CQUniversity Unit Profile
SOCL11055 Sociology of Australian Society
Sociology of Australian Society
All details in this unit profile for SOCL11055 have been officially approved by CQUniversity and represent a learning partnership between the University and you (our student).
The information will not be changed unless absolutely necessary and any change will be clearly indicated by an approved correction included in the profile.
General Information

Overview

This unit provides you with an understanding of Australian society in an increasingly diverse and globalising world and how it has developed over time. It will examine how Australian history has helped to define Australian national identities. You will explore issues of power and social change and consider a range of social issues using sociological concepts. This will give you an understanding of the politico economic distribution of resources that shape social inequalities around culture, ethnicity, "race", gender and sexuality. You will develop an understanding of Australian Indigenous issues, processes of settlement and colonisation and multiculturalism and the implications of the globalisation of society. In this way the unit will be the basis for a professional career in human service and other workplaces.

Details

Career Level: Undergraduate
Unit Level: Level 1
Credit Points: 6
Student Contribution Band: 10
Fraction of Full-Time Student Load: 0.125

Pre-requisites or Co-requisites

There are no requisites for this unit.

Important note: Students enrolled in a subsequent unit who failed their pre-requisite unit, should drop the subsequent unit before the census date or within 10 working days of Fail grade notification. Students who do not drop the unit in this timeframe cannot later drop the unit without academic and financial liability. See details in the Assessment Policy and Procedure (Higher Education Coursework).

Offerings For Term 1 - 2020

Online

Attendance Requirements

All on-campus students are expected to attend scheduled classes – in some units, these classes are identified as a mandatory (pass/fail) component and attendance is compulsory. International students, on a student visa, must maintain a full time study load and meet both attendance and academic progress requirements in each study period (satisfactory attendance for International students is defined as maintaining at least an 80% attendance record).

Class and Assessment Overview

Recommended Student Time Commitment

Each 6-credit Undergraduate unit at CQUniversity requires an overall time commitment of an average of 12.5 hours of study per week, making a total of 150 hours for the unit.

Class Timetable

Bundaberg, Cairns, Emerald, Gladstone, Mackay, Rockhampton, Townsville
Adelaide, Brisbane, Melbourne, Perth, Sydney

Assessment Overview

1. Online Quiz(zes)
Weighting: 10%
2. Written Assessment
Weighting: 25%
3. Written Assessment
Weighting: 50%
4. Online Quiz(zes)
Weighting: 15%

Assessment Grading

This is a graded unit: your overall grade will be calculated from the marks or grades for each assessment task, based on the relative weightings shown in the table above. You must obtain an overall mark for the unit of at least 50%, or an overall grade of ‘pass’ in order to pass the unit. If any ‘pass/fail’ tasks are shown in the table above they must also be completed successfully (‘pass’ grade). You must also meet any minimum mark requirements specified for a particular assessment task, as detailed in the ‘assessment task’ section (note that in some instances, the minimum mark for a task may be greater than 50%). Consult the University’s Grades and Results Policy for more details of interim results and final grades.

Previous Student Feedback

Feedback, Recommendations and Responses

Every unit is reviewed for enhancement each year. At the most recent review, the following staff and student feedback items were identified and recommendations were made.

Feedback from Moodle

Feedback

There was a lot of confusion over the concept of a 'critical whiteness perspective' in the Unit Learning Outcomes as this is not covered in depth within the unit content but is a requirement in one of the assignments.

Recommendation

That this aspect of the unit be dropped as too complex for first year units.

Feedback from Moodle

Feedback

More care needs to be taken to update lecture slides if using them from previous years.

Recommendation

Will review lectures to keep content current

Feedback from Moodle

Feedback

I preferred the tutorial zoom sessions to the audio files of the lectures.

Recommendation

Will replace long-form lectures with shorter podcast style pieces

Unit Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this unit, you will be able to:
  1. Understand contemporary Australian society in a global context
  2. Identify the relevance of sociological concepts for developing professional identity
  3. Outline the role of cultural diversity in Australian history and identity
  4. Examine the role of colonialism and resistance in the lives of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People - both past and present.

