CQUniversity Unit Profile
SOCL11060 Being Bad
Being Bad
All details in this unit profile for SOCL11060 have been officially approved by CQUniversity and represent a learning partnership between the University and you (our student).
The information will not be changed unless absolutely necessary and any change will be clearly indicated by an approved correction included in the profile.
General Information

Overview

This unit looks at the contributions that culture, social structures and interpersonal relationships make to the formation of normal and deviant identities and behaviours in contemporary society. In addition to undertaking an analysis of competing theoretical perspectives of deviance and identity, you will be given the opportunity to explore key debates and controversies related to identified forms of deviant behaviour. You will also be required to compare and contrast beliefs and attitudes toward the major forms of personal deviance with focus on current formal and informal responses and practices. Special attention will be given to behaviours that are thought to be wild, risky, unacceptable or dangerous including: drug and alcohol use, sexual deviance, offensive behaviours, such as offensive humour and swearing, and body modification practices. You will be provided opportunities to consider questions such as, ‘is ‘being bad’ a form of resistance to, or a symptom of, a culture that has commodified deviant identities and can ‘bad behaviour’ ever be good? The unit will draw on a range of theoretical perspectives in Sociology and Cultural Studies and also use examples from The Arts, Philosophy, and Religious Studies.

Details

Career Level: Undergraduate
Unit Level: Level 1
Credit Points: 6
Student Contribution Band: 10
Fraction of Full-Time Student Load: 0.125

Pre-requisites or Co-requisites

There are no requisites for this unit.

Important note: Students enrolled in a subsequent unit who failed their pre-requisite unit, should drop the subsequent unit before the census date or within 10 working days of Fail grade notification. Students who do not drop the unit in this timeframe cannot later drop the unit without academic and financial liability. See details in the Assessment Policy and Procedure (Higher Education Coursework).

Offerings For Term 2 - 2018

Distance
Rockhampton

Attendance Requirements

All on-campus students are expected to attend scheduled classes – in some units, these classes are identified as a mandatory (pass/fail) component and attendance is compulsory. International students, on a student visa, must maintain a full time study load and meet both attendance and academic progress requirements in each study period (satisfactory attendance for International students is defined as maintaining at least an 80% attendance record).

Class and Assessment Overview

Recommended Student Time Commitment

Each 6-credit Undergraduate unit at CQUniversity requires an overall time commitment of an average of 12.5 hours of study per week, making a total of 150 hours for the unit.

Class Timetable

Bundaberg, Cairns, Emerald, Gladstone, Mackay, Rockhampton, Townsville
Adelaide, Brisbane, Melbourne, Perth, Sydney

Assessment Overview

1. Written Assessment
Weighting: 40%
2. Written Assessment
Weighting: 25%
3. Written Assessment
Weighting: 35%

Assessment Grading

This is a graded unit: your overall grade will be calculated from the marks or grades for each assessment task, based on the relative weightings shown in the table above. You must obtain an overall mark for the unit of at least 50%, or an overall grade of ‘pass’ in order to pass the unit. If any ‘pass/fail’ tasks are shown in the table above they must also be completed successfully (‘pass’ grade). You must also meet any minimum mark requirements specified for a particular assessment task, as detailed in the ‘assessment task’ section (note that in some instances, the minimum mark for a task may be greater than 50%). Consult the University’s Grades and Results Policy for more details of interim results and final grades.

Previous Student Feedback

Feedback, Recommendations and Responses

Every unit is reviewed for enhancement each year. At the most recent review, the following staff and student feedback items were identified and recommendations were made.

Feedback from Student Evaluation Survey

Feedback

Several students suggested that clarity is needed on the Moodle site with regard to which resources are required and which are supplementary.

Recommendation

This is fair comment. The unit has a wide range of resources, many of which are optional to view or read. The moodle website and resources will be reviewed with a view to adding further clarity as to which as required resources and which are supplementary.

