CQUniversity Unit Profile
PSYC12014 Critical, Cultural and Social Psychology
Critical, Cultural and Social Psychology
All details in this unit profile for PSYC12014 have been officially approved by CQUniversity and represent a learning partnership between the University and you (our student).
The information will not be changed unless absolutely necessary and any change will be clearly indicated by an approved correction included in the profile.
General Information

Overview

In this unit you will explore the key social psychological concepts of the social self, prejudice, attitudes and attitude change, conformity, aggression, helping and relationships, with a specific focus on cultural, sexual, ability and gender diversity. You will explore concepts such as the social self from both mainstream and diverse perspectives, including that of Aboriginal Australians. You will build on the academic research and writing skills from your foundation units. You will develop your understanding of yourself and others, with the broader goal of greater inclusiveness. You will develop knowledge that will assist you to work respectfully with diverse clients and to undertake research that is ethical, inclusive and makes a difference in people's lives.

Details

Career Level: Undergraduate
Unit Level: Level 2
Credit Points: 6
Student Contribution Band: 10
Fraction of Full-Time Student Load: 0.125

Pre-requisites or Co-requisites

Pre-requisites: successful completion of 36 unspecified credit points

Important note: Students enrolled in a subsequent unit who failed their pre-requisite unit, should drop the subsequent unit before the census date or within 10 working days of Fail grade notification. Students who do not drop the unit in this timeframe cannot later drop the unit without academic and financial liability. See details in the Assessment Policy and Procedure (Higher Education Coursework).

Offerings For Term 3 - 2020

Online

Attendance Requirements

All on-campus students are expected to attend scheduled classes – in some units, these classes are identified as a mandatory (pass/fail) component and attendance is compulsory. International students, on a student visa, must maintain a full time study load and meet both attendance and academic progress requirements in each study period (satisfactory attendance for International students is defined as maintaining at least an 80% attendance record).

Class and Assessment Overview

Recommended Student Time Commitment

Each 6-credit Undergraduate unit at CQUniversity requires an overall time commitment of an average of 12.5 hours of study per week, making a total of 150 hours for the unit.

Class Timetable

Bundaberg, Cairns, Emerald, Gladstone, Mackay, Rockhampton, Townsville
Adelaide, Brisbane, Melbourne, Perth, Sydney

Assessment Overview

1. Critical Review
Weighting: 20%
2. Learning logs / diaries / Journal / log books
Weighting: 30%
3. Written Assessment
Weighting: 50%

Assessment Grading

This is a graded unit: your overall grade will be calculated from the marks or grades for each assessment task, based on the relative weightings shown in the table above. You must obtain an overall mark for the unit of at least 50%, or an overall grade of ‘pass’ in order to pass the unit. If any ‘pass/fail’ tasks are shown in the table above they must also be completed successfully (‘pass’ grade). You must also meet any minimum mark requirements specified for a particular assessment task, as detailed in the ‘assessment task’ section (note that in some instances, the minimum mark for a task may be greater than 50%). Consult the University’s Grades and Results Policy for more details of interim results and final grades.

Previous Student Feedback

Feedback, Recommendations and Responses

Every unit is reviewed for enhancement each year. At the most recent review, the following staff and student feedback items were identified and recommendations were made.

Feedback from Peer review and student feedback (formal unit evaluation).

Feedback

The video recording of tutorials did not provide a good experience for students as much of the tutorial was based on small group activities taking place in breakout rooms and this did not translate well in the video recording - the recording could only take place in one zoom meeting room.

Recommendation

The tutorials will not be recorded as the format of tutorials (small group activities) is inappropriate for recording with the existing technology available and students will be more strongly advised to attend tutorials.

Feedback from Peer review and student feedback (informal).

Feedback

Students found tutorial activities engaging.

Recommendation

Continue using tutorial activities from 2020 to engage students on the unit. Continue to build on those activities to introduce further innovation in teaching and learning practice in tutorials in future years.

