CQUniversity Unit Profile
CRIM13007 Crimes of the Powerful
Crimes of the Powerful
All details in this unit profile for CRIM13007 have been officially approved by CQUniversity and represent a learning partnership between the University and you (our student).
The information will not be changed unless absolutely necessary and any change will be clearly indicated by an approved correction included in the profile.
General Information

Overview

While much of the criminal justice system is oriented toward street crime there are important mechanisms that seek to regulate the crimes of the powerful including white collar crime, organised crime, institutional crime and corruption. In this unit you will examine the distinctive position of each of these forms of crime and the major hurdles they present for law enforcement and the courts. You will critically examine the different institutional responses to crimes of the powerful particularly in structures of accountability and the creation of regulatory agencies. You will also discuss emerging areas of study such as systemic inequality and generational crime. This knowledge will be applied through the development of an organisational audit or compliance plan that regulates illegal behaviour.

Details

Career Level: Undergraduate
Unit Level: Level 3
Credit Points: 6
Student Contribution Band: 10
Fraction of Full-Time Student Load: 0.125

Pre-requisites or Co-requisites

There are no requisites for this unit.

Important note: Students enrolled in a subsequent unit who failed their pre-requisite unit, should drop the subsequent unit before the census date or within 10 working days of Fail grade notification. Students who do not drop the unit in this timeframe cannot later drop the unit without academic and financial liability. See details in the Assessment Policy and Procedure (Higher Education Coursework).

Offerings For Term 2 - 2022

Online

Attendance Requirements

All on-campus students are expected to attend scheduled classes – in some units, these classes are identified as a mandatory (pass/fail) component and attendance is compulsory. International students, on a student visa, must maintain a full time study load and meet both attendance and academic progress requirements in each study period (satisfactory attendance for International students is defined as maintaining at least an 80% attendance record).

Class and Assessment Overview

Recommended Student Time Commitment

Each 6-credit Undergraduate unit at CQUniversity requires an overall time commitment of an average of 12.5 hours of study per week, making a total of 150 hours for the unit.

Class Timetable

Bundaberg, Cairns, Emerald, Gladstone, Mackay, Rockhampton, Townsville
Adelaide, Brisbane, Melbourne, Perth, Sydney

Assessment Overview

1. Learning logs / diaries / Journal / log books
Weighting: 30%
2. Online Quiz(zes)
Weighting: 20%
3. Presentation
Weighting: 10%
4. Written Assessment
Weighting: 40%

Assessment Grading

This is a graded unit: your overall grade will be calculated from the marks or grades for each assessment task, based on the relative weightings shown in the table above. You must obtain an overall mark for the unit of at least 50%, or an overall grade of ‘pass’ in order to pass the unit. If any ‘pass/fail’ tasks are shown in the table above they must also be completed successfully (‘pass’ grade). You must also meet any minimum mark requirements specified for a particular assessment task, as detailed in the ‘assessment task’ section (note that in some instances, the minimum mark for a task may be greater than 50%). Consult the University’s Grades and Results Policy for more details of interim results and final grades.

Unit Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this unit, you will be able to:
  1. Debate the underlying social factors that shape crimes of the powerful in Australia and internationally
  2. Develop an accountability-based organisational audit or compliance plan
  3. Discuss different regulatory approaches to crimes of the powerful
  4. Identify the organisational factors and structures that underpin white collar, organised and institutional crime
  5. Use criminology theory to evaluate the success of anti-corruption programs.

No external accreditation is relevant to this award.

Alignment of Learning Outcomes, Assessment and Graduate Attributes
N/A Level
Introductory Level
Intermediate Level
Graduate Level
Professional Level
Advanced Level

Alignment of Assessment Tasks to Learning Outcomes

Assessment Tasks Learning Outcomes
1 2 3 4 5
1 - Written Assessment - 40%
2 - Presentation - 10%
3 - Online Quiz(zes) - 20%
4 - Learning logs / diaries / Journal / log books - 30%

Alignment of Graduate Attributes to Learning Outcomes

Graduate Attributes Learning Outcomes
1 2 3 4 5
1 - Communication
2 - Problem Solving
3 - Critical Thinking
4 - Information Literacy
5 - Team Work
6 - Information Technology Competence
7 - Cross Cultural Competence
8 - Ethical practice
9 - Social Innovation
10 - Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Cultures

Alignment of Assessment Tasks to Graduate Attributes

Assessment Tasks Graduate Attributes
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
1 - Written Assessment - 40%
2 - Presentation - 10%
3 - Online Quiz(zes) - 20%
4 - Learning logs / diaries / Journal / log books - 30%
Textbooks and Resources

Textbooks

There are no required textbooks.

