CQUniversity Unit Profile
MGMT20149 Foundations of Public Administration
Foundations of Public Administration
All details in this unit profile for MGMT20149 have been officially approved by CQUniversity and represent a learning partnership between the University and you (our student).
The information will not be changed unless absolutely necessary and any change will be clearly indicated by an approved correction included in the profile.
General Information

Overview

In this unit, you will be equipped with the skills and knowledge needed to identify and analyse practical issues in the complex environment of public administration. This unit introduces you to the core principles and functions of public administration and the complex global setting within which public administration operates. You will develop a critical understanding of the different levels of government and their respective jurisdictions and responsibilities and the challenges of managing between these levels. You will also consider public sector reforms (both in Australia and internationally), and use relevant theories to evaluate their implementation. This includes developing your understanding of the shift from the provision of services by public authorities to mechanisms such as collaboration and competition, public-private partnership, and contracting the private and not for profit sectors to deliver services on behalf of the government.

Details

Career Level: Postgraduate
Unit Level: Level 8
Credit Points: 6
Student Contribution Band: 10
Fraction of Full-Time Student Load: 0.125

Pre-requisites or Co-requisites

There are no requisites for this unit.

Important note: Students enrolled in a subsequent unit who failed their pre-requisite unit, should drop the subsequent unit before the census date or within 10 working days of Fail grade notification. Students who do not drop the unit in this timeframe cannot later drop the unit without academic and financial liability. See details in the Assessment Policy and Procedure (Higher Education Coursework).

Offerings For Term 1 - 2020

Melbourne
Online

Attendance Requirements

All on-campus students are expected to attend scheduled classes – in some units, these classes are identified as a mandatory (pass/fail) component and attendance is compulsory. International students, on a student visa, must maintain a full time study load and meet both attendance and academic progress requirements in each study period (satisfactory attendance for International students is defined as maintaining at least an 80% attendance record).

Class and Assessment Overview

Recommended Student Time Commitment

Each 6-credit Postgraduate unit at CQUniversity requires an overall time commitment of an average of 12.5 hours of study per week, making a total of 150 hours for the unit.

Class Timetable

Bundaberg, Cairns, Emerald, Gladstone, Mackay, Rockhampton, Townsville
Adelaide, Brisbane, Melbourne, Perth, Sydney

Assessment Overview

1. Research Assignment
Weighting: 40%
2. Research Assignment
Weighting: 40%
3. Presentation
Weighting: 20%

Assessment Grading

This is a graded unit: your overall grade will be calculated from the marks or grades for each assessment task, based on the relative weightings shown in the table above. You must obtain an overall mark for the unit of at least 50%, or an overall grade of ‘pass’ in order to pass the unit. If any ‘pass/fail’ tasks are shown in the table above they must also be completed successfully (‘pass’ grade). You must also meet any minimum mark requirements specified for a particular assessment task, as detailed in the ‘assessment task’ section (note that in some instances, the minimum mark for a task may be greater than 50%). Consult the University’s Grades and Results Policy for more details of interim results and final grades.

Unit Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this unit, you will be able to:
  1. Identify, analyse, and apply the knowledge, skills and abilities required by public sector managers
  2. Examine the functions and operations of public administration organisations
  3. Assess the rationale and effectiveness of public sector reforms
  4. Demonstrate advanced knowledge and skills required to effectively manage across the public, private and not for profit sectors.
Alignment of Learning Outcomes, Assessment and Graduate Attributes
N/A Level
Introductory Level
Intermediate Level
Graduate Level
Professional Level
Advanced Level

Alignment of Assessment Tasks to Learning Outcomes

Assessment Tasks Learning Outcomes
1 2 3 4
1 - Research Assignment - 40%
2 - Research Assignment - 40%
3 - Presentation - 20%

Alignment of Graduate Attributes to Learning Outcomes

Graduate Attributes Learning Outcomes
1 2 3 4
1 - Knowledge
2 - Communication
3 - Cognitive, technical and creative skills
4 - Research
5 - Self-management
6 - Ethical and Professional Responsibility
7 - Leadership

Alignment of Assessment Tasks to Graduate Attributes

Assessment Tasks Graduate Attributes
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
1 - Research Assignment - 40%
2 - Research Assignment - 40%
3 - Presentation - 20%
Textbooks and Resources

Textbooks

There are no required textbooks.

Additional Textbook Information

The selected articles and cases will be posted for each week's topics.

Lecture notes will be prepared using the prescribed readings.


