CQUniversity Unit Profile
SOCL11059 Introducing Social Change
Introducing Social Change
All details in this unit profile for SOCL11059 have been officially approved by CQUniversity and represent a learning partnership between the University and you (our student).
The information will not be changed unless absolutely necessary and any change will be clearly indicated by an approved correction included in the profile.
General Information

Overview

The unit will explore the activities of various social change leaders, how they think about what they do, how they organise for change in the not-for-profit or social enterprise sector. It is concerned with exploring the world we live in and what we can do to make a difference. It will provide an overview of issues, theories and practical knowledges that enable students to understand the world of the 21st Century and to be equipped to participate as active citizens focused on people, planet and prosperity.

Details

Career Level: Undergraduate
Unit Level: Level 1
Credit Points: 6
Student Contribution Band: 10
Fraction of Full-Time Student Load: 0.125

Pre-requisites or Co-requisites

There are no requisites for this unit.

Important note: Students enrolled in a subsequent unit who failed their pre-requisite unit, should drop the subsequent unit before the census date or within 10 working days of Fail grade notification. Students who do not drop the unit in this timeframe cannot later drop the unit without academic and financial liability. See details in the Assessment Policy and Procedure (Higher Education Coursework).

Offerings For Term 1 - 2018

Distance

Attendance Requirements

All on-campus students are expected to attend scheduled classes – in some units, these classes are identified as a mandatory (pass/fail) component and attendance is compulsory. International students, on a student visa, must maintain a full time study load and meet both attendance and academic progress requirements in each study period (satisfactory attendance for International students is defined as maintaining at least an 80% attendance record).

Class and Assessment Overview

Recommended Student Time Commitment

Each 6-credit Undergraduate unit at CQUniversity requires an overall time commitment of an average of 12.5 hours of study per week, making a total of 150 hours for the unit.

Class Timetable

Bundaberg, Cairns, Emerald, Gladstone, Mackay, Rockhampton, Townsville
Adelaide, Brisbane, Melbourne, Perth, Sydney

Assessment Overview

1. Portfolio
Weighting: 50%
2. Written Assessment
Weighting: 50%

Assessment Grading

This is a graded unit: your overall grade will be calculated from the marks or grades for each assessment task, based on the relative weightings shown in the table above. You must obtain an overall mark for the unit of at least 50%, or an overall grade of ‘pass’ in order to pass the unit. If any ‘pass/fail’ tasks are shown in the table above they must also be completed successfully (‘pass’ grade). You must also meet any minimum mark requirements specified for a particular assessment task, as detailed in the ‘assessment task’ section (note that in some instances, the minimum mark for a task may be greater than 50%). Consult the University’s Grades and Results Policy for more details of interim results and final grades.

Previous Student Feedback

Feedback, Recommendations and Responses

Every unit is reviewed for enhancement each year. At the most recent review, the following staff and student feedback items were identified and recommendations were made.

Feedback from Moodle survey

Feedback

Lectures needed to value add to change maker interviews

Recommendation

Will write lectures in line with textbook.

Feedback from Moodle survey

Feedback

Students were unclear about how the Moodle Posts and Final Assessment were connected

Recommendation

The course will be re-written to give it a specific social innovation focus.

Unit Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this unit, you will be able to:
  1. Discuss relevant social change issues and problems related to the growth of the third sector in Australia
  2. Develop capacities to prepare students to be social change leaders for the benefit of the community within the social sector
  3. Develop skills and knowledge to investigate social problems, develop proposals for action at individual and group levels.
  4. Enhance theoretical and conceptual analysis which will raise questions about policies and practices in social enterprises/voluntary and community organisations
  5. Use reflective learning practice and develop responsibility and independent learning
Alignment of Learning Outcomes, Assessment and Graduate Attributes
N/A Level
Introductory Level
Intermediate Level
Graduate Level
Professional Level
Advanced Level

Alignment of Assessment Tasks to Learning Outcomes

Assessment Tasks Learning Outcomes
1 2 3 4 5
1 - Portfolio - 50%
2 - Written Assessment - 50%

Alignment of Graduate Attributes to Learning Outcomes

Graduate Attributes Learning Outcomes
1 2 3 4 5
1 - Communication
2 - Problem Solving
3 - Critical Thinking
4 - Information Literacy
5 - Team Work
6 - Information Technology Competence
7 - Cross Cultural Competence
8 - Ethical practice
9 - Social Innovation

