CQUniversity Unit Profile
SOWK13013 Professional Practice with Children, Youth and Families
Professional Practice with Children, Youth and Families
All details in this unit profile for SOWK13013 have been officially approved by CQUniversity and represent a learning partnership between the University and you (our student).
The information will not be changed unless absolutely necessary and any change will be clearly indicated by an approved correction included in the profile.
General Information

Overview

Students should be able to critically analyse the issues and practices for social and welfare workers working with children, young people and families. Participants should be able to explore issues for practice emerging from the multidimensional genesis of child maltreatment and youth at risk with particular relevance to indigenous and other cultural difference. Students should be able to analyse evidence based strategies for appropriate intervention in different contexts. Students will be required to collate feedback on their professional performance from their lecturer and from other sources, evaluate this feedback and include appropriate strategies in their learning agreements for Fieldwork Education 2.

Details

Career Level: Undergraduate
Unit Level: Level 3
Credit Points: 6
Student Contribution Band: 10
Fraction of Full-Time Student Load: 0.125

Pre-requisites or Co-requisites

Successful completion of 48 credit points in any course.

Important note: Students enrolled in a subsequent unit who failed their pre-requisite unit, should drop the subsequent unit before the census date or within 10 working days of Fail grade notification. Students who do not drop the unit in this timeframe cannot later drop the unit without academic and financial liability. See details in the Assessment Policy and Procedure (Higher Education Coursework).

Offerings For Term 2 - 2020

Online

Attendance Requirements

All on-campus students are expected to attend scheduled classes – in some units, these classes are identified as a mandatory (pass/fail) component and attendance is compulsory. International students, on a student visa, must maintain a full time study load and meet both attendance and academic progress requirements in each study period (satisfactory attendance for International students is defined as maintaining at least an 80% attendance record).

Class and Assessment Overview

Recommended Student Time Commitment

Each 6-credit Undergraduate unit at CQUniversity requires an overall time commitment of an average of 12.5 hours of study per week, making a total of 150 hours for the unit.

Class Timetable

Bundaberg, Cairns, Emerald, Gladstone, Mackay, Rockhampton, Townsville
Adelaide, Brisbane, Melbourne, Perth, Sydney

Assessment Overview

1. Written Assessment
Weighting: 40%
2. Written Assessment
Weighting: 60%

Assessment Grading

This is a graded unit: your overall grade will be calculated from the marks or grades for each assessment task, based on the relative weightings shown in the table above. You must obtain an overall mark for the unit of at least 50%, or an overall grade of ‘pass’ in order to pass the unit. If any ‘pass/fail’ tasks are shown in the table above they must also be completed successfully (‘pass’ grade). You must also meet any minimum mark requirements specified for a particular assessment task, as detailed in the ‘assessment task’ section (note that in some instances, the minimum mark for a task may be greater than 50%). Consult the University’s Grades and Results Policy for more details of interim results and final grades.

Previous Student Feedback

Feedback, Recommendations and Responses

Every unit is reviewed for enhancement each year. At the most recent review, the following staff and student feedback items were identified and recommendations were made.

Feedback from Student evaluations and feedback.

Feedback

Ensure feedback on assessments provide clarity and focus for learning.

Recommendation

Consideration given to providing feedback through feedback studio to improve specificity and targeted responses from the marker.

Unit Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this unit, you will be able to:
  1. Evaluate the historical construction of ideas and practices of working with children, young people and families including the emergence of the notion of the best interests of the child, child focussed and child inclusive practice.
  2. Analyse practice issues relevant to statutory practice with children, young people and families in a range of settings including youth justice, child protection, family law and mental health.
  3. Identify and develop specific skills required to assess harm and risk of harm when working with children, young people and families, including in a statutory context.
  4. Critically evaluate relevant social and welfare practice strategies to support families where there are protective and / or offending issues.
  5. Display the skills of cultural competency including working with indigenous children, young people and families.
  6. Evaluate your performance from feedback drawn from your involvement in professional learning contexts.
Alignment of Learning Outcomes, Assessment and Graduate Attributes
N/A Level
Introductory Level
Intermediate Level
Graduate Level
Professional Level
Advanced Level