 Nil

Alignment of Learning Outcomes, Assessment and Graduate Attributes
N/A Level
Introductory Level
Intermediate Level
Graduate Level
Professional Level
Advanced Level

Alignment of Assessment Tasks to Learning Outcomes

Assessment Tasks Learning Outcomes
1 2 3 4
1 - Online Quiz(zes) - 10%
2 - Written Assessment - 25%
3 - Written Assessment - 50%
4 - Online Quiz(zes) - 15%

Alignment of Graduate Attributes to Learning Outcomes

Graduate Attributes Learning Outcomes
1 2 3 4
1 - Communication
2 - Problem Solving
3 - Critical Thinking
4 - Information Literacy
5 - Team Work
6 - Information Technology Competence
7 - Cross Cultural Competence
8 - Ethical practice
9 - Social Innovation

Alignment of Assessment Tasks to Graduate Attributes

Assessment Tasks Graduate Attributes
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
1 - Online Quiz(zes) - 10%
2 - Written Assessment - 25%
3 - Written Assessment - 50%
4 - Online Quiz(zes) - 15%
Textbooks and Resources

Textbooks

Prescribed

The Sociological Quest; An introduction to the study of social life 5th (2011)

Authors: Evan Willis
Allen & Unwin
Crows Nest Crows Nest , NSW , Australia
ISBN:
Binding: Paperback

Additional Textbook Information

Copies are available for purchase at the CQUni Bookshop here: http://bookshop.cqu.edu.au (search on the Unit code)

IT Resources

You will need access to the following IT resources:
  • CQUniversity Student Email
  • Internet
  • Unit Website (Moodle)
Referencing Style

All submissions for this unit must use the referencing style: Harvard (author-date)

For further information, see the Assessment Tasks.

Teaching Contacts
Susan Rockloff Unit Coordinator
s.rockloff@cqu.edu.au
Schedule
Week 1 Begin Date: 09 Mar 2020

Module/Topic

Sociology, human services, systems and social innovation

Chapter

Textbook: Willis (2011) Ch. 1 Introduction & Ch. 2 Nature of Sociological Explanation

Hopkinson (2007) 'WTF is Sociology?'

Events and Submissions/Topic

Complete ichange module

Week 2 Begin Date: 16 Mar 2020

Module/Topic

Is sociology a science? Challenging appearances & the ideology of "common sense"

Chapter

Textbook: Willis (2011) Ch. 3 Sociology's place in the Academy

Babakiueria Indigenous Film (Kanopy) 

Events and Submissions/Topic

Complete Practice Quiz

Week 3 Begin Date: 23 Mar 2020

Module/Topic

The Sociological Imagination 1: History and Cultural Factors - roles & norms in capitalist society

Chapter

Textbook: Willis (2011) Ch. 4 Sociological Imagination

Lerner (1997) Rethinking the paradigm: race & class (CRO)

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 4 Begin Date: 30 Mar 2020

Module/Topic

The Sociological Imagination 2: Structure of capitalist society & Critique

Chapter

Textbook: Willis (2011) Ch. 5 Structure & Critique

Winton (2014) The 'C' word: thoughts about class in Australia

Events and Submissions/Topic

20 Question MC QUIZ 1 (Apr 4 2020) 6am-10pm


Timed Online Quiz 1 Due: Week 4 Friday (3 Apr 2020) 10:00 pm AEST
Week 5 Begin Date: 06 Apr 2020

Module/Topic

Biology as ideology - it it really in your DNA?