IT Resources

You will need access to the following IT resources:
  • CQUniversity Student Email
  • Internet
  • Unit Website (Moodle)
Referencing Style

No referencing style set.

Teaching Contacts
Quamrul Alam Unit Coordinator
q.alam@cqu.edu.au
Schedule
Week 1: Public Administration in the 21st Century Begin Date: 09 Mar 2020

Module/Topic

Explaining Public Administration - Unit overview and Introduction

 

Chapter

Selecting weekly readings and resources: where to go, what to look for, and introducing our own discoveries and reflections.

 

United Nations, Economic and Social Council. 2006. Definition of basic concepts and terminologies in governance and public administration. UNPAN022332. New York.

 

Frederickson, H. G., Smith, K. B., Larimer, C. W., & Licari, M. J. 2012. The Public Administration Theory Primer. 2nd ed. Boulder, CO: Westview Press. [Access available at https://s3.amazonaws.com/academia.edu.documents/34073851/Frederickson__ The_Public_Administration_Theory_Primer.pdf?response-content-disposition=inline%3B%20filename%3DFrederickson_The_Public_Administration_ T.pdf&X-Amz-Algorithm=AWS4-HMAC-SHA256&X-Amz-Credential=AKIAIWOWYYGZ2Y53UL3A%2F20190616%2Fus-east-1%2Fs3%2Faws4_request&X-Amz-Date=20190616T005952Z&X-Amz- Expires=3600&X-Amz-SignedHeaders=host&X-Amz-Signature=54b9143a00b117d2513fdca006d32ce173e476f5e995d 0c19395d68dcd623e2a

Events and Submissions/Topic

Students will have a clear understanding of the structure and expectations of the unit, teaching methods, discussion sessions, learning materials, and assignments.

Students will understand the role of public administration in government, the basic concepts that inform it, including diversity of approaches, how it differs from other forms of administration and how it builds on acceptance of core principles and functions that are also subject to review and change.

Students will get a better understanding how the currents in public administration are subject to constant movement, even fashion, and they will be able to identify the main directions of public administration reform. A theme throughout the unit will be the importance of understanding and acknowledging historical context together with socio-political context.

Using the UN Secretariat Note as a starting point, students will be equipped with broadly agreed key definitions.

Week 2 Begin Date: 16 Mar 2020

Module/Topic

Shifts in paradigms of public administration in a globalizing environment

 

Chapter

Adelman, I. 1999. The role of government in economic development. Working Paper No.890, California Agricultural Experiment Station, Giannini Foundation of Agricultural Economics.

 

Christensen, T., & Lægreid, P. 2011. Post-NPM reforms: The whole of Government approaches as a new trend. New Steering Concepts in Public Management 21: 11-24.

 Puppim de Oliveira, J. A., Jing, Y., & Collins, P. 2015. Public administration for development: Trends and the way forward. Public Administration and Development 35: 65-72.

Events and Submissions/Topic

What are, and have been, significant currents in public administration? How do they respond to context and tradition? Students will come to understand the shifts in the rationale for government involvement in development and especially how these impacted on the developing world.

Week 3 Begin Date: 23 Mar 2020

Module/Topic

State and public administration

The levels (tiers) of government: national, state / provincial, local

 

Chapter

Kraak, A. 2011. Horizontal coordination, government performance and national planning: The possibilities and limits of the South African State. Politikon 38(3): 343-365

 

Samaratunge, R., O’Neill, D., Coghill, K., & Wijayarathne, B. 2017. Building horizontal coordination in Sri Lanka. Public Administration and Development 37: 319-330.

 

Egeberg, M., & Trondal, J. 2016. Why strong coordination at one level of government is incompatible with strong coordination across levels (and how to live with it): The case of the European Union. Public Administration 94(3): 579-592.

 Wangchuk, D., & Turner, M. 2019. Aligning top-down and bottom-up in development planning: The case of Bhutan. Public Administration Development 39:59-68.

 The Australian Constitution.

Events and Submissions/Topic

Through review of case readings and discussion perspectives on the challenges of coordination, students will develop an understanding about the contestability of views on it and the challenges that remain.

Students will understand jurisdictional choices and the implications for administration: the challenge of coordination – top-down, bottom-up, horizontal, other, and how these are arrived.

Week 4 Begin Date: 30 Mar 2020

Module/Topic

Public sector reform: from traditional through to New Public Management and beyond

 

Chapter

Denhardt, J.V., & Denhardt, R.B. 2015. The New Public Service revisited. Public Administration Review 75(5): 664-672.

