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The information below is relevant from 24/02/2014 to 08/03/2015
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SOCL11055 - Self and Society

General Information

Unit Synopsis

An individual’s relationship with society is the main theme of the course. This course teaches students that industrial societies emerged from the remnants of pre-capitalist and pre-industrial communities. It also addresses how contemporary societies are organised. This course will enable students to start thinking sociologically - a distinctive way of understanding the social forces that shape the world. Students will come to understand the underlying social, political and economic forces that shape social inequality and individual autonomy. Knowledge and understanding of sociological ways of seeing the world will reinforce the practices of critical thinking - the foundation of sociological inquiry.

Details

Level Undergraduate
Unit Level 1
Credit Points 6
Student Contribution Band SCA Band 4
Fraction of Full-Time Student Load 0.125
Pre-requisites or Co-requisites There are no pre-requisites for the unit.

Important note: Students enrolled in a subsequent unit who failed their pre-requisite unit, should drop the subsequent unit before the census date or within 10 working days of Fail grade notification. Students who do not drop the unit in this timeframe cannot later drop the unit without academic and financial liability. See details in the Assessment Policy and Procedure (Higher Education Coursework).

Class Timetable View Unit Timetable
Residential School No Residential School

Unit Availabilities from Term 1 - 2014

Term 1 - 2017 Profile
Distance
Term 3 - 2017 Profile
Distance
Term 1 - 2018 Profile
Distance
Term 3 - 2018 Profile
Distance
Term 1 - 2019 Profile
Online
Term 3 - 2019 Profile
Online
Term 1 - 2020 Profile
Online
Term 1 - 2021 Profile
Online
Term 1 - 2022 Profile
Online

Attendance Requirements

All on-campus students are expected to attend scheduled classes – in some units, these classes are identified as a mandatory (pass/fail) component and attendance is compulsory. International students, on a student visa, must maintain a full time study load and meet both attendance and academic progress requirements in each study period (satisfactory attendance for International students is defined as maintaining at least an 80% attendance record).

Assessment Overview

Recommended Student Time Commitment

Each 6-credit Undergraduate unit at CQUniversity requires an overall time commitment of an average of 12.5 hours of study per week, making a total of 150 hours for the unit.

Assessment Tasks

Assessment Task Weighting
1. Written Assessment 25%
2. Written Assessment 50%
3. Online Quiz(zes) 25%

This is a graded unit: your overall grade will be calculated from the marks or grades for each assessment task, based on the relative weightings shown in the table above. You must obtain an overall mark for the unit of at least 50%, or an overall grade of ‘pass’ in order to pass the unit. If any ‘pass/fail’ tasks are shown in the table above they must also be completed successfully (‘pass’ grade). You must also meet any minimum mark requirements specified for a particular assessment task, as detailed in the ‘assessment task’ section (note that in some instances, the minimum mark for a task may be greater than 50%).

Consult the University’s Grades and Results Policy for more details of interim results and final grades

Past Exams

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Previous Feedback

Term 1 - 2020 : The overall satisfaction for students in the last offering of this course was 3.9 (on a 5 point Likert scale), based on a 34.78% response rate.

Feedback, Recommendations and Responses

Every unit is reviewed for enhancement each year. At the most recent review, the following staff and student feedback items were identified and recommendations were made.

Source: Moodle
Feedback
There was a lot of confusion over the concept of a 'critical whiteness perspective' in the Unit Learning Outcomes as this is not covered in depth within the unit content but is a requirement in one of the assignments.
Recommendation
That this aspect of the unit be dropped as too complex for first year units.
Action Taken
Content and assessment changes were made with a shift to considering sociological topics from an Indigenous Australian perspective. Assessment 3 required students to first discuss their selected topic from an Indigenous perspective by examining the impact of the issue on Indigenous Australian communities.
Source: Moodle
Feedback
More care needs to be taken to update lecture slides if using them from previous years.
Recommendation
Will review lectures to keep content current
Action Taken
Lecture content was revised and efforts directed to collate all lecture recordings in one area. Content and delivery style will continue to be reviewed to avoid long lectures and to support assessment preparation.
Source: Moodle
Feedback
I preferred the tutorial zoom sessions to the audio files of the lectures.
Recommendation
Will replace long-form lectures with shorter podcast style pieces
Action Taken
To complement the Crash Course Sociology resource that discusses American society, a supporting Crash Course Commentary has been added to give an Australian society commentary.
Source: Unit evaluation
Feedback
Assessment feedback to be more specific, constructive and encouraging for first year students.
Recommendation
Markers will be directed to provide: more constructive informative to direct students on how to improve on their academic performance against the marking criteria, individualised and supportive feedback when marking student assignments, and assignments will have comments and corrections included within them.
Action Taken
Nil.
Source: Unit evaluation
Feedback
Assessment task information to provide greater detail on what the assessment requires and have more explicit links to the unit content.
Recommendation
The task description in the unit profile will outline the steps on how to undertake the assignment and direct students to the aligned weekly content. Useful exemplar papers will be made available to students to demonstrate the academic standard required by students.
Action Taken
Nil.
Source: Unit evaluation
Feedback
Additional introductory videos to help students become familiar with sociology and the unit content, along with supportive tutorials and online discussion forums for students that undertake the unit from a range of backgrounds and ages.
Recommendation
Bridging videos to help explain sociological concepts and theories to students not familiar with sociology will be provided to students, particularly in the first few weeks of the unit. Students will be supported in their learning through responsive and encouraging discussions with the unit coordinator in online tutorials and discussion forums.
Action Taken
Nil.
Source: Unit Evaluation
Feedback
The lecturer/unit coordinator's (Dr Shane Hopkinson) enthusiasm for sociology.
Recommendation
Staff will continue to deliver the unit with enthusiasm and be responsive to students' individual learning needs.
Action Taken
Nil.
Source: Unit Evaluation
Feedback
Academic writing and referencing support by the Academic Learning Centre services provided in the unit.
Recommendation
Future use of the Academic Learning Centre services will be sought to provide students with expert guidance on academic writing, referencing and assignments.
Action Taken
Nil.
Unit learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this unit, you will be able to:

  1. Describe the basic features of a sociological imagination.
  2. Explain the interactions between self and society in a broad historical, cultural and social-structural context.
  3. Apply the sociological imagination to major forms of social inequality in the contemporary world, such as class, age, gender, ethnicity and sexuality.
  4. Apply sociological frameworks and ideas to current social issues.

Alignment of Assessment Tasks to Learning Outcomes
Assessment Tasks Learning Outcomes
1 2 3 4
1 - Written Assessment
2 - Written Assessment
3 - Online Quiz(zes)
Alignment of Graduate Attributes to Learning Outcomes
Introductory Level
Intermediate Level
Graduate Level
Graduate Attributes Learning Outcomes
1 2 3 4
1 - Communication
2 - Problem Solving
3 - Critical Thinking
4 - Information Literacy
6 - Information Technology Competence
7 - Cross Cultural Competence
8 - Ethical practice
Alignment of Assessment Tasks to Graduate Attributes
Introductory Level
Intermediate Level
Graduate Level
Assessment Tasks Graduate Attributes
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
1 - Written Assessment
2 - Written Assessment
3 - Online Quiz(zes)