Chapter

Textbook: Willis (2011) Ch. 6 The Social and the Biological

Events and Submissions/Topic


Vacation Week Begin Date: 13 Apr 2020

Module/Topic

Chapter

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 6 Begin Date: 20 Apr 2020

Module/Topic

Social Structures 1: State, ideology & neo-liberal politics

Chapter

Political Compass Quiz (URL)

Wallerstein (2001) Ch. 1 The French Revolution as world-historical event (CRO)

Birch (2017) What exactly is neoliberalism? (URL)

Events and Submissions/Topic

Understanding the sociological imagination in human service work Due: Week 6 Friday (24 Apr 2020) 7:00 pm AEST
Week 7 Begin Date: 27 Apr 2020

Module/Topic

Social Structures 2: Class structure & capitalist globalisation

Chapter

Textbook: Willis (2011) Ch.7 Theory & Method Ch. 8 Doing Sociology

Wallerstein (1998) Heritage of Sociology

Walter & Saggers (2007) Poverty & Social Class (CRO)

Quiggan (1999) Globalisation, neoliberalism & Inequality in Australia

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 8 Begin Date: 04 May 2020

Module/Topic

Social Structures 3: Class & cultural norms

Chapter

Germov (2013) Imagining Health Problems as Social Issues (CRO)

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 9 Begin Date: 11 May 2020

Module/Topic

Social Structures 4 : The gender order & families

Chapter

Bessant & Watts (2007) Ourselves in Families (CRO)

Torres (2000) Indigenous Australian Women (CRO)

Transgender Basics [YouTube]

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 10 Begin Date: 18 May 2020

Module/Topic

Social Structures 5: Nation-state and "race": An imaginary community

Chapter

Craven & Price (2011) Misconceptions, stereotypes & racism (CRO)

Thompson (1994) The cult of disremembering (CRO)

Reverse Racism (stand up comedy) [YouTube]

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 11 Begin Date: 25 May 2020

Module/Topic

Cultural Norms: Moral panics - sex, drugs & deviance

Chapter

Hari Everything you think you know about addiction is wrong (URL)

Freij & Germov (2015) Sociology of licit and illicit drugs (CRO)

Events and Submissions/Topic

Understanding a social issues using the sociological imagination Due: Week 11 Friday (29 May 2020) 7:00 pm AEST
Week 12 Begin Date: 01 Jun 2020

Module/Topic

Intersectionality

Chapter

Events and Submissions/Topic

30 QUESTION MC QUIZ 2 Friday (Jun 5 2020) 6am-10pm


Timed Online Quiz 2 Due: Week 12 Friday (5 Jun 2020) 10:00 pm AEST
Review/Exam Week Begin Date: 08 Jun 2020

Module/Topic

Chapter

Events and Submissions/Topic

Exam Week Begin Date: 15 Jun 2020

Module/Topic

Chapter

Events and Submissions/Topic

Assessment Tasks

1 Online Quiz(zes)

Assessment Title
Timed Online Quiz 1

Task Description

This is the first of two multi-choice quizzes and contains 20 questions. You will be given one minute per question and each question is worth 0.5 marks. 


Number of Quizzes


Frequency of Quizzes

Other


Assessment Due Date

Week 4 Friday (3 Apr 2020) 10:00 pm AEST

Quizzes must be completed on the due date between 6AM and 10 PM


Return Date to Students

The online quiz is graded as it is completed. The results will be available when the overall quiz closes (i.e. the following day).


Weighting
10%

Minimum mark or grade
Must submit – you must submit all items to achieve a passing grade

Assessment Criteria

Objectives

The quizzes are set to test your understanding of fundamental concepts, methods, perspectives and facts covered by the textbooks and lectures. Each quiz covers the whole term’s work up to that point.

Details

These are a timed online quizzes that must be sat on the due date between the hours of 6 AM and 10 PM AEST. If there are time zone issues for you please contact me well in advance.

They will be delivered through the ‘Assessment’ section of the Moodle site, and will only become available on the due date. Students will need to have access to an Internet connection in order to complete the quiz. It is your responsibility to make time to sit the quiz on the due date, and to arrange for a reliable Internet connection. Before you take the quiz, make sure that you are ready (i.e. a proper revision has been done) and choose a time and computer/place with minimum distraction to sit for the quiz (i.e. do not have external disturbances from people, pets, etc).

