CQUniversity Unit Profile
SPCH12006 Linguistics
Linguistics
All details in this unit profile for SPCH12006 have been officially approved by CQUniversity and represent a learning partnership between the University and you (our student).
The information will not be changed unless absolutely necessary and any change will be clearly indicated by an approved correction included in the profile.
General Information

Overview

This unit will introduce you to the core linguistic components of English speakers' communication, including morphology, syntax, phonology, semantics and pragmatics. You will learn about the basic units and normal grammatical patterns of English speakers, including how people process language, encode meaning and communicate on a day to day basis. You will develop an understanding of the acquisition of language, its role in communication, and how the social or cultural environment interacts with language. You will then apply this knowledge to identify people with communication disorders versus people with culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds.

Details

Career Level: Undergraduate
Unit Level: Level 2
Credit Points: 6
Student Contribution Band: 8
Fraction of Full-Time Student Load: 0.125

Pre-requisites or Co-requisites

There are no requisites for this unit.

Important note: Students enrolled in a subsequent unit who failed their pre-requisite unit, should drop the subsequent unit before the census date or within 10 working days of Fail grade notification. Students who do not drop the unit in this timeframe cannot later drop the unit without academic and financial liability. See details in the Assessment Policy and Procedure (Higher Education Coursework).

Offerings For Term 2 - 2019

Rockhampton

Attendance Requirements

All on-campus students are expected to attend scheduled classes – in some units, these classes are identified as a mandatory (pass/fail) component and attendance is compulsory. International students, on a student visa, must maintain a full time study load and meet both attendance and academic progress requirements in each study period (satisfactory attendance for International students is defined as maintaining at least an 80% attendance record).

Class and Assessment Overview

Recommended Student Time Commitment

Each 6-credit Undergraduate unit at CQUniversity requires an overall time commitment of an average of 12.5 hours of study per week, making a total of 150 hours for the unit.

Class Timetable

Bundaberg, Cairns, Emerald, Gladstone, Mackay, Rockhampton, Townsville
Adelaide, Brisbane, Melbourne, Perth, Sydney

Assessment Overview

1. In-class Test(s)
Weighting: 30%
2. Written Assessment
Weighting: 35%
3. Written Assessment
Weighting: 35%

Assessment Grading

This is a graded unit: your overall grade will be calculated from the marks or grades for each assessment task, based on the relative weightings shown in the table above. You must obtain an overall mark for the unit of at least 50%, or an overall grade of ‘pass’ in order to pass the unit. If any ‘pass/fail’ tasks are shown in the table above they must also be completed successfully (‘pass’ grade). You must also meet any minimum mark requirements specified for a particular assessment task, as detailed in the ‘assessment task’ section (note that in some instances, the minimum mark for a task may be greater than 50%). Consult the University’s Grades and Results Policy for more details of interim results and final grades.

Previous Student Feedback

Feedback, Recommendations and Responses

Every unit is reviewed for enhancement each year. At the most recent review, the following staff and student feedback items were identified and recommendations were made.

Feedback from Have Your Say student satisfaction survey

Feedback

Students provided highly complimentary feedback regarding tutorials, reporting that they were extremely practical, interactive, fun and helpful in terms of clarifying information and assisting students to learn.

Recommendation

Regular tutorials will continue to be provided to students with the intention of complementing and further clarifying the lecture content and providing students with the opportunity to improve their understanding of this content.

Feedback from Have Your Say student satisfaction survey and analysis of Echo 306 analytics data

Feedback

Some students reported that the recorded lectures were useful, well presented and included clear information and examples that were easy to follow. Several students however felt that these lectures were too long, that they were difficult to watch, and/or that the lecturer was a 'wasted resource' as the students self-reportedly did not prioritise the lectures and therefore chose not to view them.

Recommendation

The unit coordinator will endeavour to make it clear to students at all possible opportunities, including on the Moodle site, in the unit profile and in class, that tutorials are considered supplementary to the recorded lectures, and that it is these lectures that contain the key content which must be understood in order to pass the unit. The correlation between the level of engagement with the recorded lectures and the overall level of success in completing the unit will also be explained to students and they will be encouraged to take responsibility for their learning. In addition, although the lectures are recorded and available through the Moodle site and can be accessed at any time that is convenient for each student, a time slot for viewing these lectures will be allocated and included on the timetable, to assist students with their weekly time management. Both the students and the lecturer will also be encouraged to make full use of the interactive features that Echo 360 has to offer, in an effort to help students engage more effectively with the lecture content.

