CQUniversity Unit Profile
TOUR20022 Term 2 - 2020
Destination Planning and Management
All details in this unit profile for TOUR20022 have been officially approved by CQUniversity and represent a learning partnership between the University and you (our student).
The information will not be changed unless absolutely necessary and any change will be clearly indicated by an approved correction included in the profile.
General Information

Overview

In an increasingly competitive global tourism market, planners, destination management organisations and industry stakeholders are being challenged to provide services for tourists whilst maintaining a unique brand, character and competitive advantage for the destination. This unit is designed as a capstone to the preceding units in the Master of Sustainable Tourism Management course. It draws in the knowledge gained from the core introductory, environmental, economic, marketing and socio-cultural units to critically consider how to sustainably manage destinations through developing in students an advanced understanding of destination governance, branding, sustainable planning and management.

Details

Career Level: Postgraduate
Unit Level: Level 9
Credit Points: 6
Student Contribution Band: 10
Fraction of Full-Time Student Load: 0.125

Pre-requisites or Co-requisites

There are no requisites for this unit.

Important note: Students enrolled in a subsequent unit who failed their pre-requisite unit, should drop the subsequent unit before the census date or within 10 working days of Fail grade notification. Students who do not drop the unit in this timeframe cannot later drop the unit without academic and financial liability. See details in the Assessment Policy and Procedure (Higher Education Coursework).

Offerings For Term 2 - 2020

Cairns
Online

Attendance Requirements

All on-campus students are expected to attend scheduled classes – in some units, these classes are identified as a mandatory (pass/fail) component and attendance is compulsory. International students, on a student visa, must maintain a full time study load and meet both attendance and academic progress requirements in each study period (satisfactory attendance for International students is defined as maintaining at least an 80% attendance record).

Class and Assessment Overview

Recommended Student Time Commitment

Each 6-credit Postgraduate unit at CQUniversity requires an overall time commitment of an average of 12.5 hours of study per week, making a total of 150 hours for the unit.

Class Timetable

Bundaberg, Cairns, Emerald, Gladstone, Mackay, Rockhampton, Townsville
Adelaide, Brisbane, Melbourne, Perth, Sydney

Assessment Overview

1. Written Assessment
Weighting: 40%
2. Practical and Written Assessment
Weighting: 30%
3. Presentation and Written Assessment
Weighting: 30%

Assessment Grading

This is a graded unit: your overall grade will be calculated from the marks or grades for each assessment task, based on the relative weightings shown in the table above. You must obtain an overall mark for the unit of at least 50%, or an overall grade of ‘pass’ in order to pass the unit. If any ‘pass/fail’ tasks are shown in the table above they must also be completed successfully (‘pass’ grade). You must also meet any minimum mark requirements specified for a particular assessment task, as detailed in the ‘assessment task’ section (note that in some instances, the minimum mark for a task may be greater than 50%). Consult the University’s Grades and Results Policy for more details of interim results and final grades.

Previous Student Feedback

Feedback, Recommendations and Responses

Every unit is reviewed for enhancement each year. At the most recent review, the following staff and student feedback items were identified and recommendations were made.

Feedback from Discussion with students

Feedback

Students enjoyed the course

Recommendation

Students like being sent links to contemporary information from newspapers and journals. Weekly links will be sent when the unit is run in 2020.

Unit Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this unit, you will be able to:
  1. describe and critique a range of strategic concepts and theories and their application to sustainable destination planning and management;
  2. critically evaluate the role of destination management and marketing organisations and other stakeholders in the sustainable development of tourism destinations;
  3. analyse and navigate the process of developing destination management plans that effectively interact with and inform the legislative framework; and
  4. using practical examples, identify and evaluate the key features required for the development of a sustainable tourism destination.
Alignment of Learning Outcomes, Assessment and Graduate Attributes
N/A Level
Introductory Level
Intermediate Level
Graduate Level
Professional Level
Advanced Level

Alignment of Assessment Tasks to Learning Outcomes

Assessment Tasks Learning Outcomes
1 2 3 4
1 - Written Assessment - 40%
2 - Practical and Written Assessment - 30%
3 - Presentation and Written Assessment - 30%

Alignment of Graduate Attributes to Learning Outcomes

Graduate Attributes Learning Outcomes
1 2 3 4
1 - Knowledge
2 - Communication
3 - Cognitive, technical and creative skills
4 - Research
5 - Self-management
6 - Ethical and Professional Responsibility
7 - Leadership

Alignment of Assessment Tasks to Graduate Attributes

Assessment Tasks Graduate Attributes
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
1 - Written Assessment - 40%
2 - Practical and Written Assessment - 30%
3 - Presentation and Written Assessment - 30%
Textbooks and Resources

Textbooks

Prescribed

Resort Destinations: Evolution, Management and Development 1 (2009)

Authors: Bruce Prideaux
Butterworth Heinemann
oxford oxford , UK
ISBN: 978-0-7506-5753-2
Binding: Paperback

Additional Textbook Information

If you prefer to study with a paper copy you can purchase at the CQUni Bookshop here: http://bookshop.cqu.edu.au (search on the Unit code). eBooks can be purchased at the publisher's website.

