CQUniversity Unit Profile
JOUR11005 Introduction to Journalism
Introduction to Journalism
All details in this unit profile for JOUR11005 have been officially approved by CQUniversity and represent a learning partnership between the University and you (our student).
The information will not be changed unless absolutely necessary and any change will be clearly indicated by an approved correction included in the profile.
General Information

Overview

This unit will introduce students to historical, social and political contexts of journalistic practice. Topics covered include the history of ‘journalism’ in western and eastern cultures, a number of different genres of journalism, journalism as an institution, and media ethics. You will also consider the future of journalism and reflect on examples of best (and worst) practice as part of the unit.

Details

Career Level: Undergraduate
Unit Level: Level 1
Credit Points: 6
Student Contribution Band: 10
Fraction of Full-Time Student Load: 0.125

Pre-requisites or Co-requisites

There are no requisites for this unit.

Important note: Students enrolled in a subsequent unit who failed their pre-requisite unit, should drop the subsequent unit before the census date or within 10 working days of Fail grade notification. Students who do not drop the unit in this timeframe cannot later drop the unit without academic and financial liability. See details in the Assessment Policy and Procedure (Higher Education Coursework).

Offerings For Term 1 - 2021

Cairns
Online
Rockhampton
Townsville

Attendance Requirements

All on-campus students are expected to attend scheduled classes – in some units, these classes are identified as a mandatory (pass/fail) component and attendance is compulsory. International students, on a student visa, must maintain a full time study load and meet both attendance and academic progress requirements in each study period (satisfactory attendance for International students is defined as maintaining at least an 80% attendance record).

Class and Assessment Overview

Recommended Student Time Commitment

Each 6-credit Undergraduate unit at CQUniversity requires an overall time commitment of an average of 12.5 hours of study per week, making a total of 150 hours for the unit.

Class Timetable

Bundaberg, Cairns, Emerald, Gladstone, Mackay, Rockhampton, Townsville
Adelaide, Brisbane, Melbourne, Perth, Sydney

Assessment Overview

1. Written Assessment
Weighting: 20%
2. Written Assessment
Weighting: 40%
3. Written Assessment
Weighting: 40%

Assessment Grading

This is a graded unit: your overall grade will be calculated from the marks or grades for each assessment task, based on the relative weightings shown in the table above. You must obtain an overall mark for the unit of at least 50%, or an overall grade of ‘pass’ in order to pass the unit. If any ‘pass/fail’ tasks are shown in the table above they must also be completed successfully (‘pass’ grade). You must also meet any minimum mark requirements specified for a particular assessment task, as detailed in the ‘assessment task’ section (note that in some instances, the minimum mark for a task may be greater than 50%). Consult the University’s Grades and Results Policy for more details of interim results and final grades.

Previous Student Feedback

Feedback, Recommendations and Responses

Every unit is reviewed for enhancement each year. At the most recent review, the following staff and student feedback items were identified and recommendations were made.

Feedback from Term 1 2020 Student Evaluation comments

Feedback

Students commented around the consistent communication from the lecturer and the effectiveness of the short weekly videos.

Recommendation

It is recommended to maintain consistent communication from the lecturer and continue producing short weekly videos.

Feedback from Term 1 2020 Student Evaluation comments

Feedback

Students commented on the clear explanation provided around the assessment including feedback which will help in future units.

Recommendation

It is recommended to maintain clear explanations around assessment including in-depth feedback which would help in future units.

Feedback from Term 1 2020 Student Evaluation comments

Feedback

Students commented on the possibility of more zoom sessions later in the week due to work commitments.

Recommendation

It is recommended to investigate scheduling further zoom sessions to be held later in the week in future offerings, depending on student attendance.

