CQUniversity Unit Profile
SOCL11055 Sociology of Australian Society
Sociology of Australian Society
All details in this unit profile for SOCL11055 have been officially approved by CQUniversity and represent a learning partnership between the University and you (our student).
The information will not be changed unless absolutely necessary and any change will be clearly indicated by an approved correction included in the profile.
General Information

Overview

Sociology is a distinctive way of critically understanding the social forces that shape the self, Australia and the world - whatever professional paths you take. This unit will enable you to start thinking critically about Australian society, your place in it as part of an increasingly diverse and globalising world. It will help you to develop a deeper understanding of the underlying social forces that shape social inequality and individual autonomy using critical thinking and reflective practice

Details

Career Level: Undergraduate
Unit Level: Level 1
Credit Points: 6
Student Contribution Band: 10
Fraction of Full-Time Student Load: 0.125

Pre-requisites or Co-requisites

There are no requisites for this unit.

Important note: Students enrolled in a subsequent unit who failed their pre-requisite unit, should drop the subsequent unit before the census date or within 10 working days of Fail grade notification. Students who do not drop the unit in this timeframe cannot later drop the unit without academic and financial liability. See details in the Assessment Policy and Procedure (Higher Education Coursework).

Offerings For Term 1 - 2018

Distance

Attendance Requirements

All on-campus students are expected to attend scheduled classes – in some units, these classes are identified as a mandatory (pass/fail) component and attendance is compulsory. International students, on a student visa, must maintain a full time study load and meet both attendance and academic progress requirements in each study period (satisfactory attendance for International students is defined as maintaining at least an 80% attendance record).

Class and Assessment Overview

Recommended Student Time Commitment

Each 6-credit Undergraduate unit at CQUniversity requires an overall time commitment of an average of 12.5 hours of study per week, making a total of 150 hours for the unit.

Class Timetable

Bundaberg, Cairns, Emerald, Gladstone, Mackay, Rockhampton, Townsville
Adelaide, Brisbane, Melbourne, Perth, Sydney

Assessment Overview

1. Online Quiz(zes)
Weighting: 25%
2. Written Assessment
Weighting: 25%
3. Written Assessment
Weighting: 50%

Assessment Grading

This is a graded unit: your overall grade will be calculated from the marks or grades for each assessment task, based on the relative weightings shown in the table above. You must obtain an overall mark for the unit of at least 50%, or an overall grade of ‘pass’ in order to pass the unit. If any ‘pass/fail’ tasks are shown in the table above they must also be completed successfully (‘pass’ grade). You must also meet any minimum mark requirements specified for a particular assessment task, as detailed in the ‘assessment task’ section (note that in some instances, the minimum mark for a task may be greater than 50%). Consult the University’s Grades and Results Policy for more details of interim results and final grades.

Previous Student Feedback

Feedback, Recommendations and Responses

Every unit is reviewed for enhancement each year. At the most recent review, the following staff and student feedback items were identified and recommendations were made.

Feedback from Moodle

Feedback

More detailed feedback from markers would be useful

Recommendation

Introduce a more formal procedure with markers elaborating expectations about feedback. Also offer students who request it extra feedback from lecturer,

Unit Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this unit, you will be able to:
  1. Explain the interactions between self and Australian society in a broad historical, cultural and social-structural context.
  2. Apply sociological frameworks to major forms of social inequality in Australia in global context, such as class, race and gender.
  3. Define basic sociological concepts.
Alignment of Learning Outcomes, Assessment and Graduate Attributes
N/A Level
Introductory Level
Intermediate Level
Graduate Level
Professional Level
Advanced Level

Alignment of Assessment Tasks to Learning Outcomes

Assessment Tasks Learning Outcomes
1 2 3
1 - Online Quiz(zes) - 25%
2 - Written Assessment - 25%
3 - Written Assessment - 50%

Alignment of Graduate Attributes to Learning Outcomes

Graduate Attributes Learning Outcomes
1 2 3
1 - Communication
2 - Problem Solving
3 - Critical Thinking
4 - Information Literacy
5 - Team Work
6 - Information Technology Competence
7 - Cross Cultural Competence
8 - Ethical practice
9 - Social Innovation

Alignment of Assessment Tasks to Graduate Attributes

Assessment Tasks Graduate Attributes
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
1 - Online Quiz(zes) - 25%
2 - Written Assessment - 25%
3 - Written Assessment - 50%
Textbooks and Resources

Textbooks

Prescribed

Introducing Sociology Using the Stuff of Everyday Life (2017)

Authors: Josee Johnston, Kate Cairns, Shyon Baumann
Routledge
United States
ISBN:
Binding: Other

Additional Textbook Information


IT Resources

You will need access to the following IT resources:
  • CQUniversity Student Email
  • Internet
  • Unit Website (Moodle)
Referencing Style

All submissions for this unit must use the referencing style: Harvard (author-date)

For further information, see the Assessment Tasks.