Unit Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this unit, you will be able to:
  1. Explain the contributions that culture, social structures and interpersonal relationships make to the formation of normal and deviant identities in contemporary society.
  2. Apply sociological concepts and theories to key debates and controversies related to identified forms of deviant behaviour.
  3. Analyse competing theoretical perspectives of deviance and identity.
  4. Outline the positive and negative consequences of deviance.
  5. Compare and contrast beliefs and attitudes to contemporary views of behavioural social norms and deviance.
Alignment of Learning Outcomes, Assessment and Graduate Attributes
N/A Level
Introductory Level
Intermediate Level
Graduate Level
Professional Level
Advanced Level

Alignment of Assessment Tasks to Learning Outcomes

Assessment Tasks Learning Outcomes
1 2 3 4 5
1 - Written Assessment - 40%
2 - Written Assessment - 25%
3 - Written Assessment - 35%

Alignment of Graduate Attributes to Learning Outcomes

Graduate Attributes Learning Outcomes
1 2 3 4 5
1 - Communication
2 - Problem Solving
3 - Critical Thinking
4 - Information Literacy
5 - Team Work
6 - Information Technology Competence
7 - Cross Cultural Competence
8 - Ethical practice
9 - Social Innovation

Alignment of Assessment Tasks to Graduate Attributes

Assessment Tasks Graduate Attributes
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
1 - Written Assessment - 40%
2 - Written Assessment - 25%
3 - Written Assessment - 35%
Textbooks and Resources

Textbooks

There are no required textbooks.

IT Resources

You will need access to the following IT resources:
  • CQUniversity Student Email
  • Internet
  • Unit Website (Moodle)
Referencing Style

All submissions for this unit must use the referencing styles below:

For further information, see the Assessment Tasks.

Teaching Contacts
Michele Wolfe Unit Coordinator
m.wolfe@cqu.edu.au
Schedule
Week 1 Begin Date: 16 Jul 2018

Module/Topic

Understanding 'bad behaviour': explorations of deviance

Chapter

Your reading for this week is to familiarise yourself with the unit website and read the 'Introduction to deviance' paper available on the unit website.

A supplementary reading that will be helpful throughout the unit is CRO: Cohen, S. Folk devils and moral panics: the creation of Mods and Rockers.

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 2 Begin Date: 23 Jul 2018

Module/Topic

Fifty shades of constraint: Censorship and social control

Chapter

Allan, K. 2007. Censorship and censoring.


Additional readings will be available on the unit Moodle site.

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 3 Begin Date: 30 Jul 2018

Module/Topic

WTF?: Offensive behaviours, cultural mores and folkways

Chapter

CRO: Allan, K. & Burridge, K. 2006. Forbidden words: Taboo and the censoring of language.


CRO: Russell, P. 2010. Savage or civilised?: Manners in colonial Australia.


CRO: Silverton, P. 2010. Filthy English: The how, why, when and what of everyday swearing.

Events and Submissions/Topic

Online focus questions are due at 11.55 pm on the second Sunday after the release of the question.

Week 4 Begin Date: 06 Aug 2018

Module/Topic

Slice and dice: Creating the culturally acceptable body

Chapter

CRO: Salecl, R 2001. Cut in the body: From clitoridectomy to body art.


Tapscott, R 2012 Understanding breast "ironing"" A study of the methods, motivations and outcomes of breast flattening practices in Cameroon.


Wilson, AM 2013. How the methods used to eliminate foot binding in China can be employed to eradicate female genital mutilation - available through the unit website.


Additional readings will be available on the unit Moodle site.

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 5 Begin Date: 13 Aug 2018

Module/Topic

The human canvas: Creating the subculturally acceptable body

Chapter

CRO: Mifflin, M 2013. Circus ladies and society women.


Irwin, K 2001. Legitimating the First Tattoo: Moral passage through informal interaction


Additional readings will be available on the unit Moodle site.

Events and Submissions/Topic

Vacation Week Begin Date: 20 Aug 2018

Module/Topic

Chapter

Events and Submissions/Topic

Written Assessment - Powerpoint presentation Due: Week 6 Friday (24 Aug 2018) 11:55 pm AEST
Week 6 Begin Date: 27 Aug 2018

Module/Topic

Victimless vice? 1: Sexual deviances and adult entertainments

Chapter

CRO: Thio, A., Taylor, JD & Schwartz, MD 2013. Deviant Behaviour.


Additional readings will be available on the unit Moodle site.

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 7 Begin Date: 03 Sep 2018

Module/Topic

Victimless vice? 2: Art or titillation?: Exploring the parameters of pornography

Chapter

Griffith, JD, Adams LT, Hart, CL & Mitchell S 2012. Why become a pornography actress?