Alignment of Assessment Tasks to Learning Outcomes

Assessment Tasks Learning Outcomes
1 2 3 4 5 6
1 - Written Assessment - 40%
2 - Written Assessment - 60%

Alignment of Graduate Attributes to Learning Outcomes

Graduate Attributes Learning Outcomes
1 2 3 4 5 6
1 - Communication
2 - Problem Solving
3 - Critical Thinking
4 - Information Literacy
5 - Team Work
6 - Information Technology Competence
7 - Cross Cultural Competence
8 - Ethical practice
9 - Social Innovation

Alignment of Assessment Tasks to Graduate Attributes

Assessment Tasks Graduate Attributes
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
1 - Written Assessment - 40%
2 - Written Assessment - 60%
Textbooks and Resources

Textbooks

Prescribed

Understanding Child and Family Welfare: Statutory Responses to Children at Risk (2012)

Authors: Connolly, M. and Morris, K.
Palgrave Macmillian
Basingstoke Basingstoke , UK
ISBN: 13:978-0-230-25019-2
Binding: Paperback

Additional Textbook Information

If you prefer to study with a paper copy you can purchase at the CQUni Bookshop here: http://bookshop.cqu.edu.au (search on the Unit code). eBooks can be purchased at the publisher's website.

IT Resources

You will need access to the following IT resources:
  • CQUniversity Student Email
  • Internet
  • Unit Website (Moodle)
  • Computer with microphone and camera for zoom tutorials
Referencing Style

All submissions for this unit must use the referencing style: Harvard (author-date)

For further information, see the Assessment Tasks.

Teaching Contacts
Fotina Hardy Unit Coordinator
f.hardy@cqu.edu.au
Shirley Ledger Unit Coordinator
s.ledger@cqu.edu.au
Schedule
Week 1 Begin Date: 13 Jul 2020

Module/Topic

Introduction to SOWK13013

Underpinning theory, discourse and constructs

Chapter

Moodle - Week 1 Introduction to SOWK13013

Chapter 1 (Connolly and Morris, 2012)

Rogers, W.S (2001). Chapter 3, pp. 26-33, in "Children in society: contemporary theory, policy and practice"

Tilbury, C (2007) Chapter 5, pp. 80-100, in "Good practice in child protection"

Events and Submissions/Topic

Introduction to SOWK13013 Moodle book and recorded lectures

Week 2 Begin Date: 20 Jul 2020

Module/Topic

Legislative frameworks and Best Interests of the Child Principle

Chapter

Chapter 2 (Connolly and Morris, 2012)

Keddell, E. (2017). Interpreting children’s best interests: Needs, attachment and decision-making. Journal of Social Work, 17(3), 324–342. 

Lorraine Read (1999) Responding to child abuse: A review of models and practice, Australian Social Work, 52:3, 43-50

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 3 Begin Date: 27 Jul 2020

Module/Topic

The Social Worker in Context -  Child Protection Systems

After the Apology

Chapter

Chapter 5 & 7 (Connolly and Morris, 2012)

Bob Lonne, Maria Harries, Sarah Lantz, Workforce Development: A Pathway to Reforming Child Protection Systems in Australia, The British Journal of Social Work, Volume 43, Issue 8, December 2013, Pages 1630–1648

Knight, Aimee. 'Don't do it again': Hearing, seeing and deep listening in 'after the apology' [online]. Metro Magazine: Media & Education Magazine, No. 196, May 2018: 70-75.   [cited 16 Jun 20].

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 4 Begin Date: 03 Aug 2020

Module/Topic

Assessment and Responses in Child and Family Practice

Child Development Theories

Chapter

Chapter 1 of Daniel, B, Wassell, S, Gilligan, R, & Howe, D 2010, Child Development for Child Care and Protection Workers : Second Edition, Jessica Kingsley Publishers, London. Available from: ProQuest Ebook Central. [15 June 2020].