Alignment of Assessment Tasks to Graduate Attributes

Assessment Tasks Graduate Attributes
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
1 - Portfolio - 50%
2 - Written Assessment - 50%
Textbooks and Resources

Textbooks

Prescribed

Take back the economy: An Ethical Guide for Transforming Our Communities (2013)

Authors: J.K. Gibson-Graham, Jenny Cameron, and Stephen Healy
University of Minnesota Press
Minneapolis Minneapolis , Minnesota , USA
ISBN:
Binding: Other

IT Resources

You will need access to the following IT resources:
  • CQUniversity Student Email
  • Internet
  • Unit Website (Moodle)
Referencing Style

All submissions for this unit must use the referencing style: Harvard (author-date)

For further information, see the Assessment Tasks.

Teaching Contacts
Shane Hopkinson Unit Coordinator
s.hopkinson@cqu.edu.au
Schedule
Week 1 Begin Date: 05 Mar 2018

Module/Topic

Introducing social innovation

Chapter

Gibson-Graham et al 2013. Intro  

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 2 Begin Date: 12 Mar 2018

Module/Topic

MODULE ONE: Re-framing Economy/Re-framing ourselves

Chapter

Gibson-Graham et al 2013. Chapter 1

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 3 Begin Date: 19 Mar 2018

Module/Topic


Chapter

Events and Submissions/Topic

Moodle Post 1 Due Friday 24/03/18

Week 4 Begin Date: 26 Mar 2018

Module/Topic

MODULE TWO: Surviving Well

Chapter

Gibson-Graham et al 2013. Chapter 2

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 5 Begin Date: 02 Apr 2018

Module/Topic


Chapter

Events and Submissions/Topic

Moodle Post 2 Due Friday 07/04/18

Vacation Week Begin Date: 09 Apr 2018

Module/Topic

Chapter

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 6 Begin Date: 16 Apr 2018

Module/Topic

MODULE THREE: Distributing surplus

Chapter

Gibson-Graham et al 2013. Chapter 3

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 7 Begin Date: 23 Apr 2018

Module/Topic


Chapter

Events and Submissions/Topic

Moodle Post 3 Due Friday 28/04/18

Week 8 Begin Date: 30 Apr 2018

Module/Topic

MODULE FOUR: Commoning

Chapter

Gibson-Graham et al 2013. Chapter 4

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 9 Begin Date: 07 May 2018

Module/Topic

Chapter

Events and Submissions/Topic

Moodle Post 4 Due Friday 12/05/18

Week 10 Begin Date: 14 May 2018

Module/Topic

MODULE FIVE: Investing in futures

Chapter

Gibson-Graham et al 2013. Chapter 

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 11 Begin Date: 21 May 2018

Module/Topic

Chapter

Events and Submissions/Topic

Moodle Post 5 Due Friday 26/05/18

Week 12 Begin Date: 28 May 2018

Module/Topic

Chapter

Events and Submissions/Topic

Review/Exam Week Begin Date: 04 Jun 2018

Module/Topic

Chapter

Events and Submissions/Topic

Exam Week Begin Date: 11 Jun 2018

Module/Topic

Chapter

Events and Submissions/Topic

Term Specific Information


Assessment Tasks

1 Portfolio

Assessment Title
PORTFOLIO

Task Description

The portfolio consists of 1500 words in total - being 5 x 300 word Moodle posts.

You are required to submit five 300 word posts to the graded Moodle Forum set up for the relevant week. Each individual post will marked out of 10 for an overall mark out of 50.These are to be submitted to the Moodle forum at the end of the relevant module. There will be a separate Moodle forum to which you can submit a rough draft - using dot points or interesting sources - for feedback from the lecturer and for discussion with your peers. This will remain open until the final posting is due. Students are encouraged to post early to this forum and discuss their posts and then re-submit to the graded forum before the due date. Other posts in the final graded forum will not be visible until you submit yours.

The purpose of these Moodle posts is to develop your ability to reflect on the unit materials and demonstrate your learning. You are required to critically reflect on an idea or issue that you found particularly interesting or significant.