Further readings will be made available on the unit Moodle site.

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 8 Begin Date: 10 Sep 2018

Module/Topic

From FB trolling to lolling: Ethereal imagined communities.

Chapter

CRO: Thio, A., Taylor, JD & Schwartz, MD 2013. Deviant Behaviour pp. 278-289.


Lim SS 2013. On mobile communication and youth "deviance": beyond mora, media and mobile panics.


Additional readings will be available on the unit Moodle site.

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 9 Begin Date: 17 Sep 2018

Module/Topic

'On yer bike mate': Moral panics an excuse for more social control?

Chapter

CRO: Critcher, C 2006. Moral panics and the media


Additional readings will be available on the unit Moodle site.

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 10 Begin Date: 24 Sep 2018

Module/Topic

'The sound of the suburbs': From counterculture to mainstream

Chapter

Chambliss WJ 1973. The Saints and the Roughnecks - available through the unit website.


Additional readings will be available on the unit Moodle site.

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 11 Begin Date: 01 Oct 2018

Module/Topic

'A bit of blow': Substances - social use or social abuse?

Chapter

Additional readings will be available on the unit Moodle site.

Events and Submissions/Topic

Written Assessment - Deviancy project Due: Week 12 Tuesday (2 Oct 2018) 11:45 pm AEST
Week 12 Begin Date: 08 Oct 2018

Module/Topic

Review week

Chapter

Events and Submissions/Topic

Review/Exam Week Begin Date: 15 Oct 2018

Module/Topic

Chapter

Events and Submissions/Topic

Exam Week Begin Date: 22 Oct 2018

Module/Topic

Chapter

Events and Submissions/Topic

Assessment Tasks

1 Written Assessment

Assessment Title
Written Assessment - Online Focus Questions

Task Description

Online focus questions

Objectives

The first assessment for this course consists of two questions each worth 20%. The online focus questions encourage you to develop foundational knowledge and skills, and demonstrate understanding of the information presented. This will provide you with the opportunity for ongoing engagement with the course material, and demonstrate that you possess foundational knowledge, as well as critical knowledge, of topics presented.


Questions

During weeks 3, 5, 7, 9 and 10, a question will be posted in the unit Moodle website. You are required to post a response to at least TWO questions. Each question will be 'open' for TWO WEEKS and responses to the question must be posted in the relevant section of the unit Moodle website. At the end of the two-week period the question will 'close'. Questions are worth 20 marks each. You are allowed to answer a maximum of THREE online focus questions, with the TWO best marks submitted for the final assessment grade.

Please make sure that you read the marking criteria for each online focus question very closely. The nature of the tasks contained within the different online focus questions may differ and as such, the marking criteria may differ between questions. You are expected to demonstrate that you have read wider than the unit materials and cite from a range of books and articles. Given the nature of some of the subjects that will be covered during the term, you are allowed to include websites as sources. You will be given direction on this for each individual online focus question.

Although you are encouraged to use the Internet to find information, you must not rely exclusively on material gained from the use of search engines and please note, you are NOT allowed to use Wikipedia as one of your references. Think about the quality of the information that you access. The course materials should help give you a starting point in answering some of the questions. Remember though, any evidence of cutting and pasting from websites will result in your work being severely penalised.


Standard requirements

Formal online posts are considered academic pieces of work and as such should follow academic conventions with regard to presentation. Posts therefore, must contain in-text citations, a references list where relevant, and should also present good standards of spelling and grammar.

The Academic Learning Centre (ALC) has numerous resources on its Moodle website to assist you with your study and writing skills.


Assessment Due Date

Ongoing


Return Date to Students

Two weeks after submission


Weighting
40%

Assessment Criteria

Full marking criteria is available on the course website and may include:

Sociological insight and understanding
Originality
Independent reading and research
Relevance and structure of the argument
Use of supporting evidence
Presentation
Standard requirements


Referencing Style

Submission
Online

Submission Instructions
Online focus questions are due 09.00 am on the second Monday after the release of the question.

Learning Outcomes Assessed
  • Apply sociological concepts and theories to key debates and controversies related to identified forms of deviant behaviour.
  • Outline the positive and negative consequences of deviance.
  • Compare and contrast beliefs and attitudes to contemporary views of behavioural social norms and deviance.