Unit Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this unit, you will be able to:
  1. Articulate social and cultural psychology concepts from both mainstream and diverse perspectives.
  2. Identify and describe the sociocultural and international contexts that influence individual differences in beliefs, values, and behaviour
  3. Critically reflect upon and evaluate social psychological concepts, research and theories
  4. Recognise how privilege, power, and oppression affects prejudice, discrimination, and inequity

These learning outcomes reflect the Graduate Attributes of the Australian Undergraduate Psychology Program.

Alignment of Learning Outcomes, Assessment and Graduate Attributes
N/A Level
Introductory Level
Intermediate Level
Graduate Level
Professional Level
Advanced Level

Alignment of Assessment Tasks to Learning Outcomes

Assessment Tasks Learning Outcomes
1 2 3 4
1 - Critical Review - 20%
2 - Learning logs / diaries / Journal / log books - 30%
3 - Written Assessment - 50%

Alignment of Graduate Attributes to Learning Outcomes

Graduate Attributes Learning Outcomes
1 2 3 4
1 - Communication
2 - Problem Solving
3 - Critical Thinking
4 - Information Literacy
5 - Team Work
6 - Information Technology Competence
7 - Cross Cultural Competence
8 - Ethical practice
9 - Social Innovation

Alignment of Assessment Tasks to Graduate Attributes

Assessment Tasks Graduate Attributes
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
1 - Critical Review - 20%
2 - Learning logs / diaries / Journal / log books - 30%
3 - Written Assessment - 50%
Textbooks and Resources

Textbooks

Prescribed

Social Psychology: Australian and New Zealand 1st (2015)

Authors: Kassin, S., Fein, S., Marksu, H.R., McBain, K.A., Williams, L.A.
Cengage Learning Australia
Melbourne Melbourne , Victoria , Australia
ISBN: 978113395775 1
Binding: eBook

Additional Textbook Information

The first edition is no longer in print, students will either have to source second hand copies or an eBook.

IT Resources

You will need access to the following IT resources:
  • CQUniversity Student Email
  • Internet
  • Unit Website (Moodle)
Referencing Style

All submissions for this unit must use the referencing style: American Psychological Association 7th Edition (APA 7th edition)

For further information, see the Assessment Tasks.

Teaching Contacts
Janene Dravsnik Unit Coordinator
j.dravsnik@cqu.edu.au
Schedule
Week 1 Begin Date: 09 Nov 2020

Module/Topic

Critical Cultural and Social Psychology.

Chapter

Chapter 1 of Prescribed Text.

Selected reading provided on Moodle.

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 2 Begin Date: 16 Nov 2020

Module/Topic

Study support for Assessment 1.

Chapter

Read information on Assessment 1.

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 3 Begin Date: 23 Nov 2020

Module/Topic

The social self.

Chapter

Chapter 2 of prescribed text.

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 4 Begin Date: 30 Nov 2020

Module/Topic

Disabled people.

Chapter

Selected reading provided on Moodle.

Events and Submissions/Topic

Vacation Week Begin Date: 07 Dec 2020

Module/Topic

Chapter

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 5 Begin Date: 14 Dec 2020

Module/Topic

Mentally ill people.

Chapter

Selected reading provided on Moodle.

Events and Submissions/Topic

Assessment 1 Due



Critical Review of a Seminal Research Paper Due: Week 5 Monday (14 Dec 2020) 9:00 am AEST
Week 6 Begin Date: 21 Dec 2020

Module/Topic

Stereotypes, prejudice and discrimination.

Chapter

Chapter 4 of Prescribed Text.

Events and Submissions/Topic

Vacation Week Begin Date: 28 Dec 2020

Module/Topic

Chapter

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 7 Begin Date: 04 Jan 2021

Module/Topic

Social influence.

Chapter

Chapter 6 of prescribed text.

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 8 Begin Date: 11 Jan 2021

Module/Topic

Gender and sexuality.

Chapter

Chapter 8 of the prescribed text.

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 9 Begin Date: 18 Jan 2021

Module/Topic

Social relations

Chapter

Chapters 9 and 10 of prescribed text.