 

Manning, N. 2001. The legacy of the New Public Management in developing countries. International Review of Administrative Sciences 67: 297-312.

 

Samaratunge, R., & Wijewardena, N. 2009. The changing nature of public values in developing countries. International Journal of Public Administration 32: 313-327.

 Groenveld, S., & Van de Walle, S. 2011. Steering for outcomes: The role of public management. New Steering Concepts in Public Management 21: 1-8.

Events and Submissions/Topic

Through the readings, discussion and reflection this week students will understand the significance of the New Public Management direction and the reforms it promoted – and even imposed – but also foreseeable (but often ignored) consequences.

Week 5 Begin Date: 06 Apr 2020

Module/Topic

Competitive models of administration and service delivery

Chapter

Banks, G. 2012. Competition Policy’s regulatory innovations: quo vadis? Productivity Commission, Australian Government, Canberra.

 Matthews, J. H., & Sulman, A. D. 2005. Competitive advantage in public sector organizations: Explaining the public good/sustainable competitive advantage paradox. Journal of Business Research 58(2): 232-240.

Events and Submissions/Topic

Using the extensive, but not always successful, National Competition Policy in Australia as a baseline case, students will appreciate the likely limits to competition as the preferred mechanism for service delivery in the public sector.


Individual written assignment 1 Due: Week 5 Monday (6 Apr 2020) 11:55 pm AEST
Vacation Week Begin Date: 13 Apr 2020

Module/Topic

Chapter

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 6 Begin Date: 20 Apr 2020

Module/Topic

Collaborative models of administration and service delivery

Chapter

Alford, J., & Hughes, O. 2008. Public value pragmatism as the next phase of public management. The American Review of Public Administration 38(2): 130-148.

 

Entwhistle, T., & Martin, S. 2005. From competition to collaboration in public service delivery: A new agenda for research. Public Administration 83(1): 233-242.

 Keast, R. L., & Brown, K. A. 2006. Adjusting to new ways of working: Experiments with service delivery in the public sector. Australian Journal of Public Administration 65(4): 41-53; post printed via https://epubs.scu.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?referer=&httpsredir=1&article= 1762&context=bus_pubs

Events and Submissions/Topic

Using the Alford-Hughes reading as a springboard, students will be encouraged to consider the virtues of ‘agility’ in approaches to public administration, in place of the more doctrinaire approaches of New Public Management or, earlier, hierarchical systems that became historically embedded.

Week 7 Begin Date: 27 Apr 2020

Module/Topic

Public-private partnerships: do they work and if so how, and what do they mean for public administration?

Chapter

Hodge, G. A., & Greve, C. 2007. Public-Private Partnerships: An international performance review. Public Administration Review May-June: 545-558.

 

Sarmento, J. M. 2010. Do public-private partnerships create value for money for the public sector? The Portuguese experience. OECD Journal on Budgeting 2010/1: 93-119.

 

Australian Government, Infrastructure Australia website, https://www.infrastructureaustralia.gov.au/policy-publications/public-private-partnerships/

 PwC [Pricewaterhouse Cooper]. 2017. Reimagining Public Private Partnerships. https://www.pwc.com.au/legal/assets/reimagining-ppps-oct17.pdf

Events and Submissions/Topic

In this, and the following two sessions, students will gain understanding of the differing challenges for public administration in three government areas of contracting out service delivery: public-private partnerships (PPPs), the private sector, and the not-for-profit sector. None of these indeed remove the role of public administration, but they do subtly and not-so-subtly change it.

In some quarters the benefits of PPPs are treated as obvious, but they may also be accompanied by ‘commercial-in-confidence’ claims by partners (and government), which means that transparency of any kind is difficult to gain.

Week 8 Begin Date: 04 May 2020

Module/Topic

Contracting to the private sector

Chapter

Friedman, M. 1970. The social responsibility of business is to increase its profits. The New York Times Magazine 13 September.

 

Verspaandonk, R. 2001. Outsourcing – for and against. Current Issues Brief 18, 2000-01. Parliamentary Library, Canberra.

 

Cohen, S., & Eimicke, W. 2010. Contracting out. What is contracting and why is it growing?

https://academiccommons.columbia.edu/doi/10.7916/D8154S94/download

 

1.     Mulgan, R. 1997. Contracting out and accountability. Discussion Paper 51. Public Policy Discussion Papers, Australian National University, Canberra.

