CQUniversity Unit Profile
SOWK12009 Casework and Case Management
Casework and Case Management
All details in this unit profile for SOWK12009 have been officially approved by CQUniversity and represent a learning partnership between the University and you (our student).
The information will not be changed unless absolutely necessary and any change will be clearly indicated by an approved correction included in the profile.
Corrections

Unit Profile Correction added on 02-04-20

The compulsory residential school for this unit has been cancelled due to COVID-19. Teaching resources usually provided at weekly tutorials offered in some locations and the residential schools are now available on Moodle. Please note important corrections for Assessment 2.

Assessment 2 Practical Assessment Audio Visual recording of initial case work or case management session (individual submission)

Your role play should be undertaken using the video conferencing format of Zoom. All students have access to a student Zoom account. Your role play partner should be a peer from this unit. Information and resources related to setting up or hosting a Zoom session is available on Moodle.

Format

The audio visual recording of your role play should be uploaded to a cloud drive or storage such as One Drive or Google Drive. All students have a One Drive account and therefore this is the preferred file sharing platform. All Zoom recordings should be saved and named with your full name and student number eg. Student Name C947290487. The file link should be checked to ensure it is available for editing and viewing by anyone with the link. Please contact TASAC for any queries related to shared drive storage. The link to your audio visual Zoom session should be copied to your cover sheet. "



General Information

Overview

This unit presents the casework and case management methods as one of several choices for the delivery of social work services in Australia. Students should be able to examine the historical context of the development of casework and case management and analyse the impact of various social work theories on the application of different casework and case management methods to practice contexts. Students should be able to analyse and apply casework and case management methodologies to various scenarios and to critique those applications through the lens of cultural awareness. Students will be required to attend and participate in assessable tasks in the relevant residential school to complete the requirements of this unit

Details

Career Level: Undergraduate
Unit Level: Level 2
Credit Points: 6
Student Contribution Band: 10
Fraction of Full-Time Student Load: 0.125

Pre-requisites or Co-requisites

SOWK11012 Introduction to Social Work A and SOWK11013 Introduction to Social Work B or SOWK11015 Professional Communication in Human Services Co-requisite for CG79 Bachelor of Social Work is SOWK12008 Theories of change for Professional Practice 1

Important note: Students enrolled in a subsequent unit who failed their pre-requisite unit, should drop the subsequent unit before the census date or within 10 working days of Fail grade notification. Students who do not drop the unit in this timeframe cannot later drop the unit without academic and financial liability. See details in the Assessment Policy and Procedure (Higher Education Coursework).

Offerings For Term 1 - 2020

Bundaberg
Mixed Mode
Rockhampton

Attendance Requirements

All on-campus students are expected to attend scheduled classes – in some units, these classes are identified as a mandatory (pass/fail) component and attendance is compulsory. International students, on a student visa, must maintain a full time study load and meet both attendance and academic progress requirements in each study period (satisfactory attendance for International students is defined as maintaining at least an 80% attendance record).

Residential Schools

This unit has a Compulsory Residential School for distance mode students and the details are:
Click here to see your Residential School Timetable.

Class and Assessment Overview

Recommended Student Time Commitment

Each 6-credit Undergraduate unit at CQUniversity requires an overall time commitment of an average of 12.5 hours of study per week, making a total of 150 hours for the unit.

Class Timetable

Bundaberg, Cairns, Emerald, Gladstone, Mackay, Rockhampton, Townsville
Adelaide, Brisbane, Melbourne, Perth, Sydney

Assessment Overview

1. Written Assessment
Weighting: 30%
2. Practical Assessment
Weighting: 30%
3. Written Assessment
Weighting: 40%

Assessment Grading

This is a graded unit: your overall grade will be calculated from the marks or grades for each assessment task, based on the relative weightings shown in the table above. You must obtain an overall mark for the unit of at least 50%, or an overall grade of ‘pass’ in order to pass the unit. If any ‘pass/fail’ tasks are shown in the table above they must also be completed successfully (‘pass’ grade). You must also meet any minimum mark requirements specified for a particular assessment task, as detailed in the ‘assessment task’ section (note that in some instances, the minimum mark for a task may be greater than 50%). Consult the University’s Grades and Results Policy for more details of interim results and final grades.

Previous Student Feedback

Feedback, Recommendations and Responses

Every unit is reviewed for enhancement each year. At the most recent review, the following staff and student feedback items were identified and recommendations were made.