Chapter 3 (Connolly and Morris, 2012)

Events and Submissions/Topic

Child Abuse and Harm Moodle Book (Australian definitions)

Week 5 Begin Date: 10 Aug 2020

Module/Topic

Attachment Theory

Ecological Systems Theory

Chapter

Chapter 6 & 8 (Connolly and Morris, 2012)



Events and Submissions/Topic

Assessment 1 "Best Interests of the Child Principle" Essay Due 

Attachment Theory Moodle Book



Best Interests of the Child Principle - Essay 1600 words Due: Week 5 Friday (14 Aug 2020) 6:00 pm AEST
Vacation Week Begin Date: 17 Aug 2020

Module/Topic

Chapter

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 6 Begin Date: 24 Aug 2020

Module/Topic

Trauma Informed Care for Social Workers

Early Brain Development and Trauma

Chapter

Jill Levenson, Trauma-Informed Social Work Practice, Social Work, Volume 62, Issue 2, April 2017, Pages 105–113,

Library Reading List

Resources on Moodle

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 7 Begin Date: 31 Aug 2020

Module/Topic

Practice Perspectives - Domestic and Family Violence

Chapter

Library Reading List

Resources on Moodle

Events and Submissions/Topic


Week 8 Begin Date: 07 Sep 2020

Module/Topic

Practice Perspectives - Engagement and Working with Families

Chapter

Chapter 4 (Connolly and Morris, 2012)

Library Reading List

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 9 Begin Date: 14 Sep 2020

Module/Topic

Working with Young People

Chapter

Library Reading List

Working Ecologically with Young People - Resources on Moodle

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 10 Begin Date: 21 Sep 2020

Module/Topic

Reports and Courts

Chapter

Moodle Book - Reports and Courts

Library Reading List

Lectures and resources on Moodle

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 11 Begin Date: 28 Sep 2020

Module/Topic

Evidence Based Practice

Chapter

Moodle Book - Evidence Based Practice

Library Reading List

Lectures and resources on Moodle

Events and Submissions/Topic

Assessment 2 Due


Case Study Assessment Due: Week 11 Friday (2 Oct 2020) 6:00 pm AEST
Week 12 Begin Date: 05 Oct 2020

Module/Topic

Reflective Practice 

Chapter

Library Reading List

Sicora, Alessandro. "The Never-ending Cycle of Reflective Practice." In Reflective Practice, 7-42. Bristol: Bristol University Press, 2017. Accessed June 16, 2020. doi:10.2307/j.ctt1t88z4v.7.

Events and Submissions/Topic

Review/Exam Week Begin Date: 12 Oct 2020

Module/Topic

Chapter

Events and Submissions/Topic

Exam Week Begin Date: 19 Oct 2020

Module/Topic

Chapter

Events and Submissions/Topic

Assessment Tasks

1 Written Assessment

Assessment Title
Best Interests of the Child Principle - Essay 1600 words

Task Description

Task Description

One of the most influential instruments underpinning child and family practice, is the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC; 1989). This globally applied instrument provides comprehensive minimum standards for the treatment of all children providing consensus that all children have a right to protection, to participation, to personal development and basic material provision.  Article 3 enshrines the best interests of the child principle as fundamental for all authorities in matters concerning children. Social workers in child and family practice contexts work within statutory and legislative contexts and how this principle is applied can raise dilemmas and challenges. There are numerous examples of where the principle has been misused or where tensions arise in upholding it. Social workers must be adept at critiquing practice contexts and how they impact on the aims of the profession (refer to AASW Code of Ethics 2010).  Like many other legal concepts social workers must understand, there is a need to understand where this principle informs practice and how upholding it is critical to achieving the aims and goals of the profession. 

This assessment  intends to strengthen student capacity to understand and respond to the rights of children and young people in their chosen practice context.