Graduate Attributes
  • Communication
  • Problem Solving
  • Critical Thinking
  • Information Literacy
  • Information Technology Competence
  • Cross Cultural Competence
  • Ethical practice

2 Written Assessment

Assessment Title
Written Assessment - Powerpoint presentation

Task Description

Objectives

This task consists of a powerpoint or equivalent presentation. The assessment provides you with the opportunity to develop a sociological case study of a selected form of deviance.


Question

You are required to produce a case study slide presentation which demonstrates a theoretical and informed sociological understanding of a particular form of deviance. You are free to choose a form of deviant behaviour that is not directly addressed within the unit topics for your case study. However, if you decide to choose a subject not included in the schedule please check the suitability of your choice with your unit co-ordinator.


Your presentation MUST include at least TWO slides addressing the following aspect:

  • Use sociological theory to explain why the selected form of behaviour/case is a form of deviance.


Your presentation MUST also include at least ONE slide for each of the following aspects:

  • Description of the selected deviance.
  • What social norms or rules does the form of deviance violate?
  • Has the status of 'deviance' for this behaviour shifted in any way?
  • What are the common social reactions to the form of deviance?
  • What negative sanctions does the form of deviance normally provoke?
  • A summary of either one newspaper/Internet/journal article discussing the selected act of deviance. (Don't forget to include this in your references list.)


Your presentation MUST also include:

  • At least FOUR images in your presentation.


Other aspects which are optional but you might want to consider in relation to your selected case:

  • Are there any positive effects of the behaviour?
  • Is the status of the deviance dependent on the background of the individual?
  • Details of any groups/communities specifically aimed at the selected form of deviance. (e.g.online - support groups, advocacy communitities, insight communities) 

Although you are encouraged to use the Internet to find information, you must not rely exclusively on material gained from the use of search engines such as Google and please note, you are NOT allowed to use Wikipedia as one of your references. Think about the quality of the information that you access. The unit materials should help give you a starting point in answering some of the questions. Remember though, any evidence of cutting and pasting from websites will result in your work being severely penalised. Further guidelines for this assessment will be made available during the lectures.


Standard requirements– Powerpoint presentation

You should aim to produce a document that would inform a 20 minute presentation. If using powerpoint or the equivalent you should have no less than 12 and no more than 17 slides inclusive of 'Title' and 'References' slides. You need to ensure that the presentation adheres to academic conventions and as such has correct spelling, grammar, punctuation and referencing. Other presentation standards include 18-25 point font (with the exception of the title slide, slide headings, the references slide and copyright or source acknowledgements for images).

Do not forget to attribute any images used to the relevant source. You will NOT be required to verbally present the presentation only to submit your presentation document.

The Academic Learning Centre (ALC) has numerous resources on its Moodle website to assist you with your study and writing skills.


Assessment Due Date

Week 6 Friday (24 Aug 2018) 11:55 pm AEST


Return Date to Students

Week 9 Monday (10 Sept 2018)


Weighting
25%

Assessment Criteria

Full marking criteria is available on the course website and may include:

Sociological insight and understanding
Originality
Independent reading and research
Use of supporting evidence
Relevance and structure of the argument
Adherence to assessment requirements
Presentation
Standard requirements


Referencing Style

Submission
Online

Learning Outcomes Assessed
  • Explain the contributions that culture, social structures and interpersonal relationships make to the formation of normal and deviant identities in contemporary society.
  • Outline the positive and negative consequences of deviance.
  • Compare and contrast beliefs and attitudes to contemporary views of behavioural social norms and deviance.


Graduate Attributes
  • Communication
  • Problem Solving
  • Critical Thinking
  • Information Literacy
  • Information Technology Competence
  • Cross Cultural Competence
  • Ethical practice

3 Written Assessment

Assessment Title
Written Assessment - Deviancy project

Task Description

Objective

The culture in which we live can be considered abundant with media that present examples of deviance. Films, television, the Internet, books and magazines contain a plethora of examples of different forms of deviance. This task provides you with the opportunity to apply what you have learned about social control, deviance, social norms and societal reactions to illustrations of socially identified deviance.


Question

You will present one document that consists of three major components. Each component will be a representation of a form of deviance or social control (including censorship). You MUST include at least one example of deviance and one example of social control. Your third component can be either an example of deviance or an example of social control.