Feedback from Have Your Say

Feedback

Simulated delivery of the residential school was a highlight of the unit.

Recommendation

Attempt to continue to deliver this innovative and engaging simulation at the Noosa residential.

Feedback from UC observations

Feedback

Identifying those students entering university in term 1 to ensure additional support is made available.

Recommendation

Students who have credited into the unit and are in their first term of university studies must be identified early in term to ensure adequate orientation to university processes is achieved in a timely manner.

Feedback from Have Your Say

Feedback

Provide further direction around readings to enhance learning.

Recommendation

Provide a 'Recommended' section in the reading list to assist students to structure their research and reading.

Unit Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this unit, you will be able to:
  1. Describe and interpret the philosophical assumptions that underpin various approaches to casework and case management
  2. Compare and contrast the application of influential social theories to simulated social work case scenarios
  3. Select and justify an application of different social work methods to social work case scenarios
  4. Apply appropriate cross cultural awareness skills and knowledge to case work and case management contexts with indigenous peoples
  5. Analyse their performance from feedback drawn from their involvement in professional learning contexts

This unit addresses the AASW Practice Standards Objectives 1,2 and 5

Alignment of Learning Outcomes, Assessment and Graduate Attributes
N/A Level
Introductory Level
Intermediate Level
Graduate Level
Professional Level
Advanced Level

Alignment of Assessment Tasks to Learning Outcomes

Assessment Tasks Learning Outcomes
1 2 3 4 5
1 - Written Assessment - 30%
2 - Practical Assessment - 30%
3 - Written Assessment - 40%

Alignment of Graduate Attributes to Learning Outcomes

Graduate Attributes Learning Outcomes
1 2 3 4 5
1 - Communication
2 - Problem Solving
3 - Critical Thinking
4 - Information Literacy
5 - Team Work
6 - Information Technology Competence
7 - Cross Cultural Competence
8 - Ethical practice
9 - Social Innovation

Alignment of Assessment Tasks to Graduate Attributes

Assessment Tasks Graduate Attributes
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
1 - Written Assessment - 30%
2 - Practical Assessment - 30%
3 - Written Assessment - 40%
Textbooks and Resources

Textbooks

Prescribed

Basic Personal Counselling 8th edn (2016)

Authors: Geldard, D, Geldard, K, Yin Foo, R.
Cengage Learning Australia
South Melbourne South Melbourne , VIC , Australia
ISBN: 9780170364362
Binding: Paperback
Supplementary

Case Management Inclusive Community Practice 2nd Edition (2016)

Authors: Elizabeth Moore
Oxford University Press
Melbourne Melbourne , Victoria , Australia
ISBN: 9780190303198
Binding: Paperback

Additional Textbook Information

Copies are available for purchase at the CQUni Bookshop here: http://bookshop.cqu.edu.au (search on the Unit code)

IT Resources

You will need access to the following IT resources:
  • CQUniversity Student Email
  • Internet
  • Unit Website (Moodle)
  • Windows Media Player or Quicktime
Referencing Style

All submissions for this unit must use the referencing style: Harvard (author-date)

For further information, see the Assessment Tasks.

Teaching Contacts
Jennice Evans Unit Coordinator
j.e.evans@cqu.edu.au
Shirley Ledger Unit Coordinator
s.ledger@cqu.edu.au
Peter Munn Unit Coordinator
p.munn@cqu.edu.au
Schedule
Week 1 Begin Date: 09 Mar 2020

Module/Topic

Orientation to the course.

  • Ensure that you have read the unit profile thoroughly.
  • Check every drop down box in the unit profile.
  • Check you have Windows Media Player or Quicktime loaded to your computer. Contact servicedesk@cqu.edu.au for assistance.
  • View all audio-visual streams loaded to the Moodle site at the 'Streams' section.
  • Open every link at Moodle as additional important information is sometimes linked behind.
  • Review assessment Information especially assessment criteria below and post your first questions for clarification or learning.

.

Chapter

Events and Submissions/Topic

Register your residential attendance via Moodle. The sooner this task is completed the sooner you can find others to begin Assessment task # 1.

Those attending workshops on Rockhampton or Bundaberg campus can co-ordinate Assessment task # 1 during Week 1.