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 10 Begin Date: 25 Jan 2021

Module/Topic

Relationships: Aboriginal perspectives and experiences

Chapter

Selected reading provided on Moodle.

Events and Submissions/Topic

Assessment 2 Due



Critical Reflexive Learning Diary Due: Week 10 Monday (25 Jan 2021) 9:00 am AEST
Week 11 Begin Date: 01 Feb 2021

Module/Topic

Critical community psychology.

Chapter

Reading from Ch 12 of prescribed text with supplementary reading provided on Moodle.

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 12 Begin Date: 08 Feb 2021

Module/Topic

Study support for Assessment 3.

Chapter

Continue working on assessment 3.

Events and Submissions/Topic

Assessment 3 Due


Critical Essay Due: Week 12 Wednesday (10 Feb 2021) 5:00 pm AEST
Assessment Tasks

1 Critical Review

Assessment Title
Critical Review of a Seminal Research Paper

Task Description

In the 1970s, a seminal experiment in the United States of America by David Rosenhan shocked the professions of psychology and psychiatry. It was a paper that asked a penetrating question in relation to ideas around mental illness. It caused a strong reaction and lots of controversy. The paper helped to accelerate the reform of psychiatric institutions and the deinsitutionalisation of mental patients during the 1970s and 1980s. For this assessment, you will write a review of the Rosenhan paper and discuss the controversies that it has created, the challenges it has made to psychology’s notions of mental illness and to consider the implications of the experiment for modern day psychology. You will be asked to adopt a critical, cultural position in your review and thus write it as a critical commentary on contemporary psychological theory and practice.

Your review will contain two main sections. The first section will be a brief summary of the Rosenhan paper and a summary of published reactions to that paper. This will involve you undertaking your own search of the literature to find relevant academic texts that have responded to the Rosenhan paper. As a guideline, you should aim to include at least three papers in addition to the original Rosenhan paper. These do not have to be recent publications, but do need to be papers published in academic peer reviewed psychology journals. This first section should be no more than 400 words in length. The second section will be your own review of the Rosenhan paper that focuses on the challenges and implications of that paper for contemporary psychological theory and practice and draws on social psychological theories of the self. The second section of the assignment does not require citations to the literature unless you are citing knowledge that is beyond your own experience or other than your own thinking. You should aim to keep the focus on your own thoughts in this section. This second section should be no more than 400 words in length.

  • The length of the assessment must not exceed 800 words.
  • Text should be word-processed and follow the APA style for layout.
  • Use Arial font and double spacing.
  • You must include a reference section at the end of the assessment. Referencing and citations should be in the APA format.


Assessment Due Date

Week 5 Monday (14 Dec 2020) 9:00 am AEST

AEST


Return Date to Students

Week 7 Monday (4 Jan 2021)

AEST


Weighting
20%

Assessment Criteria

The full marking criteria will be in the form of a detailed marking rubric available on the Moodle site. The criteria reflected in that rubric will be on how well you articulate theories of self and other from both a mainstream and a critical, cultural perspective and how well you critically reflect on your own views of the controversies around the concept of mental illness. You will also be marked based on criteria related to your communication skills, critical thinking skills and research skills. So, you will be assessed on your ability to effectively and critically present a coherent argument and critical analysis on the concept of mental illness and on how well you navigate and codify the complex research literature on mental illness.


Referencing Style

Submission
Online

Submission Instructions
Submissions must be in Microsoft Word format. Other file types will not be accepted. Submission must be to the assessment submission box on the unit's Moodle site. Only submit one document. Name your file: "Your First Name_Your Second Name_PSYC12014_A1".