Feedback from Have Your Say student satisfaction survey

Feedback

Students generally reported that although the assessment tasks were challenging, they were worthwhile, and students learnt a great deal from them. Some students however felt that parts of the assessment tasks were too complex, especially for students who were only in their first year of university, and reported that some of the requirements should have been modified and the instructions made clearer.

Recommendation

The unit coordinator will consult with the lecturer and the Head of the Course (Speech Pathology) when planning for 2019, and will make any adjustments to the assessment tasks that are considered necessary to ensure that they are appropriate for students enrolled in the first year of the course. Students will continue to be supported throughout the term by both the lecturer and the unit coordinator and will be encouraged to seek additional support and advice if required.

Unit Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this unit, you will be able to:
  1. Describe and analyse the core linguistic components of morphology, syntax, phonology, semantics, and pragmatics within a speech pathology context
  2. Identify and analyse simple and complex English words and sentences using basic syntactic and morphological analysis skills
  3. Analyse communication skills with regard to language content, comprehension, processing and use
  4. Apply an introductory level of linguistic knowledge to describe communication across culturally and linguistically diverse settings.

Competency in linguistic analysis of communication samples is a foundation skill that is necessary for success as a practising speech pathologist. The following information describes the range of practice areas and competencies that are linked to this unit's learning outcomes, content and/or and assessments:

  • Speech Pathology Range of Practice Areas: Language and Multi-Modal Communication (Child and Adult)

  • Competencies: The learning outcomes in this unit contribute to the development of clinical and professional competencies as outlined by Speech Pathology Australia.

Alignment of Learning Outcomes, Assessment and Graduate Attributes
N/A Level
Introductory Level
Intermediate Level
Graduate Level
Professional Level
Advanced Level

Alignment of Assessment Tasks to Learning Outcomes

Assessment Tasks Learning Outcomes
1 2 3 4
1 - Written Assessment - 35%
2 - In-class Test(s) - 30%
3 - Written Assessment - 35%

Alignment of Graduate Attributes to Learning Outcomes

Graduate Attributes Learning Outcomes
1 2 3 4
1 - Communication
2 - Problem Solving
3 - Critical Thinking
4 - Information Literacy
5 - Team Work
6 - Information Technology Competence
7 - Cross Cultural Competence
8 - Ethical practice
9 - Social Innovation

Alignment of Assessment Tasks to Graduate Attributes

Assessment Tasks Graduate Attributes
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
1 - Written Assessment - 35%
2 - In-class Test(s) - 30%
3 - Written Assessment - 35%
Textbooks and Resources

Textbooks

Prescribed

Introductory Linguistics for Speech and Language Therapy Practice First (2013)

Authors: Jan McAllister and Jim Miller
John Wiley and Sons Ltd
Malden Malden , MA , USA
ISBN: 978-0-470-67110-8
Binding: Paperback

IT Resources

You will need access to the following IT resources:
  • CQUniversity Student Email
  • Internet
  • Unit Website (Moodle)
Referencing Style

All submissions for this unit must use the referencing style: American Psychological Association 6th Edition (APA 6th edition)

For further information, see the Assessment Tasks.

Teaching Contacts
Leisa Skinner Unit Coordinator
l.skinner@cqu.edu.au
Schedule
Week 1 Begin Date: 15 Jul 2019

Module/Topic

About languages

Linguistic impacts on SLP resources and practices

Language structures

Introduction to word classes

Language and meaning

Words and non-words

Chapter

McAllister, J. & Miller, J. (2013). Introductory Linguistics for Speech and Language Therapy Practice. West Sussex, UK: John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. 

  • Chapters 1, 2 & 5

Additional reading tasks may be set by your lecturer and/or tutor.