IT Resources

You will need access to the following IT resources:
  • CQUniversity Student Email
  • Internet
  • Unit Website (Moodle)
Referencing Style

All submissions for this unit must use the referencing style: American Psychological Association 7th Edition (APA 7th edition)

For further information, see the Assessment Tasks.

Teaching Contacts
Kelsey Buchanan Unit Coordinator
k.e.buchanan@cqu.edu.au
Schedule
Week 1 Begin Date: 11 Jul 2022

Module/Topic

Introduction: Criminology's Class Divide

Chapter

Roche, D.L. & Friedrichs, D.O. (2018). Crimes of the Powerful: An Agenda for a Twenty-First Century Criminology. In W.S. Dekeseredy & M. Dragiewicz (Eds.) Routledge Handbook of Critical Criminology, . Routledge, pp. 180-189. https://doi-org.ezproxy.cqu.edu.au/10.4324/9781315622040

Lynch, M.J. (2018). Conflict and Crime: Marx, Engels, Marxist/Radical Criminology, and the Explanation of Crime. In Triplett, R.A. (Ed.) The Handbook of the History and Philosophy of Criminology. John Wiley & Sons. https://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/cqu/reader.action?docID=5144712&ppg=118

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 2 Begin Date: 18 Jul 2022

Module/Topic

White Collar Crime: From the Enron Scandal to the Global Financial Crisis

Chapter

Jordanoska, A. & Schoultz, I. (2019). The 'Discovery' of White-Collar Crime: The Legacy of Edwin Sutherland. In M.L. Rorie & C.F. Wellford (Eds.) The Handbook of White-Collar Crime, John Wiley & Sons, pp. 3-15. https://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/cqu/reader.action?docID=5896936&ppg=29

Benson, M.L. & Stadler, W.A. (2012). Revisiting the Guilty Mind: The Neutralisation of White-Collar Crime. Criminal Justice Review 37(4), 494-509. https://doi-org.ezproxy.cqu.edu.au/10.1177/0734016812465618

Pinsker, J. (2016, August 18). Why Aren't Any Bankers in Prison for Causing the Financial Crisis? The Atlantic. https://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2016/08/why-arent-any-bankers-in-prison-for-causing-the-financial-crisis/496232/

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 3 Begin Date: 25 Jul 2022

Module/Topic

White Collar Crime II: Tax Evasion, Money Laundering and the Panama Papers

Chapter

Anonymous (2016). The Revolution Will Be Digitised. International Consortium of Investigative Journalists. https://www.icij.org/investigations/panama-papers/20160506-john-doe-statement/

Fitzgibbon, W. (2021, April 3). The Fight Against Offshore Crime Will Be a Long Campaign. International Consortium of Investigative Journalists. https://www.icij.org/investigations/panama-papers/the-fight-against-offshore-crime-will-be-a-long-campaign/

Hillyard, P. & Tombs, S. (2007). From ‘Crime’ to Social Harm? Crime, Law & Social Change 48, 9-25. https://link-springer-com.ezproxy.cqu.edu.au/article/10.1007/s10611-007-9079-z

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 4 Begin Date: 01 Aug 2022

Module/Topic

Political Corruption I: Grand Corruption

Chapter

Funderberk, C. (2012). Political Corruption: Causes and Consequences. In C. Funderberk (Ed.) Political Corruption in Comparative Perspective: Sources, Status and Prospects. Taylor & Francis, pp. 1-18. https://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/cqu/reader.action?docID=5208371&ppg=16

Transparency International (2021). The Relationship Between Corruption and Protest. https://knowledgehub.transparency.org/assets/uploads/helpdesk/Relationship-between-corruption-and-protest_2021.pdf

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 5 Begin Date: 08 Aug 2022

Module/Topic

Political Corruption II: 'Soft' Corruption

Chapter

Schluter, W.E. (2017). Soft Corruption: The Problem. In Soft Corruption: How Unethical Conduct Undermines Good Government and What to Do About It. Rutgers University Press, pp. 1-16. https://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/cqu/detail.action?pq-origsite=primo&docID=4789870