* Choose one of the following practice fields:

i. Child Protection

ii. Family Law

iii. Youth Justice

iv. Domestic and Family Violence


1. Identify an organisational context where this field of practice occurs.

2. Briefly outline how and where the UNCRC 1989 connects to this practice context. State the relevant legislation and practice guidelines / frameworks with regard to this specific practice context.

3. Define and discuss the best interests of the child principle outlining the relevant frameworks or approaches implemented in the chosen practice context (eg. restorative justice in youth justice).  Identify the relevant theoretical underpinnings of these frameworks or approaches.

4. What are some of the challenges or dilemmas for social workers when seeking to uphold the best interests of the child principle in this context?

4. Identify a strategy or legislative response utilised to uphold the best interests of the child principle when working with children and families identifying from CALD or Indigenous backgrounds. 


Word Limit

1600 words

The word count is considered from the first word of the introduction to the last word of the conclusion. It excludes the cover page, abstract, contents page, reference list and appendices. It includes in-text references and direct quotations.


Weighting

40%



Assessment Due Date

Week 5 Friday (14 Aug 2020) 6:00 pm AEST

Submission on moodle


Return Date to Students

Week 7 Monday (31 Aug 2020)

Feedback via moodle


Weighting
40%

Assessment Criteria

Criteria

HD 

(85 - 100%)

D

(75 - 84%)

C

(65 - 74%)

P

(50 - 64%)

F

(<50%)

Demonstrate capacity to analyse how practice context including issues and dilemmas impacts on maintaining the best interest of the child.(30%)

 

Highly developed capacity to analyse contexts and their impact on practice

Well-developed capacity to analyse contexts and  their impact on practice

Good analysis contexts and their impact on practice

Adequate skills to analyse contexts and their impact on practice

Inadequate or inaccurate analysis of practice contexts and their impact on practice

Ability to develop appropriate strategic responses and articulate the theoretical frameworks underpinning this development (30%)

Highly developed capacity to develop appropriate strategic responses and articulate their theoretical underpinnings

Well-developed capacity to develop appropriate strategic responses and articulate their theoretical underpinnings

 

Good capacity to develop appropriate strategic responses and articulate their theoretical underpinnings

 

Adequate capacity to develop appropriate strategic responses and articulate their theoretical underpinnings

 

Inadequate capacity to develop appropriate strategic responses and articulate their theoretical underpinnings

 

 

Research and apply knowledge of major theories and perspectives related to children and young people’s needs and development within this context (30%)

 

Evidence of an extensive and highly relevant range of literature related to theory consulted and applied in addition to the set readings

Evidence of some authoritative sources, as well as a good range of theory integration applied in addition to the set readings

Evidence of a good range of sources consulted and applied with major theories identified in addition to the set readings

Adequate consultation of literature with pertinent theories identified and discussed in addition to the set readings

Evidence of consulting only set readings and does not identify major theories or perspectives related to children’s needs or inaccurately describes main concepts in essay.

Ability to produce a well written and structured analysis within word limit showing appropriate grammar, spelling and referencing (10%)

Extremely well written and critically analysed essay; logically sequenced with grammatical, spelling and referencing accuracy within word limit

Very well written and constructed, logically sequenced paper; very good presentation; grammatical, spelling and referencing accuracy; within word limit

Well written and constructed logically sequenced paper; good presentation; grammatical spelling and referencing accuracy; within word limit

Basic level of written expression and construction; acceptable grammar, spelling and basic level of referencing within word limit

Poorly written and presented with inaccuracies in written expression, and / or poor referencing with frequent errors.


Referencing Style

Submission
Online

Submission Instructions
Online in moodle

Learning Outcomes Assessed
  • Analyse practice issues relevant to statutory practice with children, young people and families in a range of settings including youth justice, child protection, family law and mental health.
  • Identify and develop specific skills required to assess harm and risk of harm when working with children, young people and families, including in a statutory context.
  • Critically evaluate relevant social and welfare practice strategies to support families where there are protective and / or offending issues.
  • Display the skills of cultural competency including working with indigenous children, young people and families.
  • Evaluate your performance from feedback drawn from your involvement in professional learning contexts.