Learning Outcomes Assessed
  • Articulate social and cultural psychology concepts from both mainstream and diverse perspectives.
  • Critically reflect upon and evaluate social psychological concepts, research and theories


Graduate Attributes
  • Communication
  • Critical Thinking
  • Information Literacy

2 Learning logs / diaries / Journal / log books

Assessment Title
Critical Reflexive Learning Diary

Task Description

Social psychology is an area of the discipline of psychology which offers us the opportunity to adopt a more subjective, reflexive relationship to theory and practice. In Critical, Cultural Social Psychology the objective, neutral stance of the psychologist is rejected in favour of a subjective, partisan stance. Assessment Two offers you an opportunity to develop or re-engage with those reflexive skills through the practice of diary keeping. Reflexivity is different from reflectivity. Reflective means thinking about one’s thoughts, feelings and actions. Reflexive means thinking about one’s own thoughts, feelings and actions through the eyes of another. For this assessment, you will engage with reflexivity through the eyes of the various writers whose work we will discuss during the unit.

For the first eight teaching weeks, you should keep a weekly diary of your learning. The diary will contain two sections. In the first section you should summarise your learning from that particular week (e.g., week 1) in the form of a summary of the ideas contained in the teaching videos, content covered by any required reading and the topics discussed during the online tutorial for that week. This should be a concise summary and be no longer than 125 words.

The second section will be your critical reflexions on that material in relation to what you learned about the role of social cultural factors in psychology, how your understanding of social support and social power has either been consolidated or changed during that week and what dilemmas or inconsistencies you have identified in your understanding of psychology’s approach to particular social issues. You should approach this task as an exercise of considering your own thoughts, feelings and actions through the perspective of the different approaches we cover that week. This section should be no longer than 275 words.

Once you have completed eight weeks of diary entries (one entry per week for the first eight teaching weeks), you will choose the two diary entries that you feel best meet the marking criteria. Pick you best work and submit those two diary entries in one document. The other six logs should be included as a appendix to that document, but will not be assessed. The length of the assessment must not exceed 800 words.

  • Text should be word-processed and follow the APA style for layout.
  • Use Arial font and double spacing.
  • You must include a reference section at the end of the assessment. Referencing and citations should be in the APA format


Assessment Due Date

Week 10 Monday (25 Jan 2021) 9:00 am AEST

AEST


Return Date to Students

Week 12 Monday (8 Feb 2021)

AEST


Weighting
30%

Assessment Criteria

The marking criteria will be in the form of a detailed marking rubric available on the Moodle site. The criteria laid out in the rubric will assess you on how well you are able to: identify and describe the socio-cultural contexts that impact two key areas of social psychological enquiry; recognise how privilege, power and oppression impact upon the social practices of prejudice and discrimination and the social context of inequity; identify the personal dilemmas you face and inconsistencies of beliefs you have in relation to social psychological topics and how well you think through possible resolutions for these; and, attain knowledge about key social psychological concepts by sifting and sorting through complex areas of the research literature.


Referencing Style

Submission
Online

Submission Instructions
Submissions must be in Microsoft Word format. Other file types will not be accepted. Only submit one document (containing the two diary entries). Name your file: "Your First Name_Your Second Name_PSYC12014_A2."

Learning Outcomes Assessed
  • Identify and describe the sociocultural and international contexts that influence individual differences in beliefs, values, and behaviour
  • Recognise how privilege, power, and oppression affects prejudice, discrimination, and inequity


Graduate Attributes
  • Problem Solving
  • Information Literacy

3 Written Assessment

Assessment Title
Critical Essay

Task Description

Essay writing has been one of the key skills used by critical social commentators. It is the medium that offers you the opportunity to fully engage with and communicate your critical thinking on important social issues. Throughout history, skilled essayist have been among the most important agents of social change. They are able to combine literary skills with research skills to produce written texts that can create sufficient social and political ruptures to enable progressive social change. For example, the writings of Gore Vidal have influenced the peace movement, James Baldwin’s writing influenced the black civil right movement, Simone de Beauvoir influenced the women’s movement and so on. So, be inspired by the prospect of writing an essay, don’t be daunted by it.

Once you become skilled at essay writing it can become a means for you to find your ‘academic voice’ – a style of argument that both conforms to the conventions of academic practice but also has a unique quality that reflects your disposition, your life experiences and your particular way of seeing the world. The convention that you will follow will be to: cite evidence to support your arguments; provide citations and references to the literature from where that evidence comes; structure your essay with an introduction, main text body and conclusion (no abstract required); and, to identify and defend against the counter arguments and counter claims that are made in relation to your own arguments and claims.

