CQUniversity Unit Profile
LAWS11057 Introduction to Law
Introduction to Law
All details in this unit profile for LAWS11057 have been officially approved by CQUniversity and represent a learning partnership between the University and you (our student).
The information will not be changed unless absolutely necessary and any change will be clearly indicated by an approved correction included in the profile.
General Information

Overview

This unit introduces you to the study of law by examining the history out of which our law developed and examining how the law responds to the socio-legal conditions of our time. It provides you with an awareness of the institutions which are created by the law and how those institutions shape the development of the law. You will be introduced to the notion of legal reasoning: distinguishing the 'dicta' and 'obiter' of cases, precedent theory, case analysis, following and distinguishing precedent; as well as distinguishing between primary and delegated legislation. This unit introduces you to legal discourse and the conventions of the discipline which will provide a foundation for study in more advanced units.

Details

Career Level: Undergraduate
Unit Level: Level 1
Credit Points: 6
Student Contribution Band: 10
Fraction of Full-Time Student Load: 0.125

Pre-requisites or Co-requisites

There are no requisites for this unit.

Important note: Students enrolled in a subsequent unit who failed their pre-requisite unit, should drop the subsequent unit before the census date or within 10 working days of Fail grade notification. Students who do not drop the unit in this timeframe cannot later drop the unit without academic and financial liability. See details in the Assessment Policy and Procedure (Higher Education Coursework).

Offerings For Term 2 - 2021

Online

Attendance Requirements

All on-campus students are expected to attend scheduled classes – in some units, these classes are identified as a mandatory (pass/fail) component and attendance is compulsory. International students, on a student visa, must maintain a full time study load and meet both attendance and academic progress requirements in each study period (satisfactory attendance for International students is defined as maintaining at least an 80% attendance record).

Class and Assessment Overview

Recommended Student Time Commitment

Each 6-credit Undergraduate unit at CQUniversity requires an overall time commitment of an average of 12.5 hours of study per week, making a total of 150 hours for the unit.

Class Timetable

Bundaberg, Cairns, Emerald, Gladstone, Mackay, Rockhampton, Townsville
Adelaide, Brisbane, Melbourne, Perth, Sydney

Assessment Overview

1. Online Quiz(zes)
Weighting: 20%
2. Learning logs / diaries / Journal / log books
Weighting: 40%
3. Written Assessment
Weighting: 40%

Assessment Grading

This is a graded unit: your overall grade will be calculated from the marks or grades for each assessment task, based on the relative weightings shown in the table above. You must obtain an overall mark for the unit of at least 50%, or an overall grade of ‘pass’ in order to pass the unit. If any ‘pass/fail’ tasks are shown in the table above they must also be completed successfully (‘pass’ grade). You must also meet any minimum mark requirements specified for a particular assessment task, as detailed in the ‘assessment task’ section (note that in some instances, the minimum mark for a task may be greater than 50%). Consult the University’s Grades and Results Policy for more details of interim results and final grades.

Previous Student Feedback

Feedback, Recommendations and Responses

Every unit is reviewed for enhancement each year. At the most recent review, the following staff and student feedback items were identified and recommendations were made.

Feedback from Student Feedback and Self-Reflection

Feedback

Streamline assessment requirements, reducing the number of different systems and elements required to complete assessment tasks.

Recommendation

Simplify assessment requirements, particularly in the first assessment task, to support the onboarding process for students.

Feedback from Student Feedback and Self-Reflection

Feedback

More individualised feedback for all assessments would be helpful.

Recommendation

Provide individualised feedback for all assessments.

Unit Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this unit, you will be able to:
  1. Describe and discuss the rule of law, the nature of the Australian legal system and ethical responsibility
  2. Explain how the law is made and developed in Australia
  3. Demonstrate basic skills in legal research and writing using appropriate referencing standards
  4. Develop basic skills in critical legal thinking, reasoning and reflection.
Alignment of Learning Outcomes, Assessment and Graduate Attributes
N/A Level
Introductory Level
Intermediate Level
Graduate Level
Professional Level
Advanced Level

Alignment of Assessment Tasks to Learning Outcomes

Assessment Tasks Learning Outcomes
1 2 3 4
1 - Online Quiz(zes) - 20%
2 - Learning logs / diaries / Journal / log books - 40%
3 - Written Assessment - 40%

Alignment of Graduate Attributes to Learning Outcomes

Graduate Attributes Learning Outcomes
1 2 3 4
1 - Communication
2 - Problem Solving
3 - Critical Thinking
4 - Information Literacy
5 - Team Work
6 - Information Technology Competence
7 - Cross Cultural Competence
8 - Ethical practice
9 - Social Innovation

Alignment of Assessment Tasks to Graduate Attributes

Assessment Tasks Graduate Attributes
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
1 - Online Quiz(zes) - 20%
2 - Learning logs / diaries / Journal / log books - 40%
3 - Written Assessment - 40%
Textbooks and Resources

Textbooks

There are no required textbooks.