Graduate Attributes
  • Communication
  • Problem Solving
  • Critical Thinking
  • Information Literacy
  • Team Work
  • Information Technology Competence
  • Cross Cultural Competence
  • Ethical practice

2 Written Assessment

Assessment Title
Case Study Assessment

Task Description

Case Study

The case study will be posted to Moodle

Purpose

Developing a conceptual framework for assessment, planning and intervention in child protection and welfare settings is central to effective professional practice. Social workers must demonstrate ability to effectively articulate their assessments based on a sound evidence-based framework for practice. An understanding of the roles and responsibilities of social workers in this area, knowledge and understanding of current theory related to child abuse, neglect and co-existing issues for families’ forms components of this framework. An understanding of risk and protective factors, developmental theories, child needs and evidence informed culturally safe practice is also relevant to the social worker in this context.

You will have the opportunity to apply a child centered, family focused framework drawing from literature in the unit, to the case in a case study report.

Performance/products

Students will prepare an assessment report (relevant to their State or Territory) informed by the learning in this unit and broader research (evidence-based practice) inclusive of social work theories to examine the case and identify primary issues and risks while addressing the following:

* An overview of the presenting issues and family constellations, dynamics and relationships and precipitating incidents or events relevant to the case.

* An overview of the particular needs, harms, indicators of harm and types of harm for each child identified in the case study. This section should include reference to literature to support your assessment. 

* A discussion or analysis section referring to relevant literature and knowledge related to child and family development, trauma theory, attachment theories and ecological systems theory.   

* Include a labelled genogram of the family constellation in the case

* Your report should refer to relevant legislation in your State or Territory


1800 words excluding reference list, genogram and tables or figures - The word count is considered from the first word of the introduction to the last word of the conclusion. It excludes the cover page, abstract, contents page, reference list and appendices. It includes in-text references and direct quotations.

Headings may be used in the report.


Weighting

60%



Assessment Due Date

Week 11 Friday (2 Oct 2020) 6:00 pm AEST

Submission via moodle


Return Date to Students

Exam Week Monday (19 Oct 2020)


Weighting
60%

Minimum mark or grade
Must pass (50%) to pass the unit

Assessment Criteria

Criteria                                                                                    SOWK13013 A 2 Grade
High Distinction 85 - 100% Distinction 75 - 84%
Credit 65 -74%
Pass 50 - 64%
Fail 0 - 49%

Demonstrated ability to apply contemporary frameworks and knowledge for child protection practice, and explain the rationale for and implications of assessment which take account of differing child and family circumstances (20%)

A clearly defined and evidence-based framework for practice is adopted with highly developed knowledge of the family circumstances and analysis of assessment A well-defined and evidence-based framework for practice is incorporated and connected to very good knowledge of the family circumstances for assessment The framework for practice is clear with evidence of a well explained rationale for assessment inclusive of and identifying the primary needs and risks for each family member. Elements of an evidence-based framework for practice is adopted with identification of primary issues, needs and concerns are identified There is an absence of framework for practice or the rationale for interventions is incorrectly identified or omitted or relevant circumstances have not been identified or incorrectly identified and risk / needs are not considered adequately.

The discussion or analysis section identifies relevant literature and knowledge related to child and family development, trauma theory, attachment theories and ecological systems theory.

(30%)

The report presents evidence of superior research and analysis drawing from contemporary child and family work practice The report presents evidence of a high level of integration of research and knowledge from contemporary works in child and family practice The report presents a coherent and evidence based analysis of the core theories and knowledge relevant to the case study The report identifies and explains the relevance of child and family development and trauma perspectives including identifies attachment needs of the children and the family is viewed from an ecological perspective The report fails to accurately or appropriately identify relevant theories, knowledge or fails to refer to trauma or attachment needs of the children 

Demonstrated identification of children's needs, family strengths and harms.