Be conscious of the time limit while taking the quiz—make sure you have a clock in front of you, and note down your starting time. Do not wait until the last minute to complete the quiz as it will time out once the time limit is reached (i.e. at 10 PM the quiz will close regardless of your start time).

There will be 2 quizzes with a total of 50 multiple choice questions. This is first quiz will have 20 questions in 20 minutes and the second will have 30 questions in 30 minutes.

There will be only one correct or best answer to each question, and you need to select the option corresponding to this answer. There are no penalties for incorrect answers. While you will be able to refer to the textbook or other resources while you are taking the quiz, you cannot afford to do this for every question because of the time limit. You need to have a good understanding of the unit content before taking the quiz. Each student will receive a customised quiz, chosen in random fashion from the test bank, so that collusion will not be possible.

The presentation of questions is one page at a time with 5 questions per page. You must complete each page before you go on to the next one. Attempts to backtrack to previous pages are not allowed.

Example -

Q. Which theorist developed ‘power elite’ theory?

a. Robert Merton

b. Emile Durkheim

c. Erving Goffman

d. C. Wright Mills *

The correct answer is (d) C. Wright Mills—this is the one you need to tick. Students who may have special difficulties in undertaking the quiz need to contact the unit coordinator as early as possible to make the necessary arrangements.

NB These are quizzes and not EXAMS so they are not sat in exam period.


Referencing Style

Submission
Online

Learning Outcomes Assessed
  • Identify the relevance of sociological concepts for developing professional identity


Graduate Attributes
  • Critical Thinking

2 Written Assessment

Assessment Title
Understanding the sociological imagination in human service work

Task Description

Understanding the sociological imagination is an important component of working with people in human services or other professions. For this assessment, you are asked to write a 1000 word essay defining and explaining the three key social structures (class, race and gender) in capitalist societies like Australia. This essay should include your auto-ethnographic reflection on how these structures have impacted on your life.

Please, be aware of your own self-care needs. Do not address social issues which cause you undue distress. Do not interview people for this assessment, use the sociological literature and other sources to explore the issue.

Assessment should include a title page (with your name, student number, course unit code, term/year, name of course unit coordinator, name of assignment, due date for submission and word count – excluding reference list). Essays should be formatted with introduction, body and conclusion, in Times New Roman (12 pt font) with 1.5 line-spacing and include page numbers. Referencing should be in Harvard format (as per guidelines on the Moodle site) and references should be listed on separate page. The 1000 word count (+/-10%) does not include the reference list.


Assessment Due Date

Week 6 Friday (24 Apr 2020) 7:00 pm AEST


Return Date to Students

Week 8 Friday (8 May 2020)


Weighting
25%

Minimum mark or grade
Must submit – you must submit all items to achieve a passing grade

Assessment Criteria

The assessment will be marked based on the following matrix:

HD 85-100% D 75-84% C 65-74% P 50-64% F <50% Marks
Structure -30% 4 3 2.5 <2
Efficacy and organisation 10% (5% each point)
Clear and succinct introduction that introduces the topic and outlines the direction of the paper. Focused on understanding private troubles as public issue

Clear and succinct conclusion that provides closure to the topic and outlines final direction of the paper
Clear and appropriate introduction that introduces the topic and outlines the direction of the paper based on understanding private troubles as public issue. Clear and appropriate closure to the topic and outlines the final direction of the paper Appropriate introduction that introduces the topic and outlines the direction of the paper using concept of private troubles connection to public issues.

Appropriate conclusion to the topic and somewhat outlines the final direction of the paper
Introduction is apparent although consists only of a list of the contents of the paper. Topic not clearly introduced. Conclusion is apparent although consists of only a brief closure of the topic. Topic not clearly concluded No recognisable introduction— the topic is not introduced and/or there is no direction offered in respect of the paper. No recognisable conclusion or the conclusion content is not reflective of the discussion
Presentation 10%
Organisation, structure and approach is succinct and comprehensively addresses the topic and the discussion proceeds logically. Well linked to supporting credible literature.

