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CC59 - Bachelor of Public Health (Specialisation)

Overview

Compulsory Residential School

Some units in this course require you to attend a compulsory Residential School or Work Integrated Learning. Please see Course Features in the Getting Started tab for further information.

Course Overview

Public health refers to a collection of disciplines that share a common aim - to prevent disease, promote health and improve wellbeing among the population as a whole rather than focusing on individuals. Some of the most important advances in health internationally over the last century have been public health interventions - including the eradication of smallpox, improvements in workplace safety, reduced morbidity from cholera and decreased trends in tobacco smoking. Students of the Bachelor of Public Health will develop an understanding of evidence-based strategies to address existing, evolving and re-emerging health risks and achieve higher standards of health and wellbeing. A strong emphasis on participation, prevention and partnership with the community is threaded throughout the curriculum. Each of these concepts is explored and developed within the core public health units, resulting in graduates who internalise and integrate the notions of theory, research and practice as the basis of their work. You will also be able to confidently articulate your own vision of a socio-ecological model of public health, develop and maintain community and industry partnerships in promoting public health and participate in the political process to advocate for health, social justice and equity through contributions to public policy and decision-making. You will choose to major in health promotion, environmental health or nutrition.

Students majoring in health promotion will learn to initiate, manage and evaluate a health promotion project by applying relevant theoretical knowledge and strategies. Graduates will have the capacity to practise as an entry-level health promotion practitioner in accordance with Australian and international health promotion competencies.

Students majoring in environmental health will learn to assess, monitor and evaluate environmental health issues and facilitate conflict resolution between agencies, regulated parties and the community through the application of law, provision of information and problem solving. Graduates will be recognised to practise as an entry-level environmental health practitioner in accordance with the enHealth Skills and Knowledge Matrix.

Students majoring in public health nutrition will learn to develop, implement, coordinate and evaluate a range of food and nutrition interventions through working with local, state, national and international government, non-government and community-based organisations. Graduates will have the capacity to practise as entry-level public health nutritionists.

All students will gain crucial lifelong learning and transferable generic skills, such as critical thinking, teamwork and problem solving, applicable to a range of employment opportunities and life situations. The Bachelor of Public Health will also enable you to gain entry into a variety of postgraduate and vocationally oriented courses offered by CQUniversity or other institutions. You can tailor your own course to enhance your employability or satisfy a personal interest by taking a minor unit of study in health promotion (for environmental health majors), environmental health (for health promotion majors), occupational health and safety, nutrition (for health promotion majors), environmental science, built environment, exercise science or management and human resources. Alternatively, you can elect to take up to four units selected from any the University has to offer, provided any pre-requisites are met.

Career Information

A number of changes within health promotion and environmental health positions have occurred recently meaning that, future graduates will need to diversify into new roles rather than relying on traditional appointments.

Graduates of the Bachelor of Public Health (Environmental Health) will be qualified to work as Environmental Health Officers in Local, State and Federal Government, in public health roles in the armed forces, international aid organisations, other non-profit organisations and in the food industry. Graduates who have selected an appropriate minor may also find employment in government environmental protection appointments as well as environmental management or occupational health and safety roles in private industry.

Graduates of the Bachelor of Public Health (Health Promotion) will be qualified to work as Health Promotion Officers in Local, State and Federal Government, and may also find employment in a range of non-government organisations, such as the Cancer Council and Heart Foundation or other areas relevant to their chosen minor.

Course Details
Duration 3 years full-time or 6 years part-time
Credit Points that Must be Earned 144
Number of Units Required CQUniversity uses the concept of credits to express the amount of study required for a particular course and individual units. The number of units varies between courses. Units in undergraduate courses normally consist of 6 points of credit or multiples thereof (e.g. 12, 18, 24).
Expected Hours of Study One point of credit is equivalent to an expectation of approximately two hours of student work per week in a term.
Course Type Undergraduate Award
Qualification (post nominal) BPubHlth
AQF Level Level 7: Bachelor Degree

Admission Codes

Domestic Students
Tertiary Admission Centre Codes (TAC) Codes
International Students
CRICOS Codes
Not Applicable
Where and when can I start?
Units offered internally at the below campuses may be delivered using a combination of face-to-face and video conferencing style teaching.
Units offered via MIX mode are delivered online and require compulsory attendance of site-specific learning activities such as on-campus residential schools, placements and/or work integrated learning. See Course Features tab for further information. Online units are delivered using online resources only.
Please Click Here for more information.
The following tables list the courses availabilities by location and term. Directing your pointer over your preferred location will provide further information if this course is not available for the full duration. Please be sure to also check individual unit availability by location and term prior to enrolling.