Week 2 Begin Date: 16 Mar 2020

Module/Topic

Flexible learning
This unit is based on the philosophy of Community-Focussed Learning and therefore does not have a weekly study schedule as this is not the way professional social work analysis occurs. Tips about organising your study schedule are provided in the stream titled 'Community-Focused Learning'.


This unit is designed on the principles of flexible learning meaning you have choices about where you start and finish your reading.


The unit comprises several modules that can be explored in any order:

-Philosophy
-Preparation, planning, getting started;
-Assessment;
-Collaboration;
-Change; and
-Finishing


By removing Weeks 1 & 12 from your study schedule, the amount of time you devote to each module may vary. It is suggested that in each fortnight one week be devoted to readings provided and a second week be devoted to independent searches for readings to inform your assessment tasks.See the assessment criteria for each assessment task.

Chapter

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 3 Begin Date: 23 Mar 2020

Module/Topic

Chapter

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 4 Begin Date: 30 Mar 2020

Module/Topic

Chapter

Events and Submissions/Topic

Assessment task # 1 Part 1 & 2 — Plan for initial casework or case management session with an individual client (duo or trio submission of 1500 words) Due: Week 4 Friday (3 Apr 2020) 5:00 pm AEST
Week 5 Begin Date: 06 Apr 2020

Module/Topic

Chapter

Events and Submissions/Topic

Vacation Week Begin Date: 13 Apr 2020

Module/Topic

Chapter

Events and Submissions/Topic

A compulsory residential is held at Noosa Campus or the Geraldton University Centre and Port Pirie hub between the 17th and 19th of April 2020. The weekly program will continue on Bundaberg and Rockhampton Campus after break week.

Week 6 Begin Date: 20 Apr 2020

Module/Topic

Chapter

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 7 Begin Date: 27 Apr 2020

Module/Topic

Chapter

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 8 Begin Date: 04 May 2020

Module/Topic

Chapter

Events and Submissions/Topic


Week 9 Begin Date: 11 May 2020

Module/Topic

Chapter

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 10 Begin Date: 18 May 2020

Module/Topic

Chapter

Events and Submissions/Topic

Assessment task 2—Audio-visual recording of initial case work or case management session (individual submission - 20 minutes) Due: Week 10 Monday (18 May 2020) 5:00 pm AEST
Week 11 Begin Date: 25 May 2020

Module/Topic

Chapter

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 12 Begin Date: 01 Jun 2020

Module/Topic

Chapter

Events and Submissions/Topic

Assessment task 3—Written critique/analysis of case work or case management session (individual submission of 1500 words) Due: Week 12 Monday (1 Jun 2020) 5:00 pm AEST
Review/Exam Week Begin Date: 08 Jun 2020

Module/Topic

Chapter

Events and Submissions/Topic

Exam Week Begin Date: 15 Jun 2020

Module/Topic

Chapter

Events and Submissions/Topic

Term Specific Information

Students must complete 24 hours of compulsory attendance at either a 3 day residential school or a weekly tutorial held over 12 weeks for 2 hrs per week. Students must decide attendance mode prior to the commencement of term so all hours are able to be completed.

Residential school option (3 days) at either Noosa Campus or the Geraldton University Centre or the Port Pirie hub between the 17th and 19th of April 2020. 

OR weekly tutorials at Bundaberg or Rockhampton Campus commencing week 1 of term 1. Please see timetabling for further details.


Assessment Tasks

1 Written Assessment

Assessment Title
Assessment task # 1 Part 1 & 2 — Plan for initial casework or case management session with an individual client (duo or trio submission of 1500 words)

Task Description

Focus statement:

With a focus on casework and case management, you are required to demonstrate your preparation and knowledge informing the first face-to-face contact with a client in your field placement agency.

Your role:

Imagine that you are social work students sharing the same placement in a human service organisation.

Context:

As students on placement it is your responsibility to co-ordinate your collaborative learning time together in order to be prepared for individual or group supervision sessions and to demonstrate that you can use the time as effectively as possible.

Your field educator has asked you to prepare a plan for an initial assessment session with a client who has been accepted onto your field educator’s case load. Your field educator wants to make a final assessment of your capacity to undertake independent contact with a service user under close supervision. This plan is to demonstrate your knowledge of case work or case management methods for service delivery.

Product/performance (Part 1 Group Submission) 20%:

You have 1500 words to show your preparedness and competency to meet with an individual client for the first time. You are not required to present any ideas beyond what needs to take place at your first-point-of-contact with your client which would usually occur over 1-1.5 hrs of time. You decide on the written format and layout appropriate for a busy working relationship with your field educator. The case studies will be available in week 1 of term on Moodle.