IT Resources

You will need access to the following IT resources:
  • CQUniversity Student Email
  • Internet
  • Unit Website (Moodle)
  • Zoom
  • Microsoft Teams
Referencing Style

All submissions for this unit must use the referencing style: Australian Guide to Legal Citation, 4th ed

For further information, see the Assessment Tasks.

Teaching Contacts
Luke Price Unit Coordinator
l.price@cqu.edu.au
Wayne Jones Unit Coordinator
w.jones@cqu.edu.au
Schedule
Week 1 Begin Date: 12 Jul 2021

Module/Topic

Exploring the Law

Chapter

Byrne, Greg, ‘The High Court in Pell v The Queen: An ‘unreasonable’ review of the jury’s decision’ (2020) 45(4) Alternative Law Journal 284

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 2 Begin Date: 19 Jul 2021

Module/Topic

Navigating legal information

Chapter

Read the following sections in the AGLC4:

1.1, 1.4, 1.5,

2.1 - 2.4

3.1 - 3.2

3.4 - 3.6

5.1 - 5.7

6.1 - 6.4

7.11

7.15

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 3 Begin Date: 26 Jul 2021

Module/Topic

Critical thinking and using evidence

Chapter

Anne-Marie Slaughter, ‘On thinking like a lawyer’, https://scholar.princeton.edu/sites/default/files/slaughter/files/onthinkinglikealawyer.pdf


Gerald Lebovits, ‘The Legal Writer, Say It Ain't So: Leading Logical Fallacies in Legal Argument – Part 1’, 88 N.Y. St. B.J. 64 (July/August 2016)


Gerald Lebovits, ‘The Legal Writer, Say It Ain’t So: Leading Logical Fallacies in Legal Argument – Part 2’, 88 N.Y. St. B.J. 64 (Sept. 2016)


‘The Art of Written Persuasion: From IRAC to FAILSAFE – A Compilation of Legal Problem-Solving Models’, https://www.llrx.com/2008/10/the-art-of-written-persuasion-from-irac-to-failsafe-a-compilation-of-legal-problem-solving-models/

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 4 Begin Date: 02 Aug 2021

Module/Topic

Using legal sources: Rules and Principles

Chapter

Kath Hall and Clare Macken, Legislation and Statutory Interpretation (LexisNexis Butterworths, 4th ed, 2015) Chapter 4 ‘Statutory Interpretation’

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 5 Begin Date: 09 Aug 2021

Module/Topic

Using legal sources: Precedents

Chapter

Reading: Robin Creyke et al, Laying Down the Law (LexisNexis Butterworths, 10th ed, 2018), sections 6.9 - 6.20

Events and Submissions/Topic

Workbooks Due: Week 5 Wednesday (11 Aug 2021) 1:00 pm AEST
Vacation Week Begin Date: 16 Aug 2021

Module/Topic

Chapter

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 6 Begin Date: 23 Aug 2021

Module/Topic

Being a lawyer and being ethical

Chapter

Kim D Chanbonpin, ‘Legal Writing, the Remix: Plagiarism and Hip Hop Ethics’ (2011) Mercer Law Review, (2012) 63 Mercer LR 597


Legal Services Commissioner v Bui [2018] QCAT 424


Carrie Menkel-Meadow, ‘When Winning Isn’t Everything: The Lawyer as Problem Solver’ (2000) 28 Hofstra LR 905

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 7 Begin Date: 30 Aug 2021

Module/Topic

Integrated legal problem solving

Chapter

Jennifer Greaney, Principles and Practice of Australian Law (Lawbook Co, 4th ed, 2020), Chapter 5 ‘Access to Law’.