 Hefetz, A., & Warner, M. E. 2011. Contracting or public delivery? The importance of service, market, and management characteristic. Journal of Public Administration and Theory 22: 289-317

Events and Submissions/Topic

In deciding to contract key services previously delivered by government to the private sector, motivations and underlying approaches to delivery need to be considered. Friedman’s brief article, famous for its clarity and polemic, highlights at least some of the challenges that ‘contracting out’ involves. Students will gain a more nuanced understanding of what is to be considered – not to reject, perhaps, but to see more clearly the price and consequences.

Week 9 Begin Date: 11 May 2020

Module/Topic

Contracting to the not-for-profit sector

Chapter

Ohlin, J. 1997-98. Will privatisation and contracting out deliver community services? Research Paper 15, Parliamentary Library, Canberra.

 Jang, H. S. 2006. Contracting out local government services to nonprofit organizations. PhD, Florida State University, College of Social Science. pdf open access.

 

Butcher, J. R. 2017. Not-for-profits must adapt as one arm of government’s ‘three-sector solutions’. The Conversation, 24 March.

 Bennett, J., & Iossa, E. 2007. Contracting out public service provision to not-for-profit firms. Available at SSRN: https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=1018206

Events and Submissions/Topic

Individual written assignment 2 Due: Week 9 Monday (11 May 2020) 11:55 pm AEST
Week 10 Begin Date: 18 May 2020

Module/Topic

Accountability in administration and accountability to citizens

Chapter

Schillemans, T. 2008. Accountability in the shadow of hierarchy: The horizontal accountability of agencies. Public Organization Review 8: 175-194.

 Kenney, C.D. 1999 (draft paper). 1999. Reflections on horizontal accountability: Democratic legitimacy, majority parties and democratic stability in Latin America. Institutions, Accountability, and Democratic Governance in Latin America (Conference), University of Notre Dame 8-9 May 2000.

 

Haque, M. S. 1997. Local governance in developing nations: Reexamining the question of accountability. Regional Development Dialogue 18(2): iii-xxiii.

 O’Flynn, J. 2011. Post-bureaucratic, post-competitive government: Can a public value perspective provide the way forward? University of Canberra, via

https://crawford.anu.edu.au/pdf/staff/janine_oflynn/OFLYNN%202006%20 EFMD%20Public%20Value.pdf

Events and Submissions/Topic

Considering Haque’s paper, and its date, we might ask how far we have moved in accountability.

Week 11 Begin Date: 25 May 2020

Module/Topic

Government, Governance and Administration

Chapter

Stoker, G. 2006. Public value management: A new narrative for networked governance? American Review of Public Administration 36(1): 41-57.

De Graaf, G., Huberts, L., & Smulders, R. 2016. Coping with public value conflicts. Administration & Society 48(9): 1101-1127.

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 12 Begin Date: 01 Jun 2020

Module/Topic

Presentations and Reflection

Chapter

Events and Submissions/Topic

Students will present their project-cases as the third assessment component.


Group presentation Due: Week 12 Monday (1 June 2020) 5:00 pm AEST
Review/Exam Week Begin Date: 08 Jun 2020

Module/Topic

Chapter

Events and Submissions/Topic

Exam Week Begin Date: 15 Jun 2020

Module/Topic

Chapter

Events and Submissions/Topic

Assessment Tasks

1 Research Assignment

Assessment Title
Individual written assignment 1

Task Description

What have been the principal rationales for trends in public sector reforms? How effective do you think those reforms have been? 

Task description

In your view, what have been the principal rationales for trends in public sector reforms? How effective do you think those reforms have been? You may select cases with which you are familiar, and choose any jurisdiction where there has been a program of public sector reform, and over any time period.

You can select some reform initiatives and critically discuss to argue your points of view.

You are required to provide a good structure and sequential analysis.

You are required to use minimum16 references (Journal articles, books, government reports etc.)


Assessment Due Date

Week 5 Monday (6 Apr 2020) 11:55 pm AEST


Return Date to Students

Week 6 Monday (20 Apr 2020)


Weighting
40%

Assessment Criteria

Understanding of public administration theories and concepts

Ability to analyse the factors that influence the public sector reforms.

Critical analysis of the impacts of selected reforms on public sector management practices

Develop your arguments with evidence

You are required to provide a good structure and sequential analysis.

You are required to use minimum16 references (Journal articles, books, government reports etc.


