ideas, words or data of others in your assessment, you must thoroughly and clearly acknowledge the source of this information by using the correct referencing style for your unit. Using others’ work without proper acknowledgement may be considered a form of intellectual dishonesty.

Participating honestly, respectfully, responsibly, and fairly in your university study ensures the CQUniversity qualification you earn will be valued as a true indication of your individual academic achievement and will continue to receive the respect and recognition it deserves.

As a student, you are responsible for reading and following CQUniversity’s policies, including the Student Academic Integrity Policy and Procedure. This policy sets out CQUniversity’s expectations of you to act with integrity, examples of academic integrity breaches to avoid, the processes used to address alleged breaches of academic integrity, and potential penalties.

What is a breach of academic integrity?

A breach of academic integrity includes but is not limited to plagiarism, self-plagiarism, collusion, cheating, contract cheating, and academic misconduct. The Student Academic Integrity Policy and Procedure defines what these terms mean and gives examples.

Why is academic integrity important?

A breach of academic integrity may result in one or more penalties, including suspension or even expulsion from the University. It can also have negative implications for student visas and future enrolment at CQUniversity or elsewhere. Students who engage in contract cheating also risk being blackmailed by contract cheating services.

Where can I get assistance?

For academic advice and guidance, the Academic Learning Centre (ALC) can support you in becoming confident in completing assessments with integrity and of high standard.

What can you do to act with integrity?