Unit Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this unit, you will be able to:
  1. Critique contemporary works of journalism against theoretical concepts
  2. Discuss the social and historical development of journalism from a range of cultural perspectives
  3. Explain differences between journalism genres and the way in which genre influences journalistic practice
  4. Critique and discuss issues relevant to journalistic practice in a contemporary media environment
  5. Analyse the impact of media ownership and press freedom in western and non-western countries.

n/a

Alignment of Learning Outcomes, Assessment and Graduate Attributes
N/A Level
Introductory Level
Intermediate Level
Graduate Level
Professional Level
Advanced Level

Alignment of Assessment Tasks to Learning Outcomes

Assessment Tasks Learning Outcomes
1 2 3 4 5
1 - Written Assessment - 20%
2 - Written Assessment - 40%
3 - Written Assessment - 40%

Alignment of Graduate Attributes to Learning Outcomes

Graduate Attributes Learning Outcomes
1 2 3 4 5
1 - Communication
2 - Problem Solving
3 - Critical Thinking
4 - Information Literacy
5 - Team Work
6 - Information Technology Competence
7 - Cross Cultural Competence
8 - Ethical practice
9 - Social Innovation

Alignment of Assessment Tasks to Graduate Attributes

Assessment Tasks Graduate Attributes
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
1 - Written Assessment - 20%
2 - Written Assessment - 40%
3 - Written Assessment - 40%
Textbooks and Resources

Textbooks

There are no required textbooks.

Additional Textbook Information

N/A

IT Resources

You will need access to the following IT resources:
  • CQUniversity Student Email
  • Internet
  • Unit Website (Moodle)
Referencing Style

All submissions for this unit must use the referencing style: American Psychological Association 7th Edition (APA 7th edition)

For further information, see the Assessment Tasks.

Teaching Contacts
Christopher Lawson Unit Coordinator
c.j.lawson@cqu.edu.au
Lincoln Bertoli Unit Coordinator
l.bertoli@cqu.edu.au
Schedule
Module 1 - Journalism as a Profession - Lesson 1 Begin Date: 08 Mar 2021

Module/Topic

Introduction to Journalism

In this lesson the key concepts of journalism will be introduced. Students will explore journalism as a profession and examine what it means to be a journalist in today’s media environment.

Chapter

See e-reading list on Moodle

Events and Submissions/Topic

Module 1 - Journalism as a Profession - Lesson 2 Begin Date: 15 Mar 2021

Module/Topic

The Fourth Estate

This lesson will explore the term 'Fourth Estate' including how and when the term appeared, the meanings ascribed to it by journalists, editors, politicians and other public figures as well as its role in contemporary media.

Chapter

See e-reading list on Moodle

Events and Submissions/Topic

Module 2 - Law and Ethics - Lesson 3 Begin Date: 22 Mar 2021

Module/Topic

Journalism Law

In this lesson students will be introduced to Commonwealth and Queensland laws that impact on journalists. You will explore defamation law, the legalities of court reporting, and examine the defences journalists use to support their editorial decisions.


Chapter

See e-reading list on Moodle

Events and Submissions/Topic

Assessment One - Journalist Selection and Analysis DUE
Monday Week 3 (Monday, 22 March 2021) 5pm AEST


Journalist Selection and Analysis Due: Week 3 Monday (22 Mar 2021) 5:00 pm AEST
Module 2 - Law and Ethics - Lesson 4 Begin Date: 29 Mar 2021

Module/Topic

Journalism Ethics

Lesson Four will examine in greater depth the organisations and ethical codes that regulate the media. Students will learn about the implications for journalists and organisations who breach these codes.

Chapter

See e-reading list on Moodle

Events and Submissions/Topic

Module 3 - Genres of Journalism - Lesson 5 Begin Date: 05 Apr 2021

Module/Topic

Writing and Genre

This lesson will examine the elements that underpin all journalistic writing and introduce different genres.

Chapter

See e-reading list on Moodle

Events and Submissions/Topic

Vacation Week Begin Date: 12 Apr 2021

Module/Topic

Vacation Week 

Chapter

N/A

Events and Submissions/Topic

Module 3 - Genres of Journalism - Lesson 6 Begin Date: 19 Apr 2021

Module/Topic

Genre as it Relates to Journalism

Lesson Six will unpack the definition of ‘genre’ as it relates to journalism, building on introductory concepts and conventions of different journalistic genres.