Logistics:

This submission is important preparation for the residential program and weekly workshops.

  • As you arrive to Moodle you will be asked to nominate a case study you are interested in working with for this assessment. For those students attending the weekly residential tutorials, you will have a case study allocated.
  • Within this assessment’s discussion space at Moodle you are to negotiate working with one or two other people for this submission (a duo or trio submission).
  • In Week 1 each learning group will have their case study confirmed and a private wiki space allocated to work together online. This referral forms the basis of the written submission.
  • Each duo or trio will be required to upload one (part 1) submission and then the individual reflection (part 2) should be uploaded separately and as individual submissions.

Word Count: The word count is considered from the first word of the introduction to the last word of the conclusion. It excludes the cover page, abstract, contents page and reference list. It includes in-text references and direct quotations.

Product/performance (Part 2 Individual Submission) 10%:

Individual Reflection

Consider the statements below by Pawar and Anscombe (2015, p. 41)

"...reflection involves deeply and critically thinking about the past practice event in order to improve and/or replicate good practice. Reflective practice involves using those critical reflections for better practice and generating practice-based knowledge".

Reflective practice can often focus on only the 'knowing' and 'doing' of practice. However, it is equally important to focus on the 'being' of practitioners. Pawar and Anscombe (2015, p. 29) further explain"being involves recognising that humans are both shaped by and are shapers of the environment - physically, socially, ecologically and spiritually"

Product/ performance

Each group member must submit their own reflection on how they used 'self' in the group process. Drawing on the literature and your knowledge of reflective and reflexive practice you are to prepare a 500-word response addressing the following:

  • How was your personality influential in the group process?
  • Recalling your experience in the group, how did your belief systems influence the group process and understanding of the case study?
  • What do you understand as the key relational dynamics present in the group process?
  • How did you use anxiety at various phases of the group process?
  • How did you use self-disclosure (or not) during the group process?
  • How did you use justice during the group process?
  • How did you use courage / wisdom / temperance during the group process?
  • What have you learned about your use of self when working with others in a social work learning space?
CRITERIAPART 2 (10%) High Distinction 85 – 100% Distinction 75 – 84% Credit 65 – 74% Pass 50 – 64% Fail 0 – 49%
Demonstrates an understanding of the use of self and can reflect on practice in the group work situation A high level of personal insight and self-awareness demonstrated and presented with relevant examples to illustrate learning A very good level of personal insight and self-awareness demonstrated and presented with relevant examples to illustrate learning A good level of personal insight and self-awareness demonstrated with most questions responded to appropriately An adequate level of personal insight with most questions responded and attempted Limited personal insight described or avoidance at self-reflection demonstrated or reflection is in conflict with professional values


Assessment Due Date

Week 4 Friday (3 Apr 2020) 5:00 pm AEST


Return Date to Students

Week 6 Friday (24 Apr 2020)


Weighting
30%

Assessment Criteria

Assessment 1- Part 1 (20% weighting)

Criteria

PART 1

(20% weighting)

High Distinction 85 – 100% Distinction 75 – 84% Credit 65 – 74% Pass 50 – 64% Fail 0 – 49%
Integration of prior knowledge/learning relevant to the key social issue(s) articulated in the referral (e.g. sociology, law, psychology, Indigenous studies, human services (20%) A high level of integration of prior knowledge and learning relevant to the key social issues articulated in the referral A sound level of integration of prior knowledge and learning relevant to the key social issues articulated in the referral A good level of prior knowledge and learning relevant to the key social issues articulated in the referral An adequate level of prior knowledge and learning relevant to the key social issues articulated in the referral Limited or no integration of prior knowledge and learning relevant to the key social issues articulated in the referral

Application of published social work and human services knowledge about the key social issue(s) articulated in the referral (20%)

Excellent application of    published social work and human services knowledge about the key social issues articulated in the referral

Very good application of published social work and human services knowledge about the key social issues articulated in the referral Good application of published social work and human services knowledge about the key social issues articulated in the referral Some application of published social work and human services knowledge about the key social issues articulated in the referral Poor or no application of published social work and human services knowledge about the key social issues articulated in the referral

Application of published multi-disciplinary knowledge about the key social issue(s) articulated in the referral published in academic literature (10%)