Submission
Online

Learning Outcomes Assessed
  • Identify, analyse, and apply the knowledge, skills and abilities required by public sector managers
  • Examine the functions and operations of public administration organisations


Graduate Attributes
  • Knowledge
  • Communication
  • Cognitive, technical and creative skills
  • Research

2 Research Assignment

Assessment Title
Individual written assignment 2

Task Description

Topic: From your reading and/or experience, what knowledge, skills and abilities do you believe are required by public sector managers? Justify your selection, using illustrative cases of functions and operations, and also justify the priority order you do (or do not) wish to assign to these.

Task description

In the context of shifts in paradigm, what knowledge, skills, and abilities do you believe are required by public sector managers to be an effective public administrator?

Justify your selection, using illustrative cases of functions and operations,

Justify the priority order you do (or do not) wish to assign to these.

You are required to do conduct online research to collect information from published government documents, consultancy reports, journal articles, and books.

.


Assessment Due Date

Week 9 Monday (11 May 2020) 11:55 pm AEST


Return Date to Students

Week 10 Monday (18 May 2020)


Weighting
40%

Assessment Criteria

Understanding of various paradigms and the reasons for shifts.

Ability to identify the knowledge, skills, and abilities public managers are required to be an effective public administrator.

Use of relevant illustrative cases

Analyse functions and operations of modern public administration systems,

Conduct online research to collect information from published government documents, consultancy reports, journal articles, and books.

Develop your arguments with evidence

Provide a good structure and sequential analysis.

You are required to use minimum16 references (Journal articles, books, government reports, etc.


Submission
Online

Learning Outcomes Assessed
  • Assess the rationale and effectiveness of public sector reforms
  • Demonstrate advanced knowledge and skills required to effectively manage across the public, private and not for profit sectors.


Graduate Attributes
  • Knowledge
  • Cognitive, technical and creative skills
  • Research
  • Ethical and Professional Responsibility

3 Presentation

Assessment Title
Group presentation

Task Description

Task description

Assignment 3 requires you to do a group presentation at the class in Week 12.

For this the assignment you will present your case orally, using notes or a script (if you wish), with the option of any aids, charts or PowerPoint presentation you also wish to use. The presentation should take no longer than 15 minutes.

Topic: Selecting an area or case that is part of public administration, present a case for managing that area effectively in either the public or not for profit sector, drawing on your learning in the unit.


Assessment Due Date

Week 12 Monday (1 June 2020) 5:00 pm AEST


Return Date to Students

Exam Week Monday (15 June 2020)


Weighting
20%

Assessment Criteria

You are required to make a 20-minute presentation.

Well structured  

Arguments with evidence

Use of public administration theories and concepts in analysing issues.

Reflection on your ability to prepare a research-based presentation.




Submission
Online Group

Learning Outcomes Assessed
  • Identify, analyse, and apply the knowledge, skills and abilities required by public sector managers
  • Demonstrate advanced knowledge and skills required to effectively manage across the public, private and not for profit sectors.


Graduate Attributes
  • Knowledge
  • Communication
  • Self-management
  • Leadership

Academic Integrity Statement

As a CQUniversity student you are expected to act honestly in all aspects of your academic work.

Any assessable work undertaken or submitted for review or assessment must be your own work. Assessable work is any type of work you do to meet the assessment requirements in the unit, including draft work submitted for review and feedback and final work to be assessed.

When you use the ideas, words or data of others in your assessment, you must thoroughly and clearly acknowledge the source of this information by using the correct referencing style for your unit. Using others’ work without proper acknowledgement may be considered a form of intellectual dishonesty.

Participating honestly, respectfully, responsibly, and fairly in your university study ensures the CQUniversity qualification you earn will be valued as a true indication of your individual academic achievement and will continue to receive the respect and recognition it deserves.

As a student, you are responsible for reading and following CQUniversity’s policies, including the Student Academic Integrity Policy and Procedure. This policy sets out CQUniversity’s expectations of you to act with integrity, examples of academic integrity breaches to avoid, the processes used to address alleged breaches of academic integrity, and potential penalties.

What is a breach of academic integrity?

A breach of academic integrity includes but is not limited to plagiarism, self-plagiarism, collusion, cheating, contract cheating, and academic misconduct. The Student Academic Integrity Policy and Procedure defines what these terms mean and gives examples.

Why is academic integrity important?

A breach of academic integrity may result in one or more penalties, including suspension or even expulsion from the University. It can also have negative implications for student visas and future enrolment at CQUniversity or elsewhere. Students who engage in contract cheating also risk being blackmailed by contract cheating services.

Where can I get assistance?

For academic advice and guidance, the Academic Learning Centre (ALC) can support you in becoming confident in completing assessments with integrity and of high standard.

What can you do to act with integrity?