Chapter

See e-reading list on Moodle

Events and Submissions/Topic

Assessment Two - News Analysis DUE
Friday Week 6 (Friday, 23 April 2021) 5pm AEST


News Analysis Due: Week 6 Friday (23 Apr 2021) 5:00 pm AEST
Module 4 - New Media - Lesson 7 Begin Date: 26 Apr 2021

Module/Topic

New Media Traditions

In this lesson students will be introduced to the concepts of 'new and old' or 'traditional and non-traditional' media. You will explore the differences between analogue and digital technology and discuss some widely used digital media tools.

Chapter

See e-reading list on Moodle

Events and Submissions/Topic


Module 4 - New Media - Lesson 8 Begin Date: 03 May 2021

Module/Topic

Convergence

This lesson you will explore the impact new media is having on journalism. Students will be introduced to the concept of 'convergence' and discuss the future of journalism.

Chapter

See e-reading list on Moodle

Events and Submissions/Topic

Module 5 - Press and Media Freedom in Western Society - Lesson 9 Begin Date: 10 May 2021

Module/Topic

Freedom of the Press

Lesson Nine will look at the history and development of the free press in the West, including government resistance, key players and processes in the United Kingdom, United States and Australia.

Chapter

See e-reading list on Moodle

Events and Submissions/Topic

Module 5 - Press and Media Freedom in Western Society - Lesson 10 Begin Date: 17 May 2021

Module/Topic

Ownership and Regulation

This lesson will explore the issues that arise from concentrated media ownership, as experienced here in Australia, including a lack of diversity and increased political influence.

Chapter

See e-reading list on Moodle

Events and Submissions/Topic

Module 6 - Journalism in Non-Western Countries - Lesson 11 Begin Date: 24 May 2021

Module/Topic

Influence on Practice

Lesson 11 will explore the differences in journalistic practice - including the art of storytelling - in developing and non-democratic countries.

Chapter

See e-reading list on Moodle

Events and Submissions/Topic

Module 6 - Journalism in Non-Western Countries - Lesson 12 Begin Date: 31 May 2021

Module/Topic

Perspective and Practice

To complete the unit, students will review examples of journalistic practice in non-Western countries as examples of the different ways of storytelling.

Chapter

See e-reading list on Moodle

Events and Submissions/Topic

Review/Exam Week Begin Date: 07 Jun 2021

Module/Topic

Chapter

Events and Submissions/Topic

Assessment Three - Discovery Project Presentation DUE

Monday Exam Week (7 June 2021) 5pm AEST


Discovery Project Presentation Due: Review/Exam Week Monday (7 June 2021) 5:00 pm AEST
Exam Week Begin Date: 14 Jun 2021

Module/Topic

Chapter

Events and Submissions/Topic

Assessment Tasks

1 Written Assessment

Assessment Title
Journalist Selection and Analysis

Task Description

In this assessment you will be introduced to the work of professional journalists in a real world context.

From the list of six (6) journalists provided below, select four (4) journalists to analyse. (NOTE: YOU WILL ANALYSE THE WORK OF THE TWO REMAINING JOURNALISTS, AND A JOURNALIST OF YOUR CHOICE, IN DEPTH IN ASSESSMENT THREE. SO CHOOSE WISELY.)
In 1,200 words (300 per journalist) you will articulate why these particular journalists appeal to you, citing some examples of their work against credible references from the first Module of the unit to justify.
Your choices are

  • Kate McClymont (Australia)
  • Jamal Khashoggi (Saudi Arabia)
  • Anderson Cooper (United States)
  • Leigh Sales (Australia)
  • John Sweeney (United Kingdom)
  • Phil Rothfield (Australia)


THIS TASK WILL BE DISCUSSED IN MORE DETAIL ON MOODLE HOWEVER BELOW ARE SOME POINTS TO CONSIDER:

From what you have learned from the unit content in Module One, are your selections 'real' journalists? Does their work identify with the standard definition of journalism? Why?

Are you familiar with the genre of journalism for which they are known?

Were you familiar with some of their notable work before this unit?