Excellent application of published multi-disciplinary knowledge about the key social issue(s) articulated in the referral published in academic literature Very good application of multi-disciplinary knowledge about the key social issue(s) articulated in the referral published in academic literature Good application of multi-disciplinary knowledge about the key social issue(s) articulated in the referral published in academic literature Some application of multi-disciplinary knowledge about the key social issue(s) articulated in the referral published in academic literature Poor or no application of multi-disciplinary knowledge about the key social issue(s) articulated in the referral published in academic literature

Application of published social work and human service knowledge about effective case work and case management practice published in academic literature (10%)

Excellent application of published social work and human service knowledge about effective casework and case management practice in published academic literature Very good application of published social work and human service knowledge about effective casework and case management practice in published academic literature Good application of published social work and human service knowledge about effective casework and case management practice in published academic literature Some application of published social work and human service knowledge about effective casework and case management practice in published academic literature Poor or no application of published social work and human service knowledge about effective casework and case management practice in published academic literature
Application and justification of priority social work and human service values for first-point-of-contact (10%) Excellent application and justification of priority social work and human service values for first point of contact Very good application and justification of priority social work and human service values for first point of contact Good application and justification of priority social work and human service values for first point of contact Limited application and justification of priority social work and human service values for first point of contact Application and justification of priority social work and human service values for first point of contact was absent or poorly articulated
Explanation and justification of key skills required to execute competent case work or case management service delivery (10%) Excellent explanation and justification of key skills required to execute competent casework and case management service delivery Very good explanation and justification of key skills required to execute competent casework and case management service delivery Good explanation and justification of key skills required to execute competent casework and case management service delivery Limited explanation and justification of key skills required to execute competent casework and case management service delivery Little or no explanation and justification of key skills required to execute competent casework and case management service delivery
Adherence to instructions and teaching input provided through discussion at Moodle for the duration of the term (5%) Excellent adherence to the teaching input provided through the discussions on Moodle for the duration of the term Very good adherence to the teaching input provided through the discussions on Moodle for the duration of the term Good adherence to the teaching input provided through the discussions on Moodle for the duration of the term Some adherence to the teaching input provided through the discussions on Moodle for the duration of the term Poor adherence to the teaching input provided through the discussions on Moodle for the duration of the term
Accuracy of spelling, grammar, proofing and professional presentation (5%) High level of academic writing with attention to spelling, grammar, proof reading and professional presentation Very good level of academic writing with attention to spelling, grammar, proof reading and professional presentation Good level of academic writing with attention to spelling, grammar, proof reading and professional presentation Reasonable academic writing, proof reading and professional presentation with limited errors in spelling and grammar Poor academic writing with many spelling and grammatical errors, requiring further proof reading and attention to professional presentation
Adherence to author-date referencing system (5%) Excellent adherence to author-date referencing system Very good adherence to author-date referencing system Good adherence to author-date referencing system Adherence to author-date referencing system but with some referencing errors Poor adherence to author-date referencing system
Breadth and quality of material evident in final reference list (5%) Excellent breadth and quality of material evident in final reference list Very good breadth and quality of material evident in final reference list Good breadth and quality of material evident in final reference list Limited material evident in final reference list

Poor quality of material evident in final reference list



Referencing Style

Submission
Online Group

Submission Instructions
Create your own coversheet which must contain: the names of all contributors, student numbers, and word count excluding reference lists and appendices. Only one submission is required for each group at Moodle. If you make an error during uploading, please email the final submission with details of the technical difficulties as proof of submission. Moodle will accept late submissions but penalties will apply. You must retain copies of your submission. All electronic submissions must be saved as the students name and assessment number.

Learning Outcomes Assessed
  • Describe and interpret the philosophical assumptions that underpin various approaches to casework and case management
  • Compare and contrast the application of influential social theories to simulated social work case scenarios
  • Apply appropriate cross cultural awareness skills and knowledge to case work and case management contexts with indigenous peoples


Graduate Attributes
  • Communication
  • Problem Solving
  • Critical Thinking
  • Information Literacy
  • Information Technology Competence
  • Cross Cultural Competence
  • Ethical practice

2 Practical Assessment

Assessment Title
Assessment task 2—Audio-visual recording of initial case work or case management session (individual submission - 20 minutes)

Task Description

Focus statement:

Application of the necessary skills, knowledge and values for initiating case work or case management.


Your role:

Imagine you are a social work or human service student undertaking a placement in a human service organisation.