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 2 Begin Date: 22 Jul 2019

Module/Topic

About languages

Language relatedness and diversity

Language structures

Word structure and formation and MLU

Language and meaning

Word meaning: lexemes and concepts and techniques for analysing their meaning

Chapter

McAllister, J. & Miller, J. (2013). Introductory Linguistics for Speech and Language Therapy Practice. West Sussex, UK: John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • Chapters 3 & 6

Additional reading tasks may be set by your lecturer and/or tutor.

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 3 Begin Date: 29 Jul 2019

Module/Topic

About languages

Languages commonly spoken in Australia

Language structures

A closer look at characteristics of some word classes

Language and meaning

Sentence meaning

Chapter

McAllister, J. & Miller, J. (2013). Introductory Linguistics for Speech and Language Therapy Practice. West Sussex, UK: John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • Chapters 4 & 5 

Additional reading tasks may be set by your lecturer and/or tutor.

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 4 Begin Date: 05 Aug 2019

Module/Topic

About languages

English dialects spoken in Australia

Language structures

Introduction to phrases and clauses

Language and meaning

An introduction to deixis and reference/anaphora

Chapter

McAllister, J. & Miller, J. (2013). Introductory Linguistics for Speech and Language Therapy Practice. West Sussex, UK: John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • Chapters 7 & 11

Additional reading tasks may be set by your lecturer and/or tutor.

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 5 Begin Date: 12 Aug 2019

Module/Topic

About languages

Traditional Australian Indigenous languages

Language structures

Verb variables: tense and aspect; active and passive voice, modals

Language and meaning

More on deixis and reference

Chapter

McAllister, J. & Miller, J. (2013). Introductory Linguistics for Speech and Language Therapy Practice. West Sussex, UK: John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • Chapter 8.4 & 11 

Additional reading tasks may be set by your lecturer and/or tutor.

Events and Submissions/Topic

Vacation Week Begin Date: 19 Aug 2019

Module/Topic

No classes this week

Chapter

No readings

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 6 Begin Date: 26 Aug 2019

Module/Topic

About languages

Contact languages in Australia and elsewhere

Language structures

Basic sentence types: simple sentences

Declarative, imperative, interrogative clauses

Language and meaning

Frames & scripts 

Chapter

McAllister, J. & Miller, J. (2013). Introductory Linguistics for Speech and Language Therapy Practice. West Sussex, UK: John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • Chapters 8 & 12.3 

Additional reading tasks may be set by your lecturer and/or tutor.

Events and Submissions/Topic

Grammatical Analysis In-Class Test Due: Week 6 Friday (30 Aug 2019) 2:00 pm AEST
Week 7 Begin Date: 02 Sep 2019

Module/Topic

About languages

Bilingualism, second language acquisition, learning other languages

Language structures

Subordinate clauses

Language and meaning

Metaphor, irony and humour

Chapter

McAllister, J. & Miller, J. (2013). Introductory Linguistics for Speech and Language Therapy Practice. West Sussex, UK: John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • Chapters 9 & 12.4

Additional reading tasks may be set by your lecturer and/or tutor.

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 8 Begin Date: 09 Sep 2019

Module/Topic

About languages

Multimodal communication and sign languages, AUSLAN

Language structures

Untensed (non-finite) clauses

Language and meaning

Implicature, Explicature, Presupposition


Chapter

McAllister, J. & Miller, J. (2013). Introductory Linguistics for Speech and Language Therapy Practice. West Sussex, UK: John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • Chapters 10 & 12.5-7

Additional reading tasks may be set by your lecturer and/or tutor.

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 9 Begin Date: 16 Sep 2019

Module/Topic

About languages

Language data: demographic data sources, client questionnaires

Language structures

Coherence and cohesion

Language and meaning

Language choices: registers/styles versus other language codes; translanguaging, code-switching; language and identity

Chapter

McAllister, J. & Miller, J. (2013). Introductory Linguistics for Speech and Language Therapy Practice. West Sussex, UK: John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • Chapter 14 

Additional reading tasks may be set by your lecturer and/or tutor.

Events and Submissions/Topic

Analysis of a Language Sample Due: Week 9 Friday (20 Sept 2019) 9:00 pm AEST
Week 10 Begin Date: 23 Sep 2019

Module/Topic

About languages

Untangling natural L2 trajectories, cultural differences and special needs in speech language

Language structures

Information structure: given and new, theme and focus

Language and meaning

Speech acts & conversation

Chapter

McAllister, J. & Miller, J. (2013). Introductory Linguistics for Speech and Language Therapy Practice. West Sussex, UK: John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • Chapters 13 & 15

Additional reading tasks may be set by your lecturer and/or tutor.