Your voice comes through with the way you express your ideas. The more you stay away from citing too many long quotes and the less you paraphrase the work of others, the more space you will have to hone your skills and develop your own writing style.

For this assignment you will be given an essay title and a choice of three essay topics: Disability or Mental Illness or Indigenous Issues. The length of the assessment must not exceed 1200 words.

  • Text should be word-processed and follow the APA style for layout.
  • Use Arial font and double spacing.
  • You must include a reference section at the end of the assessment. Referencing and citations should be in the APA format.


Assessment Due Date

Week 12 Wednesday (10 Feb 2021) 5:00 pm AEST

AEST


Return Date to Students

Weighting
50%

Assessment Criteria

With this being the main piece of assessment, the marking criteria will cover all of the unit’s planned learning outcomes. The marking criteria will be in the form of a detailed marking rubric available on the Moodle site. The criteria laid out in the rubric will assess you on how well you are able to cover both mainstream and diverse perspectives in your essay, to reflexively describe how sociocultural and international contexts impact those perspectives, to evaluate the usefulness of particular social psychological ideas and to map out the way social power impacts social phenomena. There will not be a separate marking criterion related to your written expression (such as the clarity of your writing and your avoidance of spelling and grammatical errors), but implicit to each element of the marking criteria will be an assessment of your writing skills. I.e., if you present an idea poorly because of writing errors, you will not pick up as many marks as you would if you were to present that same idea well written.


Referencing Style

Submission
Online

Submission Instructions
Submissions must be in Microsoft Word format. Other file types will not be accepted. Only submit one document. Name your file: "Your First Name_Your Second Name_PSYC12014_A3".

Learning Outcomes Assessed
  • Articulate social and cultural psychology concepts from both mainstream and diverse perspectives.
  • Identify and describe the sociocultural and international contexts that influence individual differences in beliefs, values, and behaviour
  • Critically reflect upon and evaluate social psychological concepts, research and theories
  • Recognise how privilege, power, and oppression affects prejudice, discrimination, and inequity


Graduate Attributes
  • Communication
  • Critical Thinking
  • Information Literacy

Academic Integrity Statement

As a CQUniversity student you are expected to act honestly in all aspects of your academic work.

Any assessable work undertaken or submitted for review or assessment must be your own work. Assessable work is any type of work you do to meet the assessment requirements in the unit, including draft work submitted for review and feedback and final work to be assessed.

When you use the ideas, words or data of others in your assessment, you must thoroughly and clearly acknowledge the source of this information by using the correct referencing style for your unit. Using others’ work without proper acknowledgement may be considered a form of intellectual dishonesty.

Participating honestly, respectfully, responsibly, and fairly in your university study ensures the CQUniversity qualification you earn will be valued as a true indication of your individual academic achievement and will continue to receive the respect and recognition it deserves.

As a student, you are responsible for reading and following CQUniversity’s policies, including the Student Academic Integrity Policy and Procedure. This policy sets out CQUniversity’s expectations of you to act with integrity, examples of academic integrity breaches to avoid, the processes used to address alleged breaches of academic integrity, and potential penalties.

What is a breach of academic integrity?

A breach of academic integrity includes but is not limited to plagiarism, self-plagiarism, collusion, cheating, contract cheating, and academic misconduct. The Student Academic Integrity Policy and Procedure defines what these terms mean and gives examples.

Why is academic integrity important?

A breach of academic integrity may result in one or more penalties, including suspension or even expulsion from the University. It can also have negative implications for student visas and future enrolment at CQUniversity or elsewhere. Students who engage in contract cheating also risk being blackmailed by contract cheating services.

What can you do to act with integrity?

Where can I get assistance?

For academic advice and guidance, the Academic Learning Centre (ALC) can support you in becoming confident in completing assessments with integrity and of high standard.