Context:

Your field educator is now proposing that in order for more in-depth supervision to occur, with client consent, you will record a twenty minute excerpt of work undertaken for analysis and critique.


Products/performance:

A twenty minute recording of a simulated learning activity involving your professional response to someone imagining themselves to be a client of a service is required for submission. Most of the learning required for the competent completion of this assessment task will occur over the three days of residential.

This assessment task invites you to begin creating your style of social work practice. In this submission you must introduce yourself as a social work student. Each submission/approach will be as unique as the peers accompanying you in this course. Therefore the emphasis of residential learning is not the demonstration or mimicking of staff skills but a focus on all participants receiving timely feedback from academic staff about the development of your own professional practice.

The complexity of the social issue you choose as the basis of your simulated learning activity is not being assessed; it is your response to a client’s presentation at an agency that is being assessed. In other words, it is not necessary for you to work with an emotionally provocative issue or an overly complex social situation in order to demonstrate your competency and confidence with the casework/case management method.

In preparation for this submission you must undertake the following assessment with anyone offering to role play for you before proceeding to a recording:

  • all people involved in this product are imagining and playing a part in a simulated learning activity
  • all participants are at least 18 years of age
  • the social issue negotiated should not be closely related to past, present or future events for the role player and you must establish this at the outset with the individual who agrees to assist you
  • encourage your participants to draw on their experiences of/create composites of other people they know as opposed to themselves
  • provide your participants with an opportunity to debrief or discuss the simulated experience after it has concluded including: what they thought and how they felt about the experience, breakthroughs in their own thinking about the character they played, unexpected emotions, what they would have said if they had more time, how the person who adopted the client role is different from the simulated learning part the played, what they might do to finish their connection with the person they played
  • inform them of their right to contact the unit coordinator immediately if any distress results from their participation in order for appropriate support and actions to be put into place
  • inform them that the University requires them to sign a form consenting to their involvement (to be provided at Moodle) which must be scanned and uploaded in Moodle

Key tips for successful completion:

  • Approach your role play participants early in the term.  Previous students have been able to complete their video recording after hours at residential school with students in their small learning group
  • Always test run your recording equipment before attempting the full 20 minute product.
  • The camera and audio must focus on you but is useful to have both participants in the frame
  • If time permits, undertake several recordings so you have a choice about which to submit in the end.
  • Even when working with people you know well provide your participant with only the essential information needed. The less information provided, the less anxious your volunteer is likely to be. Sometimes participants become anxious for you if they have too much information to recall. After providing them with the basic scenario give them permission to develop the role in any direction they wish. Give them permission to improvise and let them know that there are no right or wrong ways of creating the person. It’s your task to fit in with their narrative not theirs to fit in with you.
  • In preparation for the critique (Assessment task # 3) – find a critical friend in the class and swap recordings asking for their honest feedback.

Format:

The audio visual recording is to be copied onto a USB for submission or uploaded to a cloud drive or storage such as OneDrive (which all students will have as part of their student enrolment), Google Drive or Dropbox and the submission link shared with the unit coordinator. Students can contact TASAC for support in accessing and using cloud drives. The audio visual recording must be saved in either Windows Media Player or VLC format. Media player and VLC software program are designed for viewing audio visual recordings and are available to download for free from the Internet. Before submitting your audio visual recording you must check that the file type extension is either mp4, mpeg, avi, wav or wmv. 


Documentation:

A consent form must be signed by all participants and uploaded to Moodle.  An Assessment Cover Sheet must also be completed and attached to the audiovisual recording. Assessment Cover Sheets must include the submission link if uploaded to Moodle.


Submission (Online)


Upload a link to your audio visual submission on cloud drive along with the Assessment Cover Sheet and Consent Form on Moodle


Please note: An additional copy of the audio visual recording must be retained by the student.  


Assessment Due Date

Week 10 Monday (18 May 2020) 5:00 pm AEST

Please ensure the recording is saved to the students name student number and assessment title.


Return Date to Students

Week 12 Monday (1 Jun 2020)


Weighting
30%

Assessment Criteria

Assessment Criteria – Assessment 2 High Distinction 85 – 100% Distinction 75 – 84% Credit 65 – 74% Pass 50 – 64% Fail 0 – 49%

Application of knowledge about appropriate use of space including venue, physical arrangement of furniture, choice of furniture, dress code, internal and environmental distractions (5%)


Excellent application of knowledge regarding appropriate space Very good application of knowledge regarding appropriate space Good application of knowledge regarding appropriate space Adequate application of knowledge regarding appropriate space. Inadequate application of knowledge regarding appropriate space e.