Domestic Availability

Term 2 - 2020

Bundaberg
Cairns
Online
Rockhampton
Townsville

Term 1 - 2020

Bundaberg
Cairns
Online
Rockhampton
Townsville

Term 2 - 2019

Bundaberg
Cairns
Online
Rockhampton
Townsville

Term 1 - 2019

Bundaberg
Cairns
Online
Rockhampton
Townsville

Term 2 - 2018

Bundaberg
Cairns
Distance
Rockhampton
Townsville

Term 1 - 2018

Bundaberg
Cairns
Distance
Rockhampton
Townsville

Term 2 - 2017

Bundaberg
Cairns
Distance
Rockhampton
Townsville

Term 1 - 2017

Bundaberg
Cairns
Distance
Rockhampton
Townsville

Term 2 - 2016

Bundaberg
Cairns
Distance
Rockhampton

Term 1 - 2016

Bundaberg
Cairns
Distance
Rockhampton

Term 2 - 2015

Distance

Term 1 - 2015

Distance
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International Availability

Term 2 - 2020

Sorry, no international availabilities found.

Term 1 - 2020

Sorry, no international availabilities found.

Term 2 - 2019

Sorry, no international availabilities found.

Term 1 - 2019

Sorry, no international availabilities found.

Term 2 - 2018

Sorry, no international availabilities found.

Term 1 - 2018

Sorry, no international availabilities found.

Term 2 - 2017

Sorry, no international availabilities found.

Term 1 - 2017

Sorry, no international availabilities found.

Term 2 - 2016

Sorry, no international availabilities found.

Term 1 - 2016

Sorry, no international availabilities found.

Term 2 - 2015

Sorry, no international availabilities found.

Term 1 - 2015

Sorry, no international availabilities found.
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For any problems regarding admissions availability for the selected course please contact 13 CQUni (13 27 86) or send us an email at http://contactus.cqu.edu.au/
What do I need to start?
Entry Scores
Rank Threshold OP 17 | SR 65 | ATAR 59.9
Rank Cut-Off OP 17 | SR 65 | ATAR 59.9
Entry Requirements

English Requirements:

If you were not born in Australia, Canada, New Zealand, United Kingdom, Ireland, South Africa or United States of America, you are required to meet the English Language Proficiency requirements set by the University.

Applicants are required to provide evidence of completion of:

  • a secondary qualification (Year 11 and 12, or equivalent), or
  • tertiary diploma level qualification, or
  • bachelor level qualification study for a period of at least 2 years fulltime with a minimum overall GPA 4.0

completed within Australia, Canada, New Zealand, United Kingdom, South Africa, Ireland, or United States of America, which will meet the English proficiency.

If you do not satisfy any of the above, you will need to undertake an English language proficiency test and achieve the following scores:

  • An International English Language Testing System (IELTS Academic) overall band score of at least 6.0 overall with a minimum 5.5 in each subset; or
  • Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) - Requires 550 or better overall and minimum TWE score of 4.5 (Paper Based Test), or 75 or better overall and no score less than 17 (Internet Based Test); or
  • Pearson Test of English Academic (PTE Academic) - Requires an overall score of 54 with no sub-score less than 46; or
  • An Occupational English Test with Grades A or B only in each of the four components; or
  • Cambridge Certificate in advanced English (CAE) - Score of 180 or above; or
  • Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English - Score of 200 or above; or
  • Combined Universities Language Test (CULT) - 70% with no individual component score of less than 15.

English test results remain valid for no more than two years between final examination date and the date of commencement of study, and must appear on a single result certificate.

Security Requirements
No information available at this time
Health Requirements
No information available at this time
Assumed Knowledge

Senior English and a Science subject OR Associate Degree in Public Health OR relevant VET Certificate or Diploma.

Fees and Charges
Course Features

Awards and Accreditation

Interim Awards Not applicable
Exit Awards CC44 - Associate Degree in Public Health (specialisation)
Professional Accreditation


Learned Society Accreditation Not applicable

Residential School Requirements

Compulsory Residential School Students are required to attend residential school for a number of units in the course: Compulsory for all students: SCIE11022 Introductory Science; PBHL12001 Communicable Diseases and Public Health, Environmental Health Majors: ENVR11012 Applications of Env Sc MBIO19012 Microbiology; ENVH12001 Food Safety; ENVH13002 Env Health Risk Management
Click here to view all Residential Schools

Practicum/Work Placement

PBHL13004 - Placement in professional environment relevant to chosen major. Developing experience relevant to professional- specific activities/tasks. Planning and conducting a research project or health promotion program in the workplace.
PBHL13003 - Placement in professional environment relevant to chosen major. Developing experience relevant to professional- specific activities/tasks. Planning and conducting a research project or health promotion program in the workplace.