Graycar, A. (2017). 12: Corruption. In Deckert, A. & Sarre, R. (Eds.) The Palgrave Handbook of Australian and New Zealand Criminology, Crime and Justice, Palgrave Macmillan, pp. 251-266. https://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/cqu/reader.action?docID=5123292&ppg=270

Events and Submissions/Topic

Vacation Week Begin Date: 15 Aug 2022

Module/Topic

Chapter

Events and Submissions/Topic

Quiz #1 opens Monday 15/8 9am AEST

Visual Presentation due Friday 19/8 5pm AEST


Visual Presentation Due: Vacation Week Friday (19 Aug 2022) 5:00 pm AEST
Week 6 Begin Date: 22 Aug 2022

Module/Topic

Crimes of the State: Crimes Against Humanity and International Criminal Law

Chapter

Rothe, D.L. (2008). A Glance Into State Criminality. In State Criminality: The Crime of All Crimes, Lexington Books, pp. 52-69. https://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/cqu/reader.action?docID=1043786&ppg=52

Bassiouini, M.C. (2010). Introduction: Crimes of State and Other Forms of Collective Group Violence by Non-State Actors. In Rothe et.al. (Eds.) State Crime: Current Perspectives, Rutgers University Press, pp. 1-21. https://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/cqu/reader.action?docID=816482&ppg=14

Mullins, C.W. (2010). The Current Status and Role of the International Criminal Court. In Rothe et.al. (Eds.) State Crime: Current Perspectives, Rutgers University Press, pp. 275-292. https://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/cqu/reader.action?docID=816482&ppg=288

Events and Submissions/Topic

Quiz #1 closes Monday 22/8 9am AEST

Workbook submission #1 due Friday 26/8 5pm AEST

Week 7 Begin Date: 29 Aug 2022

Module/Topic

Crimes of Colonialism

Chapter

Agozino, B. (2003). Introduction. In Counter-Colonial Criminology: A Critique of Imperialist Reason. Pluto Press, pp. 1-12. https://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/cqu/reader.action?docID=3386251&ppg=13

Cunneen, C. & Porter, A. (2017). 44: Indigenous Peoples and Criminal Justice in Australia. In Deckert, A. & Sarre, R. (eds.) The Palgrave Handbook of Australian and New Zealand Criminology, Crime and Justice. Palgrave Macmillan, pp. 667-682. https://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/cqu/reader.action?docID=5123292&ppg=669

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 8 Begin Date: 05 Sep 2022

Module/Topic

Police Corruption and Brutality

Chapter

Punch, M. (2000). Police Corruption and its Prevention. European Journal on Criminal Policy and Research 8(3), 301-324. https://link-springer-com.ezproxy.cqu.edu.au/article/10.1023/A%3A1008777013115

Cunneen, C. (2020, September 30). "The Torment of Our Powerlessness": Police Violence Against Aboriginal People in Australia. Harvard International Review. https://hir.harvard.edu/police-violence-australia-aboriginals/

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 9 Begin Date: 12 Sep 2022

Module/Topic

Corporate Crime: Wage Theft and Exploitation

Chapter

Four Corners (2015). 7-Eleven: The Price of Convenience [Video]. ABC News/Clickview. https://clickv.ie/w/Swrq

Davies, J. (2020). Criminological Reflections on the Regulation and Governance of Labour Exploitation. Trends in Organised Crime 23(1), 57-76. http://dx.doi.org.ezproxy.cqu.edu.au/10.1007/s12117-019-09370-x

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 10 Begin Date: 19 Sep 2022

Module/Topic

Environmental Crime and Green Criminology

Chapter

White, R. & Monod, S.W. (2017). 41: Green Criminology. In Deckert, A. & Sarre, R. (Eds.) The Palgrave Handbook of Australian and New Zealand Criminology, Crime and Justice, Palgrave Macmillan, pp. 617-631. https://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/cqu/reader.action?docID=5123292&ppg=621

Bittle, S. & Hebert, J. (2019). Chapter 30: Controlling Corporate Crimes in Times of De-regulation and Re-regulation. In Rorie, M.L. & Wellford, C.F. (Eds.) The Handbook of White-Collar Crime, John Wiley & Sons, pp. 484-498. https://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/cqu/reader.action?docID=5896936&ppg=510

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 11 Begin Date: 26 Sep 2022

Module/Topic

All In Cahoots: Organised Crime, State-Corporate Crime and Capitalist Political Economy