Consistently accurate with spelling, grammar and paragraph structure
Organisation, structure and approach clearly addresses the topic and discussion proceeds logically. Appropriately linked to credible literature. 1-2 consistent errors with spelling, grammar or paragraph structure Organisation, structure and approach is appropriate and the topic and discussion proceeds for the most part logically. Minimal omissions in links to supporting credible literature. 3-4 consistent errors with spelling, grammar or paragraph structure Organisation, structure and approach allows for misinterpretation of the meaning of the content. Content and discussion is at times repetitive or lacking cohesion. Frequent omissions in links to supporting credible literature 5-6 consistent errors with spelling, grammar or paragraph structure Organisation, structure and approach detract from the meaning of the topic and discussion is irrelevant and lacks cohesion. Little to no links to supporting literature. Literature is not from a credible source Many consistent errors with spelling, grammar or paragraph structure
Referencing 10%))
Consistently integrates up-to-date references to support and reflect all ideas, factual information and quotations. A minimum of 10 contemporary* references are used. These may be peer reviewed and grey literature. Generally integrates up-to-date references to support and reflect ideas, factual information and quotations, with 1 or 2 exceptions. A minimum of 10 contemporary* references are used. These may be peer reviewed and grey literature. Partly integrates up-to-date references to support and reflect ideas, factual information and quotations, with 3 or 4 exceptions. Between 7-9 contemporary* references are used. These may be peer reviewed and grey literature. Occasionally integrates up-to-date references to support and reflect ideas, factual information and quotations, with 5 or 6 exceptions. Between 5-6 contemporary* references are used. These may be peer reviewed and grey literature. Fails to or infrequent attempts (>7 errors) to integrate up-to-date references to support and reflect ideas, factual information and quotations. Less than 5 contemporary* references have been cited.
Accurate Harvard referencing. No errors. Mostly accurate Harvard referencing 1-2 consistent errors (may be made multiple times). Somewhat accurate Harvard referencing. 3 consistent errors (may be made multiple times). Occasionally accurate Harvard referencing. 4 consistent errors (made multiple times). Harvard referencing not used, or more than 5 inaccuracies.
Sociological Content 50%
Knowledge of impact of history (10%)
Student demonstrates thorough understanding and application of an historical sensibility. Student demonstrates an understanding and application of an historical sensibility. Student demonstrates adequate understanding and some application of an historical sensibility. Student demonstrates limited understanding and application of an historical sensibility. Student demonstrates little understanding and application of an historical sensibility.
Knowledge of social structures 30 % (10% for each bullet point)
Student demonstrates thorough understanding and application of social structures. The following topics are covered: · Class structure · Race/ethnicity · Gender Student demonstrates a very good understanding and application of social structures. The following topics are covered: · Class structure · Race/ethnicity · Gender Student demonstrates good understanding of social structures. The following topics are adequately covered. · Class structure · Race/ethnicity · Gender Student demonstrates adequate understanding of social structures. The following topics are covered. · Class structure · Race/ethnicity · Gender Student demonstrates little understanding of social structures. The following topics are not covered: · Class structure · Race/ethnicity · Gender
Knowledge of role of social & cultural norms (10%)
Student demonstrates thorough understanding of the role of cultural norms in constructing ‘common sense’. Student demonstrates a very good understanding of the role of cultural norms in constructing ‘common sense’. Student demonstrates good understanding of the role of cultural norms in constructing ‘common sense’. Student demonstrates adequate understanding of the role of cultural norms in constructing ‘common sense’. Student demonstrates little understanding of the role of cultural norms in constructing ‘common sense’.
Understanding of auto-ethnology as a research method 20%
Student demonstrates thorough understanding of the role of auto-ethnography as a research method Student demonstrates a very good understanding of the role of auto-ethnography as a research method. Student demonstrates good understanding of the role of auto-ethnography as a research method. Student demonstrates adequate understanding of the role of auto-ethnography as a research method Student demonstrates little understanding of the role auto-ethnography as a research method.
Total
Marker Grade

*Contemporary = less than 10 years old.