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 8 Begin Date: 06 Sep 2021

Module/Topic

Law in society

Chapter

Nick Chater, ‘Could we live without laws?’, https://theconversation.com/could-we-live-in-a-world-without-rules-128664


Harman J, ‘The Rule of Law - Law as an Instrument of Justice and a Tool of Oppression’, Legal Studies Teachers Conference 15 March, 2014


Jack Goldring, ‘Australian Lawyers and Social Change – 30 Years Later’, https://law.anu.edu.au/sites/all/files/media/documents/events/goldring_-_30_years_later.pdf

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 9 Begin Date: 13 Sep 2021

Module/Topic

Law and changemaking

Chapter

Portable, Design for Justice: How technology and design can help to deliver justice better (2018), report

Events and Submissions/Topic

Legal Problem Solving Exercise Due: Week 9 Wednesday (15 Sept 2021) 1:00 pm AEST
Week 10 Begin Date: 20 Sep 2021

Module/Topic

Law and justice careers

Chapter

The Law Society of New South Wales, FLIP: The Future of Law and Innovation in the Profession, 2017, https://lawsociety.cld.bz/online-flip-report/114

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 11 Begin Date: 27 Sep 2021

Module/Topic

Prognostications and procrastinations

Chapter

No set reading

Events and Submissions/Topic

Quizzes Due: Week 11 Wednesday (29 Sept 2021) 1:00 pm AEST
Week 12 Begin Date: 04 Oct 2021

Module/Topic

Job interview simulations, continued

Chapter

Events and Submissions/Topic

Review/Exam Week Begin Date: 11 Oct 2021

Module/Topic

Chapter

Events and Submissions/Topic

Exam Week Begin Date: 18 Oct 2021

Module/Topic

Chapter

Events and Submissions/Topic

Assessment Tasks

1 Online Quiz(zes)

Assessment Title
Quizzes

Task Description

In this unit you will be reading articles and materials that will broaden your understanding of the topics of law and justice. A quiz at the end of each module (modules 1-10) will test your comprehension and ability to apply concepts from these readings.

Each quiz will assign you four questions, drawn randomly from a bank, each worth a half mark for a total of 2% for each module. You will be required to complete the lesson activities for each module before the quiz becomes available to complete.


Number of Quizzes

10


Frequency of Quizzes

Weekly


Assessment Due Date

Week 11 Wednesday (29 Sept 2021) 1:00 pm AEST


Return Date to Students

Week 11 Wednesday (29 Sept 2021)


Weighting
20%

Assessment Criteria

  • Comprehension of set reading materials.
  • Application of concepts from the readings to topics in this unit.
  • Evaluation of propositions, using the evidence base provided by reading materials.


Referencing Style

Submission
Online

Learning Outcomes Assessed
  • Describe and discuss the rule of law, the nature of the Australian legal system and ethical responsibility


Graduate Attributes
  • Communication
  • Critical Thinking
  • Information Literacy
  • Information Technology Competence
  • Cross Cultural Competence
  • Ethical practice

2 Learning logs / diaries / Journal / log books

Assessment Title
Workbooks

Task Description

This unit emphasises practical and applied learning, to draw connections between the reading/preparatory material and the real world context in which it is used. Each workshop is designed around a challenge that tests your skills, with the support of a small group of peers online. To evidence what you have learned, you will write individual reflective reports on each of the workshop activities in which you participate. Each will be roughly one half to one page in length and can include elements such as tables or diagrams.

Your Workbook will include a total of ten reports connected to the challenge tasks in workshops 1 to 10. These are due to be submitted at two different deadlines. Workbooks for modules 1 to 4 are due in week 5 in order to give you an understanding of your progress. The remaining workbooks, 5 to 10 are due in week 12.

Each challenge includes two different tasks. There is a compulsory core challenge task that requires preparation and participation in the weekly workshops. In addition, there is also an optional extended challenge each week that requires students to do additional work on their own initiative. Each challenge (core and extended) is worth 2 marks for satisfactory completion. It is possible to pass this unit by completing all the core challenge tasks to a satisfactory degree.

If you are unable to attend any workshops, these challenge tasks may be completed in a study group that you organise with peers at your own convenience.


Assessment Due Date

Week 5 Wednesday (11 Aug 2021) 1:00 pm AEST

Workbooks for modules 1 to 4 are due in week 5 in order to give you an understanding of your progress. The remaining workbooks, 5 to 10 are due in week 12.