Chapter

Rothe, D.L. & Kauzlarich, D. (2016). Power, Organised Crime Networks, and the Elite. In Crimes of the Powerful: An Introduction, Routledge, London, pp. 134-145. https://doi-org.ezproxy.cqu.edu.au/10.4324/9781315756776

Kupatadze, A. (2015). Political Corruption in Eurasia: Understanding Collusion Between States, Organised Crime and Business. Theoretical Criminology 19(2), 198-215. https://doi-org.ezproxy.cqu.edu.au/10.1177/1362480615574404

Events and Submissions/Topic

Week 12 Begin Date: 03 Oct 2022

Module/Topic

Recap: Towards a Power-Conscious Criminology?

Chapter

Kramer, R.C. (2016). State Crime, the Prophetic Voice and Public Criminology Activism. Critical Criminology 24(4), 519-532. https://link-springer-com.ezproxy.cqu.edu.au/article/10.1007/s10612-016-9331-x

Events and Submissions/Topic

Quiz #2 opens Monday 3/10 9am AEST

Workbook submission #2 due Friday 7/10 5pm AEST


Workbooks Due: Week 12 Friday (7 Oct 2022) 5:00 pm AEST
Review/Exam Week Begin Date: 10 Oct 2022

Module/Topic

Chapter

Events and Submissions/Topic

Quiz #2 closes Monday 10/10 9am AEST

Case Study and Proposal due Friday 14/10 5pm AEST


Online Quizzes Due: Review/Exam Week Monday (10 Oct 2022) 9:00 am AEST
Case Study and Policy Proposal Due: Review/Exam Week Friday (14 Oct 2022) 5:00 pm AEST
Exam Week Begin Date: 17 Oct 2022

Module/Topic

Chapter

Events and Submissions/Topic

Assessment Tasks

1 Learning logs / diaries / Journal / log books

Assessment Title
Workbooks

Task Description

Your workbook will consist of weekly exercises or reflections designed to facilitate your engagement with the course material and active participation in workshops and learning activities. Each workshop will be structured around an activity or challenge that helps you to explore, put into practice and discuss the key concepts and ideas we learn in set readings and modules each week. Workbook tasks will build from these activities - these submissions are where you can reflect on the course material and workshop activities, demonstrate your engagement and show what you have learnt. Details of the workbook tasks will be contained in the weekly Learning Modules.

You will submit your workbook in two parts: one in week 6 and one in week 12. For your first submission you will choose any 3 workbook tasks from weeks 2-6. For your second you will choose 3 more from weeks 7-11. Each task should be approximately 350 words in length (no less than 300). They will be worth 5% each (x6) for a total of 30%.

Some activities may involve/benefit from working in small groups. If you are unable to attend the workshops at the designated time, it would be a good idea reach out to your peers on Moodle forums/Teams and set up a study group at your convenience.


Assessment Due Date

Week 12 Friday (7 Oct 2022) 5:00 pm AEST


Return Date to Students

Exam Week Friday (21 Oct 2022)


Weighting
30%

Assessment Criteria

  • Active engagement in course material and activities
  • Understanding of key concepts and ideas from the course and ability to creatively apply these to concrete situations
  • Demonstration of and reflection on your learning process
  • Clear and succinct reflections
  • Participation in group activities and supporting your peers' learning.


Referencing Style

Submission

No submission method provided.


Learning Outcomes Assessed
  • Debate the underlying social factors that shape crimes of the powerful in Australia and internationally
  • Discuss different regulatory approaches to crimes of the powerful
  • Use criminology theory to evaluate the success of anti-corruption programs.


Graduate Attributes
  • Critical Thinking
  • Information Literacy
  • Cross Cultural Competence

2 Online Quiz(zes)

Assessment Title
Online Quizzes

Task Description

Two online quizzes will take place: one after week 5 (opening during the break) and one on week 12. These are designed to help you gauge your comprehension and help you to engage with course content, and will be based only on the set readings and content contained in weekly learning modules. No further research will be required, and you will not be tested on content from optional or additional readings.

Each quiz will contain 10 questions drawn randomly from a larger pool. Questions will be worth 1% each for a total of 20% (10% per quiz). The first quiz will assess content from weeks 1-5, and the second will assess weeks 6-11.

Quizzes will open on Monday mornings and remain open for one week. Once you begin, you will have 24 hours to complete them. You will be able to save your progress and return to the quizzes at any point within the 24 hours.