Each posting to the Moodle Forums should provide evidence of your learning and thinking about the module. The posts to the Moodle Forums do not need to be lengthy and should not exceed the required 300 words per posting. Put your post in the text box not attached as a document or file. Postings do need to demonstrate that you have given some thought to the topic - back up by other sources you have looked at (no more than 2 or 3). A brief, concisely written answer to the question is more effective than a long, winded general comment.  Where appropriate, you should refer to the literature to support your discussion and provide an in-text citation for any sources that you use. If you do use a direct quote, it should only be included if you then make comment on what the author has said. If you use a direct quote as part of your discussion it MUST BE clearly indicated as such and you will need to provide full reference details in Harvard (author/date) style.

THE MINIMUM EXPECTATION FOR THIS ASSESSMENT ITEM IS THAT YOU PROVIDE FORTNIGHTLY POSTINGS FOR GRADING AS OUTLINED ABOVE. YOU ARE ENCOURAGED TO ENGAGE WITH THE WEEKLY DISCUSSION FORUMS AS FEEDBACK WILL IMPROVE YOUR GRADE.


Assessment Due Date

Posts are due anytime before Friday in weeks 3, 5, 7, 9, 11


Return Date to Students

Posts will be graded within the following week


Weighting
50%

Minimum mark or grade
Students must complete both assessments to pass the unit.

Assessment Criteria

Insight and reflection: To what degree have you reflected on the topic?
Imagination: Are your reflections/thoughts about the issue you’ve raised original and incisive?
Research: Are you able to demonstrate some relevant further reading on the topic? Are your sources good quality/credible?
Presentation and communication. Is the way you’ve summed up the your responses to the topic in a clear, concise way? Is your referencing accurate?


Referencing Style

Submission
Online

Submission Instructions
By posting in graded Moodle Forum

Learning Outcomes Assessed
  • Discuss relevant social change issues and problems related to the growth of the third sector in Australia
  • Develop capacities to prepare students to be social change leaders for the benefit of the community within the social sector
  • Develop skills and knowledge to investigate social problems, develop proposals for action at individual and group levels.
  • Enhance theoretical and conceptual analysis which will raise questions about policies and practices in social enterprises/voluntary and community organisations
  • Use reflective learning practice and develop responsibility and independent learning


Graduate Attributes
  • Communication
  • Problem Solving
  • Critical Thinking
  • Information Literacy
  • Information Technology Competence
  • Ethical practice

2 Written Assessment

Assessment Title
SOCIAL INNOVATION CASE STUDY

Task Description

You are required to write a 1500 word essay on an area of social innovation that was discussed in the unit. Taking your cue from the module "workshops" or changemaker interviews you should examine an issue of social change that interests you and examine how it might contribute to solving social problems we are facing. The essay should use the process of 'Theory-U' that we cover in the unit as a method for analysing social problems and thinking deeply about what socially innovative solutions might look like. 


Assessment Due Date

Return Date to Students

Weighting
50%

Minimum mark or grade
Students must complete both assessments to pass the unit.

Assessment Criteria

The following criteria will be used to grade the assignment (they are not of equal weighting):

Referencing: All evidence and all ideas which are not your own must be adequately acknowledged at the appropriate point in the text through the Harvard system of referencing, whether you are quoting directly or paraphrasing. You should familiarise yourself with the University policy on plagiarism. Plagiarism is defined in the Undergraduate Handbook, and is explained on the University’s library website. It is essential that you know your obligations in relation to presenting well documented and original work.

Presentation: There is a certain standard of presentation which is expected at this unit level. This includes correct spelling, grammar, punctuation and referencing. If there are typographical errors in your assignments, you will lose marks. You should not use sexist, racist or other forms of discriminatory language.

Originality: To get a distinction or high distinction, there needs to be evidence of critical thinking and original thought. You are encouraged to create original arguments by analysing and evaluating the works of other people in the literature. Regardless of the grade you are aiming at, you should put things into your own words as much as possible, and structure the assignment in your own way.

Sociological insight and understanding: You will be assessed on your ability to understand and to apply relevant concepts, theories and methodologies. Depending on the assessment task, you may only refer to one or two perspectives in a particular piece of work, but it is important to know how the perspective you refer to relates to other possible perspectives within the field. Theories do not develop in isolation. New perspectives develop through modification of previous ones, or as critical reactions against them. Thinking critically is an important skill which follows on from such appreciation. This means being able to assess the adequacy of the theoretical models being used by the writers you refer to, as well as the adequacy of the evidence they present to support these models. Purely descriptive accounts will not be acceptable.