Return Date to Students

Week 7 Wednesday (1 Sept 2021)

Workbooks will be returned two weeks from each of the submission dates.


Weighting
40%

Assessment Criteria

  • Use creative problem solving in response to challenges.
  • Report succinctly on challenge task activities and what you have learnt from them.
  • Reflect on your learning process and set educational goals for the future.
  • Understand how theories and concepts from the coursework integrate into practical and applied situations.
  • Participate in small team activities and actively support peers’ learning.

  • Referencing Style

    Submission
    Online

    Learning Outcomes Assessed
    • Describe and discuss the rule of law, the nature of the Australian legal system and ethical responsibility
    • Explain how the law is made and developed in Australia
    • Demonstrate basic skills in legal research and writing using appropriate referencing standards
    • Develop basic skills in critical legal thinking, reasoning and reflection.


    Graduate Attributes
    • Communication
    • Problem Solving
    • Critical Thinking
    • Information Literacy
    • Information Technology Competence

    3 Written Assessment

    Assessment Title
    Legal Problem Solving Exercise

    Task Description

    In this unit, you will be learning practical skills for working in and around the legal and justice systems. The first half of the term will teach you how to find, use and evaluate legal authorities and sources of information. To test what you have learnt, you will complete a legal problem solving exercise which will be released in week 7 and due in week 9. This will be supported by a workshop challenge in week 7 that features a hypothetical problem.

    You will be assessed on your ability to explain your reasoning, the steps you took in solving the problem and the decisions that you made. In short you will need to “show your working”. The two week turnaround has, in part, been required to reduce the potential of contract cheating and also to facilitate planning skills.


    Assessment Due Date

    Week 9 Wednesday (15 Sept 2021) 1:00 pm AEST


    Return Date to Students

    Week 11 Wednesday (29 Sept 2021)


    Weighting
    40%

    Assessment Criteria

  • Understanding of legal concepts and the distinction between legal and social issues.
  • Application of authorities and different sources of information.
  • Reflection on learning via explanation of the steps of the process and rationale for choices made.
  • Evaluation of evidence and authorities by making clear recommendations.
  • Ability to work to a deadline including setting clear frameworks around project parameters.

  • Referencing Style

    Submission
    Online

    Learning Outcomes Assessed
    • Describe and discuss the rule of law, the nature of the Australian legal system and ethical responsibility
    • Explain how the law is made and developed in Australia
    • Demonstrate basic skills in legal research and writing using appropriate referencing standards
    • Develop basic skills in critical legal thinking, reasoning and reflection.


    Graduate Attributes
    • Communication
    • Problem Solving
    • Critical Thinking
    • Information Literacy
    • Ethical practice

    Academic Integrity Statement

    As a CQUniversity student you are expected to act honestly in all aspects of your academic work.

    Any assessable work undertaken or submitted for review or assessment must be your own work. Assessable work is any type of work you do to meet the assessment requirements in the unit, including draft work submitted for review and feedback and final work to be assessed.

    When you use the ideas, words or data of others in your assessment, you must thoroughly and clearly acknowledge the source of this information by using the correct referencing style for your unit. Using others’ work without proper acknowledgement may be considered a form of intellectual dishonesty.

    Participating honestly, respectfully, responsibly, and fairly in your university study ensures the CQUniversity qualification you earn will be valued as a true indication of your individual academic achievement and will continue to receive the respect and recognition it deserves.

    As a student, you are responsible for reading and following CQUniversity’s policies, including the Student Academic Integrity Policy and Procedure. This policy sets out CQUniversity’s expectations of you to act with integrity, examples of academic integrity breaches to avoid, the processes used to address alleged breaches of academic integrity, and potential penalties.

    What is a breach of academic integrity?

    A breach of academic integrity includes but is not limited to plagiarism, self-plagiarism, collusion, cheating, contract cheating, and academic misconduct. The Student Academic Integrity Policy and Procedure defines what these terms mean and gives examples.

    Why is academic integrity important?

    A breach of academic integrity may result in one or more penalties, including suspension or even expulsion from the University. It can also have negative implications for student visas and future enrolment at CQUniversity or elsewhere. Students who engage in contract cheating also risk being blackmailed by contract cheating services.

    Where can I get assistance?

    For academic advice and guidance, the Academic Learning Centre (ALC) can support you in becoming confident in completing assessments with integrity and of high standard.

    What can you do to act with integrity?