Number of Quizzes

1


Frequency of Quizzes

Other


Assessment Due Date

Review/Exam Week Monday (10 Oct 2022) 9:00 am AEST


Return Date to Students

Exam Week Friday (21 Oct 2022)


Weighting
20%

Assessment Criteria

  • Comprehension of set reading materials and module content
  • Application of key concepts from the readings to topics in this unit
  • Evaluating and responding to questions using evidence provided in set reading materials.


Referencing Style

Submission

No submission method provided.


Learning Outcomes Assessed
  • Identify the organisational factors and structures that underpin white collar, organised and institutional crime
  • Use criminology theory to evaluate the success of anti-corruption programs.


Graduate Attributes
  • Problem Solving
  • Critical Thinking
  • Information Literacy

3 Presentation

Assessment Title
Visual Presentation

Task Description

For this assessment you will find your own example (not contained in the course material) of either white-collar crime or corruption. You will create a presentation with images and/or visual cues that explain your chosen case - it might be a map, an interactive timeline, graphs, diagrams, flowcharts, animated slideshows, your art... get as creative as you like! The idea is that you use these visuals to demonstrate your understanding of its complexities and the interrelationships between different actors/events/laws/norms/power structures etc. How you choose to represent your case will depend on what it is and how best to visually represent what happened.

You will also supplement your visuals with 400-500 words of text. It is up to you if/how you might want to integrate the text in with your visuals.


Assessment Due Date

Vacation Week Friday (19 Aug 2022) 5:00 pm AEST


Return Date to Students

Week 7 Friday (2 Sept 2022)


Weighting
10%

Assessment Criteria

  • Clear and concise explanation of chosen case study
  • Creating a helpful and accurate visual representation of key actors and/or events
  • Creative thinking in response to the task
  • Understanding the nature of white-collar crime/corruption and utilising key concepts and theories from the course material.


Referencing Style

Submission
Online

Learning Outcomes Assessed
  • Develop an accountability-based organisational audit or compliance plan


Graduate Attributes
  • Communication
  • Problem Solving
  • Ethical practice

4 Written Assessment

Assessment Title
Case Study and Policy Proposal

Task Description

For your final assessment, you will find an example of a crime of the powerful relating to any one of the topics from weeks 2-11.

In Part I (~850-900 words) you will explain and analyse your chosen case. You may discuss what sort of crime it is; what happened and who was involved; the power dynamics at play; the legal and regulatory framework that relates to it; the repercussions of the crime; and the consequences faced by the perpetrators (if any).

In Part II (~850-900 words) you will present a proposal for how such crimes should be dealt with going forward and improving accountability in this space. Your proposal may be preventative in nature, or it can deal with punishment. It can suggest (for example) laws and legislation, regulations or regulatory bodies, internal policy, or ways to deal with the issue in the law enforcement or the judicial system.

You may wish to propose an idea that has already been suggested by others or successfully implemented elsewhere, or come up with your own. Either way, the important thing is that your recommendation clearly addresses the issues raised by your chosen case, and is justified by research and evidence. You should also be utilising and applying key concepts/theories/ideas from the course content, and be engaging with broader discussions about how we deal with crimes of the powerful and better prevent or respond to abuses of power in society.

You must do research and include references for both Part I and Part II. References are to be formatted according to APA 7 style guide.

Word count: 1750 words total.


Assessment Due Date

Review/Exam Week Friday (14 Oct 2022) 5:00 pm AEST


Return Date to Students

Exam Week Friday (21 Oct 2022)


Weighting
40%

Assessment Criteria

  • Critical analysis of chosen case study
  • Awareness of legal and regulatory frameworks that apply to chosen case
  • Understanding of key concepts and ideas from the course material and the role of power in chosen case
  • Critical engagement with debates on how to prevent or respond to abuses of power and ensure accountability
  • Clear and succinct written expression
  • Sufficient academic research and accurate referencing according to APA 7 style guide


Referencing Style

Submission
Online

Learning Outcomes Assessed
  • Debate the underlying social factors that shape crimes of the powerful in Australia and internationally
  • Develop an accountability-based organisational audit or compliance plan
  • Discuss different regulatory approaches to crimes of the powerful
  • Identify the organisational factors and structures that underpin white collar, organised and institutional crime


Graduate Attributes
  • Communication
  • Problem Solving
  • Critical Thinking