Use of supporting evidence: Except for purely theoretical essays, it is important that you back up your arguments with appropriate and solid evidence. There is no point in simply asserting that something is true, you need to substantiate your major claims with relevant concrete information, statistical or other. In general, this would be evidence derived from sociological works that you have come across in your reading, although this may need to be supplemented with other kinds of evidence (from the Australian Bureau of Statistics, for example).

Relevance and structure of your argument: Your assignments should be relevant to the question or task set, and should be structured in a logical and coherent fashion. The essay needs to contain an introduction, discussion, conclusion and reference list. In the essay your argument should unfold in a clear and logical manner, with appropriate signposts for the reader. Subheadings may be used in the essay to help structure your writing. An introduction sets out how you are going to approach the topic—that is, it is a statement of intent, rather than of content. You should stick to the required word length. Being under the word limit usually indicates insufficient research; being over means you are having difficulty in focusing on the most relevant or most important points.

Independent reading and research: You will be assessed on the extent, depth and relevance of your reading. You should make full use of the textbook and other readings, but it is essential that you do your own independent reading as well. This means making use of the library databases and catalogue and doing you own searches. Within the limitations of library resources, you should access the most relevant and most important works relating to your topic. It is difficult to provide exact requirements, but as a rough guide a major essay would contain at least ten references. These references should be mainly sociological books, book chapters, or journal articles; other sources may be used as appropriate to supplement these. In general the following types of sources should be avoided when writing essays—encyclopaedia, popular magazines, newspapers (except for providing up-to-date information or real life examples), introductory sociology textbooks, ordinary dictionaries (use the definitions in a specialist source; in some cases a sociology dictionary may be appropriate) and general internet sites (those containing information not peer-reviewed). You should rely mainly on specialist sources—avoid general or popular sources, except perhaps to provide evidence which is not available in the more specialist sources. Where possible use the original source, or an equivalent one.

A copy of the criteria and marking sheet and Harvard (author-date) referencing style guide will also be available in the Assessment block on Moodle. It is strongly recommended that you refer to these documents in the preliminary stages of your assignment preparation and prior to submitting your work for marking.


Referencing Style

Submission
Online

Submission Instructions
Submitted via Moodle Site.

Learning Outcomes Assessed
  • Discuss relevant social change issues and problems related to the growth of the third sector in Australia
  • Develop capacities to prepare students to be social change leaders for the benefit of the community within the social sector
  • Develop skills and knowledge to investigate social problems, develop proposals for action at individual and group levels.
  • Enhance theoretical and conceptual analysis which will raise questions about policies and practices in social enterprises/voluntary and community organisations
  • Use reflective learning practice and develop responsibility and independent learning


Graduate Attributes
  • Communication
  • Problem Solving
  • Critical Thinking
  • Information Literacy
  • Information Technology Competence
  • Ethical practice

Academic Integrity Statement

As a CQUniversity student you are expected to act honestly in all aspects of your academic work.

Any assessable work undertaken or submitted for review or assessment must be your own work. Assessable work is any type of work you do to meet the assessment requirements in the unit, including draft work submitted for review and feedback and final work to be assessed.

When you use the ideas, words or data of others in your assessment, you must thoroughly and clearly acknowledge the source of this information by using the correct referencing style for your unit. Using others’ work without proper acknowledgement may be considered a form of intellectual dishonesty.

Participating honestly, respectfully, responsibly, and fairly in your university study ensures the CQUniversity qualification you earn will be valued as a true indication of your individual academic achievement and will continue to receive the respect and recognition it deserves.

As a student, you are responsible for reading and following CQUniversity’s policies, including the Student Academic Integrity Policy and Procedure. This policy sets out CQUniversity’s expectations of you to act with integrity, examples of academic integrity breaches to avoid, the processes used to address alleged breaches of academic integrity, and potential penalties.

What is a breach of academic integrity?

A breach of academic integrity includes but is not limited to plagiarism, self-plagiarism, collusion, cheating, contract cheating, and academic misconduct. The Student Academic Integrity Policy and Procedure defines what these terms mean and gives examples.

Why is academic integrity important?

A breach of academic integrity may result in one or more penalties, including suspension or even expulsion from the University. It can also have negative implications for student visas and future enrolment at CQUniversity or elsewhere. Students who engage in contract cheating also risk being blackmailed by contract cheating services.

Where can I get assistance?

For academic advice and guidance, the Academic Learning Centre (ALC) can support you in becoming confident in completing assessments with integrity and of high standard.

What can you do to act with integrity?