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 11 Begin Date: 30 Sep 2019

Module/Topic

About languages

Other language-based professionals

Language structures

Syntax and narrative text organisation

Language and meaning

More on speech acts and conversation

Chapter

McAllister, J. & Miller, J. (2013). Introductory Linguistics for Speech and Language Therapy Practice. West Sussex, UK: John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • Chapters 13 & 16

Additional reading tasks may be set by your lecturer and/or tutor.

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 12 Begin Date: 07 Oct 2019

Module/Topic

This week we will review a range of topics covered throughout the term

Chapter

Specific reading tasks may be set by your lecturer and/or tutor.

Events and Submissions/Topic

Exploring Languages Due: Week 12 Friday (11 Oct 2019) 9:00 pm AEST
Review/Exam Week Begin Date: 14 Oct 2019

Module/Topic

No classes

Chapter

No readings

Events and Submissions/Topic

Exam Week Begin Date: 21 Oct 2019

Module/Topic

No classes

Chapter

No readings

Events and Submissions/Topic

Term Specific Information

For this unit you will have three staff members supporting you throughout the term.

  • Leisa Skinner will be your unit coordinator and will be involved in setting up Moodle and overseeing the unit across the term.
  • Denise Angelo will be your off-campus lecturer who will upload recorded lectures for you to view each week, at a time that is most convenient for you.
  • Harriet Hansler will be your tutor who will run scheduled, face-to-face tutorials with you each week.

The online lectures will contain the main content that is considered key to your success when completing this unit. Time to view these recorded lectures will be included in your term timetable, however as these lectures will be recorded, you will be fortunate enough to be able to access the recordings at any time that is convenient for you. You may also view the recordings as often as you like. 

The tutorials will run on a weekly basis and will be designed to complement the lectures by providing you with additional opportunities to work through and discuss certain concepts with your tutor Harriet. They will NOT be designed to replace or to cover all of the lecture content, so it is imperative that you view the online lectures each week in addition to attending the tutorials. 

Questions regarding the lecture content should be presented to your tutor Harriet in the first instance - she can be contacted via email: h.hansler@cqu.edu.au. If further clarification is needed, Harriet will follow this up with Denise and/or Leisa.

If however you have any specific questions or concerns about the unit itself, these should be directed to your unit coordinator Leisa via email: l.skinner@cqu.edu.au. 

Assessment Tasks

1 In-class Test(s)

Assessment Title
Grammatical Analysis In-Class Test

Task Description

This assessment task will involve testing your ability to complete grammatical analyses in real time during an in-class test. You will be expected to complete a range of tasks addressing the areas of knowledge that have been taught in the lectures prior to the test. This may include (but is not limited to) tasks such as reading through individual sentences and/or passages that are provided to you and:

  • identifying the word classes that specific words belong to
  • identifying specific syntactic phenomena, such as different types of phrases and clauses
  • identifying examples of anaphoric and deictic expressions
  • identifying morphemes  
  • providing clear rationales for your responses to the different tasks

The test will be held in Week 6. You will have 60 minutes to complete the test.


Assessment Due Date

Week 6 Friday (30 Aug 2019) 2:00 pm AEST

The in-class test will commence at 2:00pm on Friday the 30th of August. You should therefore arrive to the class 5-10 minutes early, to ensure that you are ready to start on time. This is a closed book test - this means that any study notes, books or other reference material cannot be used and must remain at the front of the classroom for the duration of the test.


Return Date to Students

Week 8 Friday (13 Sept 2019)

Marks and feedback will be made available via Moodle.


Weighting
30%

Minimum mark or grade
In order to pass this test, a minimum mark of 50% must be achieved. This test must also be passed in order to pass the SPCH12006 unit.

Assessment Criteria

Each question included on the test will be allocated a set number of marks, which will be clearly indicated on the test. The number of marks allocated to each question will be based on the complexity of the task and the amount of information required to answer it accurately and completely. Full marks will be awarded for complete and accurate answers. Partial marks may be awarded in instances where responses are somewhat accurate however require minor clarification. Nil marks will be awarded for any responses that are inaccurate and/or incomplete.