Demonstrated competency beginning the working relationship including initiating the sharing of essential information and the negotiation of working roles and contracting (20%)


Excellent demonstration of the beginning work with the client Very good demonstration of the beginning work with the client Good demonstration of the beginning work with the client Adequate demonstration of the beginning work with the client. Inadequate demonstration of the beginning work with the client

Demonstrated ability to establish professional rapport (10%)


Excellent demonstration of the ability to establish a professional rapport Very good demonstration of the ability to establish a professional rapport Good demonstration of the ability to establish a professional rapport Adequate demonstration of the ability to establish a professional rapport Limited demonstration of the ability to establish a professional rapport

Demonstrated practice of exploratory assessment skills (20%)


Excellent demonstration of exploratory assessment skills Very good demonstration of exploratory assessment skills Good demonstration of exploratory assessment skills Adequate demonstration of exploratory assessment skills Inadequate demonstration of exploratory assessment skills

Sensitive use of self in response to client discussion and behaviours (20%)


Excellent use of self in response to the client. Very good use of self in response to the client Good use of self in response to the client Adequate use of self in response to the client Inadequate use of self in response to the client.

Demonstrated ability to summarise and close session (20%)


Excellent demonstration of the ability to summarise and close the session Very good demonstration of the ability to summarise and close the session Good demonstration of the ability to summarise and close the session Adequate demonstration of the ability to summarise and close the session Inadequate demonstration of the ability to summarise and close the session
Visual and auditory clarity of submission (5%) Excellent visual and auditory clarity Very good visual and auditory clarity Good visual and auditory clarity Adequate visual and auditory clarity Inadequate visual and auditory clarity


Referencing Style

Submission
Offline Online

Learning Outcomes Assessed
  • Describe and interpret the philosophical assumptions that underpin various approaches to casework and case management
  • Compare and contrast the application of influential social theories to simulated social work case scenarios
  • Select and justify an application of different social work methods to social work case scenarios
  • Apply appropriate cross cultural awareness skills and knowledge to case work and case management contexts with indigenous peoples
  • Analyse their performance from feedback drawn from their involvement in professional learning contexts


Graduate Attributes
  • Communication
  • Problem Solving
  • Critical Thinking
  • Team Work
  • Information Technology Competence
  • Cross Cultural Competence
  • Ethical practice

3 Written Assessment

Assessment Title
Assessment task 3—Written critique/analysis of case work or case management session (individual submission of 1500 words)

Task Description

Focus statement:

A written critique showing evidence of your capacity to engage in both academic analysis and professional reflective and reflexive practice.


Your role:

Imagine you are a student on placement who has completed an initial individual casework or case management session and have been asked to undertake a formal written analysis of that experience for the purposes of supervision.


Context:

It is important to remember that there is no ‘perfect’ session in case work or case management. Nor is there one single formula for demonstrating effective helping - it is a range of things including securing good physical space, time, presence, knowledge, values, and skills combining to create an atmosphere where clients make decisions about continuing to work alongside you. Therefore, after any client contact it is essential to ‘walk through’ the observations, thoughts, emotions, atmosphere, conversation, behaviors, and outcomes that transpired in order to plan what the next contact may look and sound like.


Product/performance:

You are to provide a critique: a formal academic and professional analysis of the strengths and limitations of your work in Assessment task # 2 against the published literature of best practice in case work and case management. At least one part of this submission must include general examples of what might need to be done differently informed by your learning about cross-cultural competence. Part of this critique must also address your own reflective practice or the strengths and limitations of your ‘use of self’ in the beginning phases of work such as but not limited to: your non-verbal communication, verbal communication, the impacts of the clients on your values, your values and their impact on the client, shortfalls in knowledge, and the skills utilised in the beginning phases of this working relationship. This submission also asks you to address reflexive practice which is the future action you will be taking on next contact with the client based on the work you have completed in reflective practice


Word Count: 1500 words. The word count is considered from the first word of the introduction to the last word of the conclusion. It excludes the cover page, abstract, contents page and reference list. It includes in-text references and direct quotations