Referencing Style

Submission
Online

Learning Outcomes Assessed
  • Understand contemporary Australian society in a global context
  • Outline the role of cultural diversity in Australian history and identity


Graduate Attributes
  • Communication
  • Critical Thinking
  • Information Literacy
  • Cross Cultural Competence

3 Written Assessment

Assessment Title
Understanding a social issues using the sociological imagination

Task Description

You are asked to write a 1500 word essay focusing on a current social issue using the sociological imagination template. Some current social issues you may like to choose from include:


* Social models of mental health

* Aboriginal constitutional recognition

* Patterns of Interpersonal violence – both private and public

* Moral panics around drug use

We have discussed issues this term starting from an Indigenous perspective. This means starting our analysis by first considering the impact an issue may have on Indigenous communities. You should refer to this aspect in your essay.

Please, be aware of your own self-care needs. Do not address social issues which cause you undue distress. Do not interview people for this assessment, use the sociological literature and other sources to explore the issue.

As previously the assessment should include a title page (with your name, student number, course unit code, term/year, name of course unit coordinator, name of assignment, due date for submission and word count – excluding reference list). Essays should be formatted with an introduction, body and conclusion, in Times New Roman (12 pt font) with 1.5 line-spacing and include page numbers. Referencing should be in Harvard format (as per guidelines on the Moodle site) and references should be listed on separate page. The 1500 word count (+/-10%) does not include the reference list.


Assessment Due Date

Week 11 Friday (29 May 2020) 7:00 pm AEST


Return Date to Students

Review/Exam Week Monday (8 Jun 2020)


Weighting
50%

Minimum mark or grade
Must submit – you must submit all items to achieve a passing grade

Assessment Criteria

The assessment will be marked based on the following matrix:

HD 85-100% D 75-84% C 65-74% P 50-64% F <50% Marks
Structure 30% 4 3 2.5 <2
Efficacy and organisation 10% (5% each point)
Clear and succinct introduction that introduces the topic and outlines the direction of the paper.

Clear and succinct conclusion that provides closure to the topic and outlines final direction of the paper
Clear and appropriate introduction that introduces the topic and outlines the direction of the paper. Clear and appropriate closure to the topic and outlines the final direction of the paper Appropriate introduction that introduces the topic and outlines the direction of the paper.

Appropriate conclusion to the topic and somewhat outlines the final direction of the paper
Introduction is apparent although consists only of a list of the contents of the paper. Topic not clearly introduced. Conclusion is apparent although consists of only a brief closure of the topic. Topic not clearly concluded No recognisable introduction— the topic is not introduced and/or there is no direction offered in respect of the paper. No recognisable conclusion or the conclusion content is not reflective of the discussion
Presentation 10%
Organisation, structure and approach is succinct and comprehensively addresses the topic and the discussion proceeds logically. Well linked to supporting credible literature.