You need to use a different form of media across the three components. For example, the link to one video clip, a photograph and a book, or you could choose one newspaper/Internet article, a book and a video game.


Task

For each component you will:

Briefly describe the example and discuss why the selected material is a portrayal of, or related to, deviance or social control.

You will then reflect on what you have learned from the unit about this form of deviance or social control.

You need to reflect on how the unit content has influenced your thoughts. For instance, you might feel that you have learned nothing new to what you previously knew about the form of deviance/social control. That is fine. If this is the case, then it might be that material covered during the unit has confirmed your previously held beliefs and you need to discuss this. It might be that you have learned a theory that helps you to understand and explain the occurrence of a deviant behaviour.

What I am particularly looking for is the ability for you to reflect on the unit content and how this has, or has not, influenced your understanding of the chosen components.


Standard requirements

As this work requires personal reflection you are allowed to use the first person in your writing. Even though this is a reflection assessment your work should follow academic convention with regard to presentation and content. Therefore, it must adhere to word count (600-700 words for each component and total of approximately 1800-2100 +/- 10%), contain in-text citations where relevant, and a reference list, in addition to presenting good standards of spelling and grammar. Other presentation standards include at least 1.5 line spacing and 12 point font, preferably Arial.


Suggested breakdown of component:

100-200 words for the first part – the discussion of why the selected material is a portrayal of, or related to, deviance or social control.

500-600 words for the reflection on the unit content and your understanding of the selected component.

Title page, References list and Appendices (if relevant) are not included in the word count.


Further guidelines for this assessment will be made available on the unit Moodle website.

The Academic Learning Centre (ALC) has numerous resources on its Moodle website to assist you with your study and writing skills.


Assessment Due Date

Week 12 Tuesday (2 Oct 2018) 11:45 pm AEST


Return Date to Students

Exam Week Friday (19 Oct 2018)


Weighting
35%

Assessment Criteria

Full marking criteria is available on the unit Moodlewebsite and may include:

Originality
Sociological insight and understanding
Independent reading and research
Presentation
Standard requirements




Referencing Style

Submission
Online

Learning Outcomes Assessed
  • Explain the contributions that culture, social structures and interpersonal relationships make to the formation of normal and deviant identities in contemporary society.
  • Apply sociological concepts and theories to key debates and controversies related to identified forms of deviant behaviour.
  • Analyse competing theoretical perspectives of deviance and identity.


Graduate Attributes
  • Communication
  • Problem Solving
  • Critical Thinking
  • Information Literacy
  • Information Technology Competence
  • Cross Cultural Competence
  • Ethical practice

Academic Integrity Statement

As a CQUniversity student you are expected to act honestly in all aspects of your academic work.

Any assessable work undertaken or submitted for review or assessment must be your own work. Assessable work is any type of work you do to meet the assessment requirements in the unit, including draft work submitted for review and feedback and final work to be assessed.

When you use the ideas, words or data of others in your assessment, you must thoroughly and clearly acknowledge the source of this information by using the correct referencing style for your unit. Using others’ work without proper acknowledgement may be considered a form of intellectual dishonesty.

Participating honestly, respectfully, responsibly, and fairly in your university study ensures the CQUniversity qualification you earn will be valued as a true indication of your individual academic achievement and will continue to receive the respect and recognition it deserves.

As a student, you are responsible for reading and following CQUniversity’s policies, including the Student Academic Integrity Policy and Procedure. This policy sets out CQUniversity’s expectations of you to act with integrity, examples of academic integrity breaches to avoid, the processes used to address alleged breaches of academic integrity, and potential penalties.

What is a breach of academic integrity?

A breach of academic integrity includes but is not limited to plagiarism, self-plagiarism, collusion, cheating, contract cheating, and academic misconduct. The Student Academic Integrity Policy and Procedure defines what these terms mean and gives examples.

Why is academic integrity important?

A breach of academic integrity may result in one or more penalties, including suspension or even expulsion from the University. It can also have negative implications for student visas and future enrolment at CQUniversity or elsewhere. Students who engage in contract cheating also risk being blackmailed by contract cheating services.

Where can I get assistance?

For academic advice and guidance, the Academic Learning Centre (ALC) can support you in becoming confident in completing assessments with integrity and of high standard.

What can you do to act with integrity?