Teaching Contacts
Shane Hopkinson Unit Coordinator
s.hopkinson@cqu.edu.au
Schedule
Week 1 Begin Date: 05 Mar 2018

Module/Topic

Your sociological imagination I: Material factors  & History

Chapter

Textbook: Johnston et al 2017 
Chapter 1: A Day in the life of your jeans: using stuff to discover sociology

Willis Chapter 1 Introduction CRO

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 2 Begin Date: 12 Mar 2018

Module/Topic

Your sociological imagination II: Cultural factors & Identity

Chapter

Textbook: Johnston et al 2017
Chapter 2: You are what you eat: culture norms and value

Willis Chapter 4 Sociological Imagination CRO

Events and Submissions/Topic

 

Week 3 Begin Date: 19 Mar 2018

Module/Topic

Doing Social Research

Chapter

Textbook: Johnston et al 2017
Appendix: Advertising & Society - an overview of sociological methods

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 4 Begin Date: 26 Mar 2018

Module/Topic

Social Structures I: Class & Capitalism

Chapter

Textbook: Johnston et al 2017 
Chapter 3: Fast Food Blues: Work in the global economy

Events and Submissions/Topic

20 Question MC QUIZ 1 (NB) THURSDAY (29th Mar 2018)  6am-10pm AEST

Week 5 Begin Date: 02 Apr 2018

Module/Topic

Social Structures II: Class & Culture


Chapter

Textbook: Johnston et al 2017 
Chapter 4: Coffee: Class, distinction and 'good' taste 
Chapter 5: Shopping Lessons: Consuming Social Order

Events and Submissions/Topic

Defining key concepts Due: Week 5 Friday (6 Apr 2018) 11:45 pm AEST
Vacation Week Begin Date: 09 Apr 2018

Module/Topic

Chapter


Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 6 Begin Date: 16 Apr 2018

Module/Topic

Social Structures II: "Race" and Nation

Chapter

Textbook: Johnston et al 2017
Chapter 6: Get in the Game: Race, Merit and Group Boundaries  
Chapter 12: What’s On Your Playlist? Subcultures, Racism, and Cultural Appropriation

Events and Submissions/Topic

 



 

Week 7 Begin Date: 23 Apr 2018

Module/Topic

Social Structures III:  Gender and Family 

Chapter

Textbook: Johnston et al 2017
Chapter 7: Barbies and Monster Trucks: Socialisation and “Doing Gender”
Chapter 8: Dreaming of a White Wedding: Marriage, Family, and Hetero-normativity

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 8 Begin Date: 30 Apr 2018

Module/Topic

 DNA and Identity - Are you really a viking?

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 9 Begin Date: 07 May 2018

Module/Topic

 Culture and Identity

Chapter

Textbook: Johnston et al 2017:
Chapter 9: I<3 My Phone: Technology and Social Networks
Chapter 10: Branding Your Unique Identity™: Consumer Culture and the Social Self

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 10 Begin Date: 14 May 2018

Module/Topic

  
 

Chapter

Textbook: Johnston et al 2017:
Chapter 11: Looking Good: Ideology, Intersectionality,and the Beauty Industry


Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 11 Begin Date: 21 May 2018

Module/Topic

 

Chapter

Textbook: Johnston et al 2017:
Chapter 13: Our Love–Hate Relationship with the Car: Masculinity, Industry, and Environmental Sustainability

Events and Submissions/Topic

 


Demonstrating your Sociological Imagination using your family tree Due: Week 11 Friday (25 May 2018) 11:45 pm AEST
Week 12 Begin Date: 28 May 2018

Module/Topic

Revision 

Chapter

TALK: Robert Jensen Lecture: White Supremacy, Patriarchy & Capitalism (URL)


Events and Submissions/Topic

30 Question MC QUIZ 2 FRIDAY (1st Jun 2018) 6am-10pm AEST

Review/Exam Week Begin Date: 04 Jun 2018

Module/Topic

Chapter

Events and Submissions/Topic

Exam Week Begin Date: 11 Jun 2018

Module/Topic

Chapter

Events and Submissions/Topic

Assessment Tasks

1 Online Quiz(zes)

Assessment Title
Two Online Quizzes Weeks 4 & 12

Task Description

There will be two quizzes with a total of 50 questions. You will be given one minute per question and each question is worth 0.5 mark. Each student's quiz will be slightly different as 50 questions are drawn from a larger database of questions. 