IT Resources

You will need access to the following IT resources:
  • CQUniversity Student Email
  • Internet
  • Unit Website (Moodle)
Referencing Style

All submissions for this unit must use the referencing styles below:

For further information, see the Assessment Tasks.

Teaching Contacts
Bruce Prideaux Unit Coordinator
b.prideaux@cqu.edu.au
Anja Pabel Unit Coordinator
a.pabel@cqu.edu.au
Schedule
Week 1 Begin Date: 13 Jul 2020

Module/Topic

Introduction to destination planning and management

Chapter

Chapter 1

Additional readings posted on Moodle

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 2 Begin Date: 20 Jul 2020

Module/Topic

Sustainable planning concepts across contexts 

Chapter

Chapter 2 

Additional reading posted on Moodle

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 3 Begin Date: 27 Jul 2020

Module/Topic

Governments, governance, policy and regulation

Chapter

Chapters 3

Additional reading posted on Moodle

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 4 Begin Date: 03 Aug 2020

Module/Topic

Tourism planning and the use of scenarios

Chapter

Readings posted on Moodle

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 5 Begin Date: 10 Aug 2020

Module/Topic

Planning in cities

Chapter

Additional reading posted on Moodle

Events and Submissions/Topic

Case study: The scales of tourism planning in a city destination Due: Week 5 Friday (14 Aug 2020) 11:55 pm AEST
Vacation Week Begin Date: 17 Aug 2020

Module/Topic

Vacation

Chapter

Events and Submissions/Topic


Week 6 Begin Date: 24 Aug 2020

Module/Topic

Field trip week 

Chapter

Chapter 6

Additional reading posted on Moodle

Events and Submissions/Topic

A field trip will be held in Cairns city for on-campus student. This field trip is subject to available locations/tourism operators due to COVID-19.

Off-campus students should negotiate a suitable destination with the lecturer.

Week 7 Begin Date: 31 Aug 2020

Module/Topic

Developing the destination product

Chapter

Chapters 4 and 5

Additional reading posted on Moodle

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 8 Begin Date: 07 Sep 2020

Module/Topic

Placemaking, positioning and branding urban places

Chapter

Chapter 7

Additional reading posted on Moodle

Events and Submissions/Topic

Field trip report: Destination development Due: Week 8 Friday (11 Sep 2020) 11:55 pm AEST
Week 9 Begin Date: 14 Sep 2020

Module/Topic

Community planning and engagement

Chapter

Chapter 8 

Additional reading posted on Moodle

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 10 Begin Date: 21 Sep 2020

Module/Topic

Planning in coastal and mountain destinations

Chapter

Chapter 9

Additional reading posted on Moodle

Events and Submissions/Topic

Presentations of Destination Management Plan Brief


Destination Management Plan Brief Due: Week 10 Monday (21 Sep 2020) 11:55 pm AEST
Week 11 Begin Date: 28 Sep 2020

Module/Topic

Planning for resilience and the challenges of climate change 

Chapter

Chapters 5 and 10

Additional reading posted on Moodle


Events and Submissions/Topic

Presentations of Destination Management Plan Brief

Week 12 Begin Date: 05 Oct 2020

Module/Topic

Presentations 

Chapter

Events and Submissions/Topic

Presentations of Destination Management Plan Brief

Assessment Tasks

1 Written Assessment

Assessment Title
Case study: The scales of tourism planning in a city destination

Task Description

Tourism planning is conducted by a range of actors across a range of scales in tourism cities. At the site scale, tourism (and non-tourism) businesses are responsible for planning activities that directly influence the experience of tourists. At one end of the site scale is the tourist experiences of a cafe, while the other end of the scale could be an integrated resort, such as Atlantis the Palm in Dubai. At the destination scale, local governments or other government organisations are usually responsible for the management, planning and marketing of a place, but decision making is often disjointed because of the range of public and private sector organisations that have various planning requirements (eg fire service, local government planning ordinance, electricity providers and communications services). In a similar manner, planning at a regional scale is often disjointed because of conflicting priorities between local governments, the private sector and state and national governments. In Queensland for example, the mining industry would like to expand coal mining operations but at the cost of some damage to the Great Barrier Reef through dredging.