Assessment Due Date

Week 12 Monday (1 Jun 2020) 5:00 pm AEST

Ensure assessment has detailed cover sheet


Return Date to Students

Exam Week Monday (15 Jun 2020)


Weighting
40%

Assessment Criteria

Assessment criteria for written critique/analysis

Assessment 3 High Distinction 85 – 100% Distinction 75 – 84% Credit 65 – 74% Pass 50 – 64% Fail 0 – 49%

Application of knowledge about the casework or case management methods derived from the literature of social work and human services (30%)

Excellent application of casework and case management methods derived from the literature Very good application of casework and case management methods derived from the literature Good application of casework and case management methods derived from the literature Adequate application of casework and case management methods derived from the literature Inadequate application of casework and case management methods derived from the literature

Application of knowledge about cultural sensitivity that contrasts with mainstream texts and publications (10%)

Excellent application of knowledge about culturally sensitive practice and contrasting with mainstream text and publications


Very good application of knowledge about culturally sensitive practice and contrasting with mainstream text and publications


Good application of knowledge about culturally sensitive practice and contrasting with mainstream text and publications


Adequate application of knowledge about culturally sensitive practice and contrasting with mainstream text and publications


Inadequate application of knowledge about culturally sensitive practice and contrasting with mainstream text and publications


Demonstration of social work values and ethics (20%)

Excellent demonstration of social work values and ethics

Very good demonstration of social work values and ethics

Good demonstration of social work values and ethics

Adequate demonstration of social work values and ethics

Limited demonstration social work values and ethics

Detail and quality of reflective and reflexive practice (30%)

Excellent detail and quality of reflective and reflexive practice Very good detail and quality of reflective and reflexive practice Good detail and quality of reflective and reflexive practice Adequate detail and quality of reflective and reflexive practice Inadequate detail and quality of reflective and reflexive practice

Adherence to author-date referencing system (5%)

Excellent adherence to author date referencing system.

Very good adherence to author date referencing system.

Good adherence to author date referencing system.

Adequate adherence to author date referencing system.

Inadequate adherence to author date referencing system.


Breadth and quality of material evident in final reference list (5%) Excellent evidence of reference material Very good evidence of reference material Good evidence of reference material Adequate evidence of reference material Inadequate evidence of reference material


Referencing Style

Submission
Online

Submission Instructions
Generate a personal coversheet containing your name, student number and word count excluding reference list.

Learning Outcomes Assessed
  • Compare and contrast the application of influential social theories to simulated social work case scenarios
  • Select and justify an application of different social work methods to social work case scenarios
  • Apply appropriate cross cultural awareness skills and knowledge to case work and case management contexts with indigenous peoples
  • Analyse their performance from feedback drawn from their involvement in professional learning contexts


Graduate Attributes
  • Communication

Academic Integrity Statement

As a CQUniversity student you are expected to act honestly in all aspects of your academic work.

Any assessable work undertaken or submitted for review or assessment must be your own work. Assessable work is any type of work you do to meet the assessment requirements in the unit, including draft work submitted for review and feedback and final work to be assessed.

When you use the ideas, words or data of others in your assessment, you must thoroughly and clearly acknowledge the source of this information by using the correct referencing style for your unit. Using others’ work without proper acknowledgement may be considered a form of intellectual dishonesty.

Participating honestly, respectfully, responsibly, and fairly in your university study ensures the CQUniversity qualification you earn will be valued as a true indication of your individual academic achievement and will continue to receive the respect and recognition it deserves.

As a student, you are responsible for reading and following CQUniversity’s policies, including the Student Academic Integrity Policy and Procedure. This policy sets out CQUniversity’s expectations of you to act with integrity, examples of academic integrity breaches to avoid, the processes used to address alleged breaches of academic integrity, and potential penalties.

What is a breach of academic integrity?

A breach of academic integrity includes but is not limited to plagiarism, self-plagiarism, collusion, cheating, contract cheating, and academic misconduct. The Student Academic Integrity Policy and Procedure defines what these terms mean and gives examples.

Why is academic integrity important?

A breach of academic integrity may result in one or more penalties, including suspension or even expulsion from the University. It can also have negative implications for student visas and future enrolment at CQUniversity or elsewhere. Students who engage in contract cheating also risk being blackmailed by contract cheating services.

Where can I get assistance?

For academic advice and guidance, the Academic Learning Centre (ALC) can support you in becoming confident in completing assessments with integrity and of high standard.

What can you do to act with integrity?