Previous Enrolments

Year Number of Students
2019 73
2018 74
2017 67
2016 72
2015 67
Inherent Requirements
There are Inherent Requirements (IRs) that you need to be aware of, and fulfil, to achieve the core learning outcomes of the units and course. IRs are the essential capabilities, knowledge, behaviours and skills that are needed to complete a unit or course.

Please note that in some instances there may be similarities between course, entry and inherent requirements.

If you experience difficulties meeting these requirements, reasonable adjustments may be made upon contacting accessibility@cqu.edu.au. Adjustment must not compromise the academic integrity of the degree or course chosen at CQUniversity or the legal requirements of field education.

Ethical Behaviour

Examples are:

  • Complying with academic and non-academic misconduct policies and procedures such as CQUniversity’s Student Charter, Student Misconduct Policy and Student Behavioural Misconduct Procedures and Assessment Policy and Procedure (Higher Education Coursework).
  • Demonstrating the applicable codes of ethics as they apply in the practice of public health.
  • Demonstrating an ability to reflect on ethical dilemmas and issues and taking responsibility for ensuring awareness of ethical behaviour.
  • Demonstrating respect for cultural diversity as well as individual differences and capacities in public health practice.
  • Treating personal information obtained in professional settings as private and confidential.
  • Maintaining ethical behaviour in a professional setting, through successfully distinguishing your own personal values and beliefs from those of others.
Behavioural Stability

Examples are:

  • Being reflective with personal behaviours appropriate for professional performance and being positive and receptive to processing constructive supervisor/lecturer feedback or criticism.
  • Interacting with people from a wide range of backgrounds and cultures in a calm and composed manner that shows respect for difference, including when dealing with difficult situations.
  • Successfully processing your own emotions and behaviour when dealing with stressful situations that can arise in public health practice.
Legal Compliance

Examples are:

  • Complying with university and workplace policy with the use of social media, online discussion forums, email and other electronic forms of communication.
  • Complying with the policies and practices of organisations in which you may be placed or find employment, including those relating to OHS.
Communication Skills (Verbal, Non-verbal, Written and Technology)

Examples are:

  • Verbally communicating your public health knowledge and skills with accuracy, appropriateness and effectiveness in a wide variety of contexts.
  • Actively participating in discussion and course activities with appropriate use and command of language within the context.
  • Using appropriate facial expressions: eye contact, being mindful of space boundaries, and a range of body movements and gestures.
  • Recognising and interpreting non-verbal cues of others and responding appropriately during activities related to the course and in professional practice.
  • Competently and appropriately producing written assessment work in a logical, coherent manner, and with correct grammar and punctuation to the required academic standards.
  • Constructing fluent summarised written text from complex and detailed information.
  • Constructing coherent reports in a timely manner to meet professional standards and clearly communicating the intended message.
  • Competently using a desktop operating system such as Microsoft Windows or Mac OS X skills to engage in on -line learning, reading and responding as required to emails, and completing relevant assessments for the course.
  • Competently using productivity software such as Microsoft Office in your course of study.
  • Regularly accessing the Internet for research, and email for communication with peers and lecturers.
Cognitive Abilities (Knowledge and Cognitive Skills, Literacy and Numeracy)

Examples are:

  • Conceptualising and using appropriate knowledge in response to academic assessment items.
  • Completing academic learning activities and assessment tasks, and performing professional skills within reasonable set time-frames.
  • Constructing written text proficiently, in English, using appropriate vocabulary and conventions of speech, including being able to paraphrase, summarise and reference in accordance with appropriate academic conventions.
  • Competently reading, writing and accurately interpreting information to convey language effectively in a professional setting.
  • Completing documentation that is accurate, clear and concise.
  • Demonstrating competency in applying mathematics knowledge and numeracy skills to accurately read and interpret various measurements.
  • Demonstrating effective application of mathematics knowledge and numeracy skills in public health practice.
Relational Skills
  • Initiating and maintaining effective partnerships with a range of interdisciplinary and inter-agency stakeholders.
  • Initiating and maintaining effective relationships with key community networks.
Reflective Skills
  • Undertaking regular self-assessment of emotional intelligence, recognising own responses and effects of own behaviour on others.
  • Critiquing own philosophical, attitudinal and cognitive foundations to practice and a willingness to changing these as necessary.
Interpersonal Engagement