(You will explore these concepts and more in detail in Assessment Three but this should help you get started)

To pass you will need to address all of the elements of the assessment including credible references where necessary to justify and cite your sources.
Students who demonstrate limited attention to the requirements of the task will Fail this assessment and will be required to resubmit at a passable level before moving on to the next assessment. 

NOTE: WORD COUNT for written assignments

The word count is considered from the first word of the introduction to the last word of the conclusion. It excludes the cover page, abstract, contents page, reference page and appendices. It includes in-text references and direct quotations.


Assessment Due Date

Week 3 Monday (22 Mar 2021) 5:00 pm AEST

Online


Return Date to Students

Week 4 Monday (29 Mar 2021)

Assessments will be returned within a week of submission.


Weighting
20%

Assessment Criteria

Elements considered for this assessment include:

  • Attention to task requirements
  • Quality of Analysis
  • Quality of writing
  • Link to unit concepts


Referencing Style

Submission
Online

Submission Instructions
Submit as a Word or PDF document through Moodle.

Learning Outcomes Assessed
  • Critique contemporary works of journalism against theoretical concepts


Graduate Attributes
  • Communication
  • Critical Thinking
  • Information Literacy
  • Information Technology Competence

2 Written Assessment

Assessment Title
News Analysis

Task Description

This task requires you to analyse news in order to compare genres and approaches to journalistic practice.

Select and analyse three (3) contemporary news stories (published in the first six weeks of term), including:

One (1) Sports news story; AND

One (1) Police or Court news story; AND

One (1) Political news story.

YOU WILL POST THE LINKS TO YOUR NEWS STORY ON THE Q&A FORUM BY THE END OF WEEK FOUR (4)

At least one (1) of these three stories should be of extended length (more than 1000 words), either a feature item, investigative piece, media interview or current affairs segment.

You will need to submit copies of the three (3) news stories you have chosen as appendices to your essay. These appendices can be scanned copies of print articles, transcripts (if the story was broadcast), or a 'cut and paste' of an online article (including the original link to the story).
The appendices of the news stories need to be in such a form that teaching staff can refer to the original material. You will also need to include the details of the news stories as references in your assessment's Reference List.

PART A - there is no word limit for this section but consult the exemplar provided as a guide.
Analyse EACH of the three stories using the following criteria.

1. List the who, what, where, when, why and how of each story.

2. List and justify the dominant news values in each of the news stories.

3. List the sources used in each article including primary and secondary where relevant.

4. Identify the target audience based on the placement / presentation of each article. Which section? Was the story front page? Was it the top link? Was it the most prominent sports story?

PART B - 1,500 words.
Compare and contrast the three stories incorporating the following information.

Compare the differences in sources used in the three articles such as quoted facts and figures, personalities and/or identities.

What are the differences in the way the stories are written and presented? Account for differences in style, format and presentation. Consider the angle or the way the story is framed.

Discuss the significance of the three (3) stories in terms of their prominence and placement in the media outlet you have chosen.

What do the prominence and presentation of the three (3) stories tell you about the readership or audience of the local or state outlets in which they appear?

You are expected to reference your discussion.

NOTE: WORD COUNT for written assignments

The word count is considered from the first word of the introduction to the last word of the conclusion. It excludes the cover page, abstract, contents page, reference page and appendices. It includes in-text references and direct quotations.


Assessment Due Date

Week 6 Friday (23 Apr 2021) 5:00 pm AEST

Online


Return Date to Students

Week 8 Friday (7 May 2021)

Assessments will be returned within two weeks of submission


Weighting
40%

Assessment Criteria

A detailed marking criteria is available on the Moodle website.

Elements assessed include:

  • Quality of news stories
  • Accuracy of referencing
  • Standard of presentation including expression
  • Relevance to unit concepts
  • Depth of analysis (rather than description)
  • Argumentation and appropriate use of examples
  • Appropriate introduction and conclusion


Referencing Style

Submission
Online

Submission Instructions
Submit as a Word or PDF document through Moodle.