QUIZ 1 20 Questions in 20 minutes - at the end of Week 4 (ie THURSDAY before EASTER) will examine Textbook chapters for Weeks 1-3
QUIZ 2 30 Questions in 30 minutes - at the end of Week 12 (BEFORE the exam period) will examine Textbook chapters for Week 4-10


Number of Quizzes

2


Frequency of Quizzes

Other


Assessment Due Date

Quizzes will be available on last working day of Week 4 (Thurs. March 29th) and Week 12 (Friday June 1st) between 6am and 10pm


Return Date to Students

The online quiz is graded as it is completed. The results will be available when the quiz closes.


Weighting
25%

Minimum mark or grade
Must submit – you must submit this item to achieve a passing grade.

Assessment Criteria

Objectives
The quizzes are set to test your understanding of fundamental concepts, methods, perspectives and facts covered by the textbooks and lectures. Each covers the whole term’s work up to that point.

Details
These are a timed online quizzes that must be sat on the due date between the hours of 6 AM and 10 PM (Australian Eastern Standard Time). If there are timezone issues for you please contact me well in advance.

They will be delivered through the ‘Assessment’ section of the unit Moodle site, and will only become available on the due date. Students will need to have access to an Internet connection in order to complete the quiz. It is your responsibility to make time to sit the quiz on the due date, and to arrange for a reliable Internet connection. Before you take the quiz, make sure that you are ready (i.e. a proper revision has been done) and choose a time and computer/place with minimum distraction to sit for the quiz (i.e. do not have external disturbances from people, pets, etc).


Be conscious of the time limit while taking the quiz—make sure you have a clock in front of you, and note down your starting time. Do not wait until the last minute to complete the quiz as it will time out once the time limit is reached (i.e.at 10PM the quiz will close regardless of your start time).
.
There will be 2 quizzes with a total of 50 multiple choice questions. The first quiz will have 20 questions in 20 minutes and the second will have 30 questions in 30 minutes. There will be only one correct or best answer to each question, and you need to select the option corresponding to this answer. There are no penalties for incorrect answers. While you will be able to refer to the textbook or other resources while you are taking the quiz, you cannot afford to do this for every question because of the time limit. You need to have a good understanding of the unit content before taking the quiz. Each student will receive a customised quiz, chosen in random fashion from the test bank, so that collusion will not be possible.

Collusion or other forms of cheating are subject to academic misconduct procedures.

The presentation of questions is one page at a time with 5 questions per page. You must complete each page before you go on to the next one. Attempts to backtrack to previous pages are not allowed.

Example -
Q. Which theorist developed ‘power elite’ theory?
a. Robert Merton
b. Emile Durkheim
c. Erving Goffman
d. C. Wright Mills *

The correct answer is (d) C. Wright Mills—this is the one you need to tick.There will also be a mock quiz early in the term for you to gain some practice. Students who may have special difficulties in undertaking the quiz need to contact the unit coordinator as early as possible to make the necessary arrangements. NB These are quizzes and not EXAMS so they are not sat in the exam period.


Referencing Style

Submission
Online

Learning Outcomes Assessed
  • Define basic sociological concepts.


Graduate Attributes
  • Problem Solving
  • Critical Thinking
  • Information Technology Competence

2 Written Assessment

Assessment Title
Defining key concepts

Task Description

This is STEP 1 of the assessment of the research process and involves writing a 1000 (+/- 10%) word simplified research report demonstrating your understanding of the Sociological Imagination after the first half of the course.

This will involve you drafting the first part of your research report demonstrating that you can define key sociology concepts (class, race and gender) in relation to your self and presenting your preliminary draft of your family tree.



Assessment Due Date

Week 5 Friday (6 Apr 2018) 11:45 pm AEST


Return Date to Students

Week 8 Monday (30 Apr 2018)

Assessment items will be returned on Monday 2 weeks after submission


Weighting
25%

Minimum mark or grade
Must submit – you must submit this item to achieve a passing grade.

Assessment Criteria

Structure of DRAFT Research Report
INTRODUCTION: Briefly explain the concept of the Sociological Imagination
KEY CONCEPTS: Define race, class and gender in sociology terms in relation to your own life experience.
METHOD: Explain briefly the methods you used to collect evidence for your family tree.
RESULTS: Provide a preliminary diagram of your family tree.


It should follow the marking sheet available on Moodle and be adequately referenced and properly formatted.