Consistently accurate with spelling, grammar and paragraph structure
Organisation, structure and approach clearly addresses the topic and discussion proceeds logically. Appropriately linked to credible literature. 1-2 consistent errors with spelling, grammar or paragraph structure Organisation, structure and approach is appropriate and the topic and discussion proceeds for the most part logically. Minimal omissions in links to supporting credible literature. 3-4 consistent errors with spelling, grammar or paragraph structure Organisation, structure and approach allows for misinterpretation of the meaning of the content. Content and discussion is at times repetitive or lacking cohesion. Frequent omissions in links to supporting credible literature 5-6 consistent errors with spelling, grammar or paragraph structure Organisation, structure and approach detract from the meaning of the topic and discussion is irrelevant and lacks cohesion. Little to no links to supporting literature. Literature is not from a credible source Many consistent errors with spelling, grammar or paragraph structure
Referencing 10%
Consistently integrates up-to-date references to support and reflect all ideas, factual information and quotations. A minimum of 10 contemporary* references are used. These may be peer reviewed and grey literature. Generally integrates up-to-date references to support and reflect ideas, factual information and quotations, with 1 or 2 exceptions. A minimum of 10 contemporary* references are used. These may be peer reviewed and grey literature. Partly integrates up-to-date references to support and reflect ideas, factual information and quotations, with 3 or 4 exceptions. Between 7-9 contemporary* references are used. These may be peer reviewed and grey literature. Occasionally integrates up-to-date references to support and reflect ideas, factual information and quotations, with 5 or 6 exceptions. Between 5-6 contemporary* references are used. These may be peer reviewed and grey literature. Fails to or infrequent attempts (>7 errors) to integrate up-to-date references to support and reflect ideas, factual information and quotations. Less than 5 contemporary* references have been cited.
Accurate Harvard referencing. No errors. Mostly accurate Harvard referencing 1-2 consistent errors (may be made multiple times). Somewhat accurate Harvard referencing. 3 consistent errors (may be made multiple times). Occasionally accurate Harvard referencing. 4 consistent errors (made multiple times). Harvard referencing not used, or more than 5 inaccuracies.
Sociological Content 50%
Knowledge of impact of history 10%
Student demonstrates thorough understanding and application of an historical sensibility to the issue Student demonstrates an understanding and application of an historical sensibility to the issue Student demonstrates adequate understanding and some application of an historical sensibility to the issue Student demonstrates limited understanding and application of an historical sensibility to the issue Student demonstrates little understanding and application of an historical sensibility. to the issue
Knowledge of social structures 30% (10% for each bullet point)
Student demonstrates thorough understanding and application of social structures to the issue. The following topics are covered: · Class structure · Race/ethnicity · Gender Student demonstrates a very good understanding and application of social structures to the issue. The following topics are covered: · Class structure · Race/ethnicity · Gender Student demonstrates good understanding of social structures to the issue. The following topics are adequately covered. · Class structure · Race/ethnicity · Gender Student demonstrates adequate understanding of social structures to the issue. The following topics are covered. · Class structure · Race/ethnicity · Gender Student demonstrates little understanding of social structures to the issue... The following topics are not covered: · Class structure · Race/ethnicity · Gender
Knowledge of role of social & cultural norms 10%
Student demonstrates thorough understanding of the role of the cultural ‘common sense’ on this issue and critiques it. Student demonstrates a very good understanding of the role of the cultural ‘common sense’ on this issue and critiques it. Student demonstrates good understanding of the role of the cultural ‘common sense’ on this issue and critiques it. Student demonstrates adequate understanding of the role of the cultural ‘common sense’ on this issue and critiques it. Student demonstrates little understanding of the role the cultural ‘common sense’ on this issue and is not critical
Insight gained by starting from an Indigenous perspective 20%
Student demonstrates thorough understanding of the role of perspective taking in sociological analysis Student demonstrates a very good understanding of the role of perspective taking in sociological analysis. Student demonstrates good understanding of the role of perspective taking in sociological analysis. Student demonstrates adequate understanding of the role of perspective taking in sociological analysis. Student demonstrates little understanding of the role perspective taking in sociological analysis.
Total
Marker Grade

*Contemporary = less than 10 years old.


Referencing Style

Submission
Online

Learning Outcomes Assessed
  • Understand contemporary Australian society in a global context
  • Examine the role of colonialism and resistance in the lives of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People - both past and present.


Graduate Attributes
  • Communication
  • Critical Thinking
  • Information Literacy
  • Cross Cultural Competence

4 Online Quiz(zes)

Assessment Title
Timed Online Quiz 2

Task Description

This is the second of two multi-choice quizzes and contains 30 questions. You will be given one minute per question and each question is worth 0.5 marks.


Number of Quizzes


Frequency of Quizzes

Other


Assessment Due Date

Week 12 Friday (5 Jun 2020) 10:00 pm AEST


Return Date to Students

Week 12 Friday (5 Jun 2020)

The online quiz is graded as it is completed. The results will be available when the overall quiz closes (i.e. the following day).