In order to pass this test, a minimum mark of 50% must be achieved. This test must also be passed in order to pass the SPCH12006 unit. 


Referencing Style

Submission

No submission method provided.


Submission Instructions
Students must complete the test in class and hand the test paper directly to the tutor at its completion (after 60 minutes from the time that it commenced).

Learning Outcomes Assessed
  • Describe and analyse the core linguistic components of morphology, syntax, phonology, semantics, and pragmatics within a speech pathology context
  • Identify and analyse simple and complex English words and sentences using basic syntactic and morphological analysis skills


Graduate Attributes
  • Communication
  • Problem Solving
  • Critical Thinking
  • Information Literacy
  • Cross Cultural Competence
  • Ethical practice

2 Written Assessment

Assessment Title
Analysis of a Language Sample

Task Description

This assessment task will require you to view a video recording of an individual speaking, transcribe this orthographically, then analyse the language sample and interpret your findings. Your analysis will focus on four of the core aspects of language - morphology, syntax, semantics and pragmatics. For example, this may include completing tasks such as identifying word classes, morphemes, sentence types, semantic relationships, reference and deixis, and complex verb groups. Some of the tasks you will be required to complete may be similar to that which was covered in the in-class test, however in this assessment piece, these tasks will require a greater depth of analysis and interpretation and will be based on a 'real-life' person's communication sample rather than individual sentences or passages. You will also be required to reflect upon your experiences when completing this assessment task, exploring the specific challenges and the learning that occurred.


Assessment Due Date

Week 9 Friday (20 Sept 2019) 9:00 pm AEST

Assessment tasks are to be submitted via Moodle.


Return Date to Students

Week 11 Friday (4 Oct 2019)

Marks and feedback will be made available via Moodle.


Weighting
35%

Minimum mark or grade
A minimum mark of 50% must be achieved in order to pass this assessment task. This assessment task must be passed in order to pass the SPCH12006 unit.

Assessment Criteria

Specific instructions for this assessment task will be posted on Moodle, including a comprehensive marking rubric. The following is a list of the range of different areas you will be assessed on:

  • Orthographic transcription of a language sample
  • Analysis of the speaker's use and/or understanding of morphology (this will include your ability to accurately complete a number of set tasks, such as identifying different morpheme types and calculating the speaker's Mean Length of Utterance (MLU))
  • Analysis of the speaker's use and/or understanding of syntax (this will include your ability to accurately complete a number of set tasks, such as identifying different sentence types, complex verb groups, and elaborated noun phrases)
  • Analysis of the speaker's use and/or understanding of semantics (this will include your ability to accurately complete a number of set tasks, such as describing the speaker's use of anaphoric and/or deictic references and semantic relationships)
  • Analysis of the speaker's use and/or understanding of pragmatic skills (this will include your ability to accurately complete a number of set tasks, such as analysing the speaker's use of non-verbal cues and different speech acts)
  • Interpretation of results from each analysis
  • Reflection on the experience of completing the different components of the assessment task, including a discussion regarding any challenges you faced, the learning that occurred, and the potential impact that your learning may have on you in the future as a student clinician
  • The standard of writing (including spelling, syntax, punctuation and overall readability), organisation and presentation
  • The accurate use of APA referencing

Within each section of this assessment task, you will be awarded marks based upon the accuracy and completeness of your answers, your ability to use referencing appropriately, and your demonstrated understanding of the assessed concepts. The weighting for each section (i.e. the number of marks allocated to each part of the assessment task) will be specified in the marking rubric.


Referencing Style

Submission
Online

Learning Outcomes Assessed
  • Describe and analyse the core linguistic components of morphology, syntax, phonology, semantics, and pragmatics within a speech pathology context
  • Identify and analyse simple and complex English words and sentences using basic syntactic and morphological analysis skills


Graduate Attributes
  • Communication
  • Problem Solving
  • Critical Thinking
  • Information Literacy
  • Cross Cultural Competence
  • Ethical practice

3 Written Assessment

Assessment Title
Exploring Languages

Task Description

This assessment task will require you to explore and analyse data that is available regarding languages spoken in different locations within Queensland. You will need to document your research findings, critically analyse the quality of the data you have found, and identify any gaps or contradictions in this data. You will be asked to explain why health professionals, including speech pathologists, need to be aware of language differences and local 'language ecologies', and to describe the kinds of considerations and adjustments that may/can/should/should not be made by health professionals in order to work more effectively with communities and clients who speak a different language/variety.