Learning Outcomes Assessed
  • Discuss the social and historical development of journalism from a range of cultural perspectives
  • Explain differences between journalism genres and the way in which genre influences journalistic practice


Graduate Attributes
  • Communication
  • Critical Thinking
  • Information Literacy
  • Information Technology Competence
  • Social Innovation

3 Written Assessment

Assessment Title
Discovery Project Presentation

Task Description

Analyse, in-depth, the work of THREE (3) journalists and present a detailed presentation on those journalists. Your selection of journalists will comprise the two (2) remaining journalists from the list supplied in Assessment One, and one (1) credible journalist of your choice.
You must support your analysis with a slide or video presentation (no more than six slides per journalist). See exemplars for guidance. Your final slide will include references.
All photographs used within the presentation must also be referenced. There is no word limit but presentations on each journalist will need to include an embedded voice-over (between 5 - 7 minutes each).
You will submit your presentation via Portfolium. Further instructions on file size and submission will be provided on Moodle throughout the unit.

The following criteria will help guide your research/structure for your presentations:


1. Provide a summary of this person's work.
2. Justify whether this person is a 'real' journalist using the definition of journalism in your textbook.
3. Explain whether the journalist's work reflects the ideals of The Fourth Estate.
4. Explain the genre for which the journalist is renowned.
5. Describe the journalist's most significant contribution to public knowledge or interest.
6. Describe the journalist's practice in terms of law and ethics.
7. List and explain the journalist's limitations/shortcomings.
8. Describe what you personally like the most about this journalist's work, and why.
9. Describe what you personally dislike about this journalist's work, and why.
10. Explain how the journalist might influence your approach to journalism as a profession, and why.


Assessment Due Date

Review/Exam Week Monday (7 June 2021) 5:00 pm AEST

Online


Return Date to Students

Exam Week Friday (18 June 2021)

Assessments will be returned within two weeks of submission.


Weighting
40%

Assessment Criteria

A detailed marking criteria is available on the Moodle website.

Elements assessed for the individual component include:

  • Quality of presentation
  • Quality of research
  • Attention to task requirements
  • Quality of referencing / link to unit concepts



Referencing Style

Submission
Online

Submission Instructions
Submit as a video or PowerPoint presentation through Portfolium on Moodle.

Learning Outcomes Assessed
  • Critique and discuss issues relevant to journalistic practice in a contemporary media environment
  • Analyse the impact of media ownership and press freedom in western and non-western countries.


Graduate Attributes
  • Communication
  • Critical Thinking
  • Information Technology Competence
  • Social Innovation

Academic Integrity Statement

As a CQUniversity student you are expected to act honestly in all aspects of your academic work.

Any assessable work undertaken or submitted for review or assessment must be your own work. Assessable work is any type of work you do to meet the assessment requirements in the unit, including draft work submitted for review and feedback and final work to be assessed.

When you use the ideas, words or data of others in your assessment, you must thoroughly and clearly acknowledge the source of this information by using the correct referencing style for your unit. Using others’ work without proper acknowledgement may be considered a form of intellectual dishonesty.

Participating honestly, respectfully, responsibly, and fairly in your university study ensures the CQUniversity qualification you earn will be valued as a true indication of your individual academic achievement and will continue to receive the respect and recognition it deserves.

As a student, you are responsible for reading and following CQUniversity’s policies, including the Student Academic Integrity Policy and Procedure. This policy sets out CQUniversity’s expectations of you to act with integrity, examples of academic integrity breaches to avoid, the processes used to address alleged breaches of academic integrity, and potential penalties.

What is a breach of academic integrity?

A breach of academic integrity includes but is not limited to plagiarism, self-plagiarism, collusion, cheating, contract cheating, and academic misconduct. The Student Academic Integrity Policy and Procedure defines what these terms mean and gives examples.

Why is academic integrity important?

A breach of academic integrity may result in one or more penalties, including suspension or even expulsion from the University. It can also have negative implications for student visas and future enrolment at CQUniversity or elsewhere. Students who engage in contract cheating also risk being blackmailed by contract cheating services.

Where can I get assistance?

For academic advice and guidance, the Academic Learning Centre (ALC) can support you in becoming confident in completing assessments with integrity and of high standard.

What can you do to act with integrity?