Using the example of a tourist city familiar to you, conduct a critical case study to identify six key issues for tourism development and planning. You are to identify two key issues at the site scale, two at the destination scale and two at the regional scale. Drawing on theories discussed in this unit, justify why these issues are significant and demonstrate how planning can be used to overcome these issues.


This assessment is to be written in essay format and should include subheadings where appropriate. The essay should be no longer than 2,500 words in length (excluding references) and include the following structure:

  • Title page including the title of your assessment, your name, student ID, lecturer/tutor name, and unit name and code
  • Detailed review of the case study, i.e. chosen tourist city and any background information
  • Identification of six key issues for tourism development and planning
  • Demonstrate evidence of research through the integration of relevant literature using theories/concepts from this unit
  • Justification of why the issues are significant and recommendations on how planning can be used to overcome these issues
  • Write a conclusion that sums up the main points
  • Reference list including at least 15 academic references.

Penalties apply for late submission (5% mark will be deducted from the total mark for the assessment per day unless an approved extension has been granted).


Assessment Due Date

Week 5 Friday (14 Aug 2020) 11:55 pm AEST


Return Date to Students

Week 7 Friday (4 Sep 2020) 12:00 am AEST


Weighting
40%

Assessment Criteria

A brief marking criteria is provided below. A more detailed marking rubric is provided on Moodle.

  • Evidence of critical thought about the scales of tourism planning
  • Justification of the selection of significant issues
  • Application of tourism planning theories
  • Use of suitable examples
  • Evidence of research through appropriate academic references (minimum of 15)


Referencing Style

Submission
Online

Submission Instructions
Submit via the Assessment 1 link on Moodle

Learning Outcomes Assessed
  • describe and critique a range of strategic concepts and theories and their application to sustainable destination planning and management;
  • critically evaluate the role of destination management and marketing organisations and other stakeholders in the sustainable development of tourism destinations;
  • using practical examples, identify and evaluate the key features required for the development of a sustainable tourism destination.


Graduate Attributes
  • Knowledge
  • Communication
  • Cognitive, technical and creative skills
  • Research
  • Self-management

2 Practical and Written Assessment

Assessment Title
Field trip report: Destination development

Task Description

Field trip report: Destination development

  • On-campus students: Field trip will be subject to available locations/tourism operators in the light of Covid-19 restrictions. Field trip will be at the students' own expense.
  • Distance students: select an urban destination in your area.

In Assessment 1 you identified a range of planning issues affecting a chosen destination. Drawing on the knowledge you gained from undertaking Assessment 1, the lecture material in this unit, your readings, and your notes and observations from the field trip, write a report that critically examines the current product mix in a destination and make recommendations for further development of the destination. You should consider the implications of your suggestions from a triple bottom line perspective. Identify what key businesses and/or services you think need to be established in your chosen destination and provide suggestions on where these may be located and who should be responsible for their funding. For example you may identify the need for additional CBD parking, pedestrian malls and more signage. Who should fund this, the local government authority or private sector investors?

The field trip report should be no longer than 2,000 words in length and include the following structure:

  • Title page including the title of your assessment, your name, student ID, lecturer/tutor name, and unit name and code
  • Introduction to the tourism setting and any background information
  • Detailed review of the current product mix in the destination
  • Demonstrate evidence of research through the integration of relevant literature using theories/concepts from this unit
  • Make recommendations for further development of the destination
  • Consider the implications of your recommendations from a triple bottom line perspective
  • Write a conclusion that sums up the main points
  • Reference list including at least 15 academic references.

Penalties apply for late submission (5% mark will be deducted from the total mark for the assessment per day unless an approved extension has been granted).


Assessment Due Date

Week 8 Friday (11 Sep 2020) 11:55 pm AEST


Return Date to Students

Week 10 Friday (25 Sep 2020) 12:00 am AEST


Weighting
30%

Assessment Criteria

A brief marking criteria is provided below. A more detailed marking rubric is provided on Moodle.

  • Evidence of critical thought about destination development, i.e. background of destination and review of product mix
  • Effectively substantiate your argument with appropriate evidence, i.e. recommendations and implications of these
  • Use of suitable examples
  • Use of supporting evidence including figures, tables and links to source documents
  • Evidence of research through appropriate academic references (minimum of 15)


Referencing Style

Submission
Online

Submission Instructions
Submit via the Assessment 2 link on Moodle

Learning Outcomes Assessed
  • using practical examples, identify and evaluate the key features required for the development of a sustainable tourism destination.