Referencing Style

Submission
Online

Submission Instructions
Assignments to be submitted via the link on Moodle site

Learning Outcomes Assessed
  • Explain the interactions between self and Australian society in a broad historical, cultural and social-structural context.


Graduate Attributes
  • Communication
  • Critical Thinking
  • Information Literacy

3 Written Assessment

Assessment Title
Demonstrating your Sociological Imagination using your family tree

Task Description

This is STEP 2 of the assessment of the research process and involves writing a 1500 (+/- 10%) word simplified research report demonstrating your understanding of the Sociological Imagination based on your analysis of your family tree.

As per the concepts discussed throughout the term you will need to focus on the concepts of race/ethnicity, class and gender (and their intersections). You will also be able to use your research to reflect on historical and cultural changes over time.

You will also need to reflect on the difficulties you encountered as a researcher, particularly on the reliability of the evidence on which your family tree is based. You can also use it to demonstrate 'taking the position of the Other' by reflecting on the difficulties you might have encountered if you had (or have) Australian Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander family background.

You will need to have done the assigned readings and lectures to complete this task adequately but perhaps more important will be discussions with the lecturer and other students online.

It is expected that you will present your work in a profession and academic manner including accurate referencing.


Assessment Due Date

Week 11 Friday (25 May 2018) 11:45 pm AEST


Return Date to Students

Review/Exam Week Monday (4 June 2018)

Assessment items will be returned on Monday 2 weeks after submission


Weighting
50%

Minimum mark or grade
Must submit – you must submit this item to achieve a passing grade.

Assessment Criteria

Structure of Research Report
INTRODUCTION: Briefly explain the concept of the Sociological Imagination in relation to the overall significance of your findings. This may include defining of key terms.
METHOD: Explain briefly the methods you used to collect evidence for your family tree.
RESULTS: Provide a diagram of your family tree of at least 3 generations (i.e. your parents and grandparents as a minimum). The more you are able to do the easier it is to see patterns.
DISCUSSION: Apply the concept of the sociological imagination to your data as follows:
History: What historical changes have impacted on the history of your family?
Structure: What class, race/ethnicity and gender dynamics are evident in your family tree? Can you see how they intersect?
Cultural norms: What cultural norms or changes are most evident in your family tree? How do you think your cultural assumptions differ most from your ancestors?
CRITICAL REFLECTION:
Critique: What was the most challenging part of this research? Do you think it was useful in learning sociological research concepts?
Reflection: What problems might you have experienced if you were/are of Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander descent?
Presentation: It is expected that students will present their work in a professional manner - it should be clear and easy to read.

It should follow the marking sheet available on Moodle and be adequately referenced and properly formatted.


Referencing Style

Submission
Online

Submission Instructions
Assignments to be submitted via the link on Moodle site

Learning Outcomes Assessed
  • Apply sociological frameworks to major forms of social inequality in Australia in global context, such as class, race and gender.


Graduate Attributes
  • Communication
  • Problem Solving
  • Critical Thinking
  • Information Literacy

Academic Integrity Statement

As a CQUniversity student you are expected to act honestly in all aspects of your academic work.

Any assessable work undertaken or submitted for review or assessment must be your own work. Assessable work is any type of work you do to meet the assessment requirements in the unit, including draft work submitted for review and feedback and final work to be assessed.

When you use the ideas, words or data of others in your assessment, you must thoroughly and clearly acknowledge the source of this information by using the correct referencing style for your unit. Using others’ work without proper acknowledgement may be considered a form of intellectual dishonesty.

Participating honestly, respectfully, responsibly, and fairly in your university study ensures the CQUniversity qualification you earn will be valued as a true indication of your individual academic achievement and will continue to receive the respect and recognition it deserves.

As a student, you are responsible for reading and following CQUniversity’s policies, including the Student Academic Integrity Policy and Procedure. This policy sets out CQUniversity’s expectations of you to act with integrity, examples of academic integrity breaches to avoid, the processes used to address alleged breaches of academic integrity, and potential penalties.

What is a breach of academic integrity?

A breach of academic integrity includes but is not limited to plagiarism, self-plagiarism, collusion, cheating, contract cheating, and academic misconduct. The Student Academic Integrity Policy and Procedure defines what these terms mean and gives examples.

Why is academic integrity important?

A breach of academic integrity may result in one or more penalties, including suspension or even expulsion from the University. It can also have negative implications for student visas and future enrolment at CQUniversity or elsewhere. Students who engage in contract cheating also risk being blackmailed by contract cheating services.

Where can I get assistance?

For academic advice and guidance, the Academic Learning Centre (ALC) can support you in becoming confident in completing assessments with integrity and of high standard.

What can you do to act with integrity?