(40%)

The case report is professionally presented and is written clearly and concisely. All child protection concerns are identified along with strengths and needs producing a report that requires no or minimal feedback. The case report is well presented and describes all required details consistently and effectively. The major child protection concerns are identified along with primary strengths and needs producing a report that requires some feedback or correction only. The case report is well presented identifies the primary concerns, strengths needs and is logically constructed. There are few corrections or additions required. The case report is adequately presented with primary concerns, needs and general identification of strengths referred to. The omissions or incorrect statements do not result in risk of harm to a child and any errors do not impact on the overall assessment. The case report does not adhere to the template provide or is difficult to follow. Concerns, strengths and needs are either not represented or identified or the report incorrectly or inadequately explains basic information required to formulate an assessment. Significant feedback / corrections are required to address the report failures.

Demonstrated evaluation of the ethical, organisational, cultural and contextual obligations in the case (10%)

The contextual obligations are incorporated into the report inclusive of tensions in ethics, legislative requirements, cultural considerations and an exceptional analysis of these issues produces a report requiring no or minor correction. The contextual obligations are incorporated into the report where required identifying primary ethical, organizational and cultural obligations in the case. There are only minor or minimal corrections or additions required. The legislative and ethical obligations of the case are identified. Cultural considerations are represented in the intervention plan and basic analysis of the context is presented. There are some areas that could be addressed however they do not impact on the overall quality of the report. Obligations are addressed in the report with reference to ethical requirements and identification of primary cultural and legislative obligations. There are significant omissions or errors of context in the report. The report is unethical or excludes reference to cultural / legislative / organizational responses. The report is significantly impacted by these exclusions and or is poorly written and requires major correction or changes.


Referencing Style

Submission
Online

Submission Instructions
Online submission in moodle

Learning Outcomes Assessed
  • Evaluate the historical construction of ideas and practices of working with children, young people and families including the emergence of the notion of the best interests of the child, child focussed and child inclusive practice.
  • Analyse practice issues relevant to statutory practice with children, young people and families in a range of settings including youth justice, child protection, family law and mental health.
  • Critically evaluate relevant social and welfare practice strategies to support families where there are protective and / or offending issues.
  • Display the skills of cultural competency including working with indigenous children, young people and families.
  • Evaluate your performance from feedback drawn from your involvement in professional learning contexts.


Graduate Attributes
  • Communication
  • Problem Solving
  • Critical Thinking
  • Information Literacy
  • Cross Cultural Competence
  • Ethical practice

Academic Integrity Statement

As a CQUniversity student you are expected to act honestly in all aspects of your academic work.

Any assessable work undertaken or submitted for review or assessment must be your own work. Assessable work is any type of work you do to meet the assessment requirements in the unit, including draft work submitted for review and feedback and final work to be assessed.

When you use the ideas, words or data of others in your assessment, you must thoroughly and clearly acknowledge the source of this information by using the correct referencing style for your unit. Using others’ work without proper acknowledgement may be considered a form of intellectual dishonesty.

Participating honestly, respectfully, responsibly, and fairly in your university study ensures the CQUniversity qualification you earn will be valued as a true indication of your individual academic achievement and will continue to receive the respect and recognition it deserves.

As a student, you are responsible for reading and following CQUniversity’s policies, including the Student Academic Integrity Policy and Procedure. This policy sets out CQUniversity’s expectations of you to act with integrity, examples of academic integrity breaches to avoid, the processes used to address alleged breaches of academic integrity, and potential penalties.

What is a breach of academic integrity?

A breach of academic integrity includes but is not limited to plagiarism, self-plagiarism, collusion, cheating, contract cheating, and academic misconduct. The Student Academic Integrity Policy and Procedure defines what these terms mean and gives examples.

Why is academic integrity important?

A breach of academic integrity may result in one or more penalties, including suspension or even expulsion from the University. It can also have negative implications for student visas and future enrolment at CQUniversity or elsewhere. Students who engage in contract cheating also risk being blackmailed by contract cheating services.

Where can I get assistance?

For academic advice and guidance, the Academic Learning Centre (ALC) can support you in becoming confident in completing assessments with integrity and of high standard.

What can you do to act with integrity?