Graduate Attributes
  • Knowledge
  • Communication
  • Cognitive, technical and creative skills
  • Research
  • Self-management

3 Presentation and Written Assessment

Assessment Title
Destination Management Plan Brief

Task Description

Individual Presentation: Destination Management Plan Brief

Imagine you are a planner employed by a Destination Management Organisation (DMO) such as a local council. You are seeking tenders for a five-year Destination Management Plan (DMP) and have called a meeting of interested consultants to invite them to tender for the DMP.


You are free to select a destination of your choice. This will require a short overview of the destination when you are presenting the brief. You have 15 minutes to give an overview of your chosen destination, the type of development projects that you anticipate may occur within the next five years (new hotels for example), problems that you expect the consultants to consider (for example climate change, change in demand and access issues), some examples of other DMPs you think are worth looking at, and what you expect the DMP to contain as a final document.


You will need to prepare a two-page brief as a handout to be given out at the time of your presentation. The brief should contain all relevant information and references.


You are to present the brief using Powerpoint. The PPT slides for this assessment are due in Week 10. On-campus students will present in Weeks 10, 11 and 12. 


Distance students will present via Zoom with the lecturer and other distance students starting in Week 10. Distance students should discuss their preferred destination for this assessment with the lecturer by Week 6.


Penalties apply for late submission (5% mark will be deducted from the total mark for the assessment per day unless an approved extension has been granted).


Assessment Due Date

Week 10 Monday (21 Sep 2020) 11:55 pm AEST


Return Date to Students

Graded assessments will be available on Certification of Grades


Weighting
30%

Assessment Criteria

A brief marking criteria is provided below. A more detailed marking rubric is provided on Moodle.

  • An understanding of the key elements of a Destination Management Plan
  • Innovative and/or insightful presentation, i.e. demonstrates knowledge of destination, current and future issues/problems, future development projects
  • Use of suitable examples
  • Use of appropriate supporting data including tables and figures
  • Quality of written work, i.e. handout
  • Evidence of research through appropriate academic references (minimum of 10)


Referencing Style

Submission
Online

Submission Instructions
Submit both tasks (PPT slides and two-page brief document) via the Assessment 3 link on Moodle

Learning Outcomes Assessed
  • analyse and navigate the process of developing destination management plans that effectively interact with and inform the legislative framework; and
  • using practical examples, identify and evaluate the key features required for the development of a sustainable tourism destination.


Graduate Attributes
  • Knowledge
  • Communication
  • Cognitive, technical and creative skills
  • Research
  • Self-management
  • Ethical and Professional Responsibility
  • Leadership

Academic Integrity Statement

As a CQUniversity student you are expected to act honestly in all aspects of your academic work.

Any assessable work undertaken or submitted for review or assessment must be your own work. Assessable work is any type of work you do to meet the assessment requirements in the unit, including draft work submitted for review and feedback and final work to be assessed.

When you use the ideas, words or data of others in your assessment, you must thoroughly and clearly acknowledge the source of this information by using the correct referencing style for your unit. Using others’ work without proper acknowledgement may be considered a form of intellectual dishonesty.

Participating honestly, respectfully, responsibly, and fairly in your university study ensures the CQUniversity qualification you earn will be valued as a true indication of your individual academic achievement and will continue to receive the respect and recognition it deserves.

As a student, you are responsible for reading and following CQUniversity’s policies, including the Student Academic Integrity Policy and Procedure. This policy sets out CQUniversity’s expectations of you to act with integrity, examples of academic integrity breaches to avoid, the processes used to address alleged breaches of academic integrity, and potential penalties.

What is a breach of academic integrity?

A breach of academic integrity includes but is not limited to plagiarism, self-plagiarism, collusion, cheating, contract cheating, and academic misconduct. The Student Academic Integrity Policy and Procedure defines what these terms mean and gives examples.

Why is academic integrity important?

A breach of academic integrity may result in one or more penalties, including suspension or even expulsion from the University. It can also have negative implications for student visas and future enrolment at CQUniversity or elsewhere. Students who engage in contract cheating also risk being blackmailed by contract cheating services.

What can you do to act with integrity?

Where can I get assistance?

For academic advice and guidance, the Academic Learning Centre (ALC) can support you in becoming confident in completing assessments with integrity and of high standard.