Assessment Due Date

Week 12 Friday (11 Oct 2019) 9:00 pm AEST

Assessment tasks must be submitted via Moodle.


Return Date to Students

Exam Week Friday (25 Oct 2019)

Marks and feedback will be made available via Moodle.


Weighting
35%

Minimum mark or grade
A minimum mark of 50% must be achieved in order to pass this assessment task. This assessment task must be passed in order to pass the SPCH12006 unit.

Assessment Criteria

Specific instructions for this assessment task will be posted on Moodle, including a comprehensive marking rubric. You will be assessed on your ability to:

  • conduct thorough, appropriate research and locate available data on specific languages/varieties spoken in areas within Queensland (these areas will be allocated to you during the term)
  • document and critically analyse your research findings, including the quality of the data and any gaps and/or contradictions you have identified
  • explore and demonstrate an understanding of why health professionals, including speech pathologists, need to be aware of language differences and local 'language ecologies'
  • describe and demonstrate an understanding of the kinds of considerations and adjustments that may/can/should/should not be made by health professionals in order to work more effectively with communities and clients who speak a different language/variety
  • reflect on your learning experiences that occurred as a result of completing this assignment
  • present your assignment in a professional manner - this will include the standard of writing (including spelling, syntax, punctuation and overall readability), organisation and overall presentation
  • accurately use APA referencing

Within each section of this assessment task, you will be awarded marks based upon the accuracy and completeness of your answers, your ability to conduct research into the relevant areas, your use of APA referencing, and your overall demonstrated understanding of the assessed areas. The weighting for each section (i.e. the number of marks allocated to each part of the assessment task) will be specified in the marking rubric.


Referencing Style

Submission
Online

Learning Outcomes Assessed
  • Analyse communication skills with regard to language content, comprehension, processing and use
  • Apply an introductory level of linguistic knowledge to describe communication across culturally and linguistically diverse settings.


Graduate Attributes
  • Communication
  • Problem Solving
  • Critical Thinking
  • Information Literacy
  • Information Technology Competence
  • Cross Cultural Competence
  • Ethical practice
  • Social Innovation

Academic Integrity Statement

As a CQUniversity student you are expected to act honestly in all aspects of your academic work.

Any assessable work undertaken or submitted for review or assessment must be your own work. Assessable work is any type of work you do to meet the assessment requirements in the unit, including draft work submitted for review and feedback and final work to be assessed.

When you use the ideas, words or data of others in your assessment, you must thoroughly and clearly acknowledge the source of this information by using the correct referencing style for your unit. Using others’ work without proper acknowledgement may be considered a form of intellectual dishonesty.

Participating honestly, respectfully, responsibly, and fairly in your university study ensures the CQUniversity qualification you earn will be valued as a true indication of your individual academic achievement and will continue to receive the respect and recognition it deserves.

As a student, you are responsible for reading and following CQUniversity’s policies, including the Student Academic Integrity Policy and Procedure. This policy sets out CQUniversity’s expectations of you to act with integrity, examples of academic integrity breaches to avoid, the processes used to address alleged breaches of academic integrity, and potential penalties.

What is a breach of academic integrity?

A breach of academic integrity includes but is not limited to plagiarism, self-plagiarism, collusion, cheating, contract cheating, and academic misconduct. The Student Academic Integrity Policy and Procedure defines what these terms mean and gives examples.

Why is academic integrity important?

A breach of academic integrity may result in one or more penalties, including suspension or even expulsion from the University. It can also have negative implications for student visas and future enrolment at CQUniversity or elsewhere. Students who engage in contract cheating also risk being blackmailed by contract cheating services.

Where can I get assistance?

For academic advice and guidance, the Academic Learning Centre (ALC) can support you in becoming confident in completing assessments with integrity and of high standard.

What can you do to act with integrity?