Examples are:

  • Demonstrating the skills of collaborating with fellow students and colleagues, modifying and reflecting on practice, or modifying and reflecting on work in response to supervisor feedback.
  • Building rapport with colleagues and stakeholders in order to engage them in effective public health practice.
  • Critically self-reflecting on situations that may/may not have gone well, and taking the learning point(s) from those situations.
  • Interacting and engaging with individuals and groups in public health practice in a respectful and culturally competent manner in a wide variety of contexts.
Core Learning Outcomes
Please refer to the Core Structure Learning Outcomes
Environmental Health Learning Outcomes
  • 1. Integrate socio-ecological systems thinking into professional public health practice
  • 2. Initiate and maintain professional public health partnerships in industry and communities
  • 3. Integrate theory and research into everyday public health practice
  • 4. Engage in the political process to advocate for health, social justice and equity
  • 5. Assess, monitor, and evaluate environmental health issues in a professional and ethical manner
  • 6. Facilitate conflict resolution between agencies, regulated parties and the community
  • 7. Demonstrate an ability to practise as an entry level environmental health professional in accordance with the enHealth Skills and Knowledge Matrix.
  Course Learning Outcomes
Australian Qualifications Framework Descriptors 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
1. KNOWLEDGE Have a broad and coherent body of knowledge, with depth in the underlying principles and concepts in one or more disciplines as a basis for independent lifelong learning
2. SKILLS Have cognitive skills to review critically, analyse, consolidate and synthesise knowledge
3. SKILLS Have cognitive and technical skills to demonstrate a broad understanding of knowledge with depth in some areas
4. SKILLS Have cognitive and creative skills to exercise critical thinking and judgement in identifying and solving problems with intellectual independence
5. SKILLS Have communication skills to present a clear, coherent and independent exposition of knowledge and ideas
6. APPLICATION OF KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS Demonstrate initiative and judgement in planning, problem solving and decision making in professional practice and/or scholarship
7. APPLICATION OF KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS Adapt knowledge and skills in diverse contexts
8. APPLICATION OF KNOWLEDGE & SKILL Be responsible and accountable for own learning and professional practice and in collaboration with others within broad parameters
Health Promotion Learning Outcomes
  • 1. Integrate socio-ecological systems thinking into professional public health practice
  • 2. Initiate and maintain professional public health partnerships in industry and communities
  • 3. Integrate theory and research into everyday public health practice
  • 4. Engage in the political process to advocate for health, social justice and equity
  • 5. Initiate, manage and evaluate a health promotion project in an ethical manner as an entry level health promotion practitioner
  • 6. Evaluate and apply relevant health promotion theoretical knowledge to health promotion projects and situations
  • 7. Practise in accordance with Australian and International health promotion competencies.
  Course Learning Outcomes
Australian Qualifications Framework Descriptors 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
1. KNOWLEDGE Have a broad and coherent body of knowledge, with depth in the underlying principles and concepts in one or more disciplines as a basis for independent lifelong learning
2. SKILLS Have cognitive skills to review critically, analyse, consolidate and synthesise knowledge
3. SKILLS Have cognitive and technical skills to demonstrate a broad understanding of knowledge with depth in some areas
4. SKILLS Have cognitive and creative skills to exercise critical thinking and judgement in identifying and solving problems with intellectual independence
5. SKILLS Have communication skills to present a clear, coherent and independent exposition of knowledge and ideas
6. APPLICATION OF KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS Demonstrate initiative and judgement in planning, problem solving and decision making in professional practice and/or scholarship
7. APPLICATION OF KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS Adapt knowledge and skills in diverse contexts
8. APPLICATION OF KNOWLEDGE & SKILL Be responsible and accountable for own learning and professional practice and in collaboration with others within broad parameters
Nutrition Learning Outcomes
  • 1. Integrate socio-ecological systems thinking into professional public health practice
  • 2. Initiate and maintain professional public health partnerships in industry and communities
  • 3. Integrate theory and research into everyday public health practice
  • 4. Advocate for health equity, social justice and equity
  • 5. Initiate, manage and evaluate a public health project in an ethical manner as an entry level public health nutritionist
  • 6. Evaluate and apply relevant public health nutrition theoretical knowledge to public health projects and situations
  • 7. Practice in accordance with Australian and International nutritionist competencies.
  Course Learning Outcomes
Australian Qualifications Framework Descriptors 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
1. KNOWLEDGE Have a broad and coherent body of knowledge, with depth in the underlying principles and concepts in one or more disciplines as a basis for independent lifelong learning
2. SKILLS Have cognitive skills to review critically, analyse, consolidate and synthesise knowledge
3. SKILLS Have cognitive and technical skills to demonstrate a broad understanding of knowledge with depth in some areas
4. SKILLS Have cognitive and creative skills to exercise critical thinking and judgement in identifying and solving problems with intellectual independence
5. SKILLS Have communication skills to present a clear, coherent and independent exposition of knowledge and ideas
6. APPLICATION OF KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS Demonstrate initiative and judgement in planning, problem solving and decision making in professional practice and/or scholarship
7. APPLICATION OF KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS Adapt knowledge and skills in diverse contexts
8. APPLICATION OF KNOWLEDGE & SKILL Be responsible and accountable for own learning and professional practice and in collaboration with others within broad parameters
Built Environment Learning Outcomes
Please refer to the Core Structure Learning Outcomes
Environmental Health Learning Outcomes
Please refer to the Core Structure Learning Outcomes
Environmental Science Learning Outcomes
Please refer to the Core Structure Learning Outcomes
Exercise Science Learning Outcomes
Please refer to the Core Structure Learning Outcomes
Health Promotion Learning Outcomes
Please refer to the Core Structure Learning Outcomes
Indigenous Studies Learning Outcomes
Please refer to the Core Structure Learning Outcomes
Management and Human Resources Learning Outcomes
Please refer to the Core Structure Learning Outcomes
Nutrition Science Learning Outcomes
Please refer to the Core Structure Learning Outcomes
Occupational Health and Safety Learning Outcomes
Please refer to the Core Structure Learning Outcomes
Learning Outcomes
Please refer to the Core Structure Learning Outcomes
Course Structure