Weighting
15%

Minimum mark or grade
Must submit – you must submit all items to achieve a passing grade

Assessment Criteria

Objectives

The quizzes are set to test your understanding of fundamental concepts, methods, perspectives and facts covered by the textbooks and lectures. Each quiz covers the whole term’s work up to that point.

Details

These are a timed online quizzes that must be sat on the due date between the hours of 6 AM and 10 PM AEST. If there are time zone issues for you please contact me well in advance.

They will be delivered through the ‘Assessment’ section of the Moodle site, and will only become available on the due date. Students will need to have access to an Internet connection in order to complete the quiz. It is your responsibility to make time to sit the quiz on the due date, and to arrange for a reliable Internet connection. Before you take the quiz, make sure that you are ready (i.e. a proper revision has been done) and choose a time and computer/place with minimum distraction to sit for the quiz (i.e. do not have external disturbances from people, pets, etc).

Be conscious of the time limit while taking the quiz—make sure you have a clock in front of you, and note down your starting time. Do not wait until the last minute to complete the quiz as it will time out once the time limit is reached (i.e. at 10 PM the quiz will close regardless of your start time).

There will be 2 quizzes with a total of 50 multiple choice questions. This is second quiz and will have 30 questions in 30 minutes.

There will be only one correct or best answer to each question, and you need to select the option corresponding to this answer. There are no penalties for incorrect answers. While you will be able to refer to the textbook or other resources while you are taking the quiz, you cannot afford to do this for every question because of the time limit. You need to have a good understanding of the unit content before taking the quiz. Each student will receive a customised quiz, chosen in random fashion from the test bank, so that collusion will not be possible.

The presentation of questions is one page at a time with 5 questions per page. You must complete each page before you go on to the next one. Attempts to backtrack to previous pages are not allowed.

Example -

Q. Which theorist developed ‘power elite’ theory?

a. Robert Merton

b. Emile Durkheim

c. Erving Goffman

d. C. Wright Mills *

The correct answer is (d) C. Wright Mills—this is the one you need to tick. Students who may have special difficulties in undertaking the quiz need to contact the unit coordinator as early as possible to make the necessary arrangements.

NB These are quizzes and not EXAMS so they are not sat in exam period.


Referencing Style

Submission
Online

Learning Outcomes Assessed
  • Identify the relevance of sociological concepts for developing professional identity


Graduate Attributes
  • Critical Thinking

Academic Integrity Statement

As a CQUniversity student you are expected to act honestly in all aspects of your academic work.

Any assessable work undertaken or submitted for review or assessment must be your own work. Assessable work is any type of work you do to meet the assessment requirements in the unit, including draft work submitted for review and feedback and final work to be assessed.

When you use the ideas, words or data of others in your assessment, you must thoroughly and clearly acknowledge the source of this information by using the correct referencing style for your unit. Using others’ work without proper acknowledgement may be considered a form of intellectual dishonesty.

Participating honestly, respectfully, responsibly, and fairly in your university study ensures the CQUniversity qualification you earn will be valued as a true indication of your individual academic achievement and will continue to receive the respect and recognition it deserves.

As a student, you are responsible for reading and following CQUniversity’s policies, including the Student Academic Integrity Policy and Procedure. This policy sets out CQUniversity’s expectations of you to act with integrity, examples of academic integrity breaches to avoid, the processes used to address alleged breaches of academic integrity, and potential penalties.

What is a breach of academic integrity?

A breach of academic integrity includes but is not limited to plagiarism, self-plagiarism, collusion, cheating, contract cheating, and academic misconduct. The Student Academic Integrity Policy and Procedure defines what these terms mean and gives examples.

Why is academic integrity important?

A breach of academic integrity may result in one or more penalties, including suspension or even expulsion from the University. It can also have negative implications for student visas and future enrolment at CQUniversity or elsewhere. Students who engage in contract cheating also risk being blackmailed by contract cheating services.

Where can I get assistance?

For academic advice and guidance, the Academic Learning Centre (ALC) can support you in becoming confident in completing assessments with integrity and of high standard.

What can you do to act with integrity?