In order to complete this course, you must:

  1. Complete the core structure
  2. Complete 1 major
  3. Complete electives
Number of units: 12 Total credit points: 72


Year 1 - Term 1
Students must complete the following compulsory units:
HLTH11027 Foundations of Health
ENVH11001 Health and the Environment
SCIE11022 Introductory Science
Year 1 - Term 2
Students must complete the following compulsory units:
PBHL11002 Public Health and Chronic Disease
PBHL11001 Public Health Data and Measurement
Year 2 - Term 1
Students must complete the following compulsory units:
PBHL12001 Communicable Diseases and Public Health
Year 2 - Term 2
Students must complete the following compulsory units:
PBHL12002 Public Health Interventions
Year 3 - Term 1
Students must complete the following compulsory units:
HLTH13031 Population Health Epidemiology
PBHL13001 Public Health and Environmental Sustainability
PBHL13003 Public Health in Practice A
Year 3 - Term 2
Students must complete the following compulsory units:
PBHL13002 Public Health Disaster Management
PBHL13004 Public Health in Practice B
Course Structure

In order to complete this course, you must:

  1. Complete the core structure
  2. Complete 1 major
  3. Complete electives

Environmental Health Major

Number of units: 8 Total credit points: 48

The environmental health profession in New South Wales often includes significant duties relating to building surveying. Students considering working in this jurisdiction should consider the Built Environment minor when planning their study.

Year 1 - Term 1
Students must complete the following compulsory units:
ENVR11011 Modern Environmental Issues
Year 1 - Term 2
Students must complete the following compulsory units:
ENVR11012 Applications of Environmental Science
AINV11003 Introduction to Investigative Methods
Year 2 - Term 1
Students must complete the following compulsory units:
ENVH12002 Environmental Health Law
MBIO19012 Microbiology
Year 2 - Term 2
Students must complete the following compulsory units:
ENVH12001 Food Safety
ENVH12003 Environmental Toxicology
Year 3 - Term 2
Students must complete the following compulsory units:
ENVH13002 Environmental Health Risk Management
Course Structure

In order to complete this course, you must:

  1. Complete the core structure
  2. Complete 1 major
  3. Complete electives

Health Promotion Major

Number of units: 8 Total credit points: 48


Year 1 - Term 1
Students must complete the following compulsory units:
HLTH11031 Healthy Lifestyles
Year 1 - Term 2
Students must complete the following compulsory units:
HLTH11029 Health Promotion Concepts
INDG11006 Foundations of Indigenous Learning
Year 2 - Term 1
Students must complete the following compulsory units:
HLTH12032 Community Assets and Needs Assessment
HLTH12030 Drugs in Society
Year 2 - Term 2
Students must complete the following compulsory units:
HLTH12031 Community Engaged Learning
GEOG19021 Geographic Information Systems
Year 3 - Term 3
Students must complete the following compulsory units:
HLTH13035 Health in all Policies
Course Structure

In order to complete this course, you must:

  1. Complete the core structure
  2. Complete 1 major
  3. Complete electives
Number of units: 8 Total credit points: 48

Students majoring in nutrition are strongly recommended to undertake the Health Promotion Minor.

Year 1 - Term 1
Students must complete the following compulsory units:
BMSC11001 Human Body Systems 1
Year 1 - Term 2
Students must complete the following compulsory units:
BMSC11002 Human Body Systems 2
BMSC11006 Food, Nutrition and Health
Year 2 - Term 1
Students must complete the following compulsory units:
HLTH12032 Community Assets and Needs Assessment
NUTR12001 Human Nutrition
Year 2 - Term 2
Students must complete the following compulsory units:
NUTR12002 Nutrition in Practice
ENVH12001 Food Safety
Year 3 - Term 1
Students must complete the following compulsory units:
NUTR13001 Public Health Nutrition
Course Structure

In order to complete this course, you must:

  1. Complete the core structure
  2. Complete 1 major
  3. Complete electives

Built Environment Minor

Course Structure

In order to complete this course, you must:

  1. Complete the core structure
  2. Complete 1 major
  3. Complete electives

Environmental Health Minor

Number of units: 4 Total credit points: 24

Students will be required to attend compulsory residential schools for ENVH12001 Food Safety and ENVH13002 Environmental Health Risk Management.

Students majoring in Environmental Health are not eligible to complete this minor.

Available units
Students must complete the following compulsory units:
ENVH12001 Food Safety
ENVH12002 Environmental Health Law
ENVH12003 Environmental Toxicology
ENVH13002 Environmental Health Risk Management
Course Structure

In order to complete this course, you must:

  1. Complete the core structure
  2. Complete 1 major
  3. Complete electives

Health Promotion Minor

Number of units: 4 Total credit points: 24


Students majoring in Health Promotion are not eligible to complete this minor.

Students majoring in Nutrition are recommended to take this minor. As HLTH12032 Community Assets and Needs Assessment is already a core unit, replace with HLTH11029 Health Promotion Concepts.

Available units
Students must complete the following compulsory units:
HLTH12032 Community Assets and Needs Assessment
HLTH12031 Community Engaged Learning
HLTH13035 Health in all Policies
Available units
Students must complete 1 from the following units:
HLTH11029 Health Promotion Concepts
HLTH11031 Healthy Lifestyles
Course Structure

In order to complete this course, you must:

  1. Complete the core structure
  2. Complete 1 major
  3. Complete electives

Indigenous Studies Minor

Number of units: 4 Total credit points: 24

Health Promotion major students will need to select an alternative elective.

Available units
Students must complete from the following units:
INDG11006 Foundations of Indigenous Learning
INDG11013 Introductory Aboriginal & Islander History
INDG19015 Aboriginal Cultures and Country
INDG19016 Contemporary Indigenous Issues
Course Structure

In order to complete this course, you must:

  1. Complete the core structure
  2. Complete 1 major
  3. Complete electives
Course Structure

In order to complete this course, you must:

  1. Complete the core structure
  2. Complete 1 major
  3. Complete electives

Nutrition Science Minor

Number of units: 4 Total credit points: 24


Environmental Health majors should choose HLTH11031.

Health Promotion Majors should choose ENVH12001.

Students majoring in Nutrition are not able to take this minor. 

Available units
Students must complete the following compulsory units:
NUTR12001 Human Nutrition
NUTR13001 Public Health Nutrition
NUTR12002 Nutrition in Practice
Available units
Students must complete 1 from the following units:
HLTH11031 Healthy Lifestyles
ENVH12001 Food Safety
Course Structure

In order to complete this course, you must:

  1. Complete the core structure
  2. Complete 1 major
  3. Complete electives
Course Structure

In order to complete this course, you must:

  1. Complete the core structure
  2. Complete 1 major
  3. Complete electives
Number of units: 4 Total credit points: 24


Students can select from one Minor or choose any four units offered by the University, provided prerequisites are met.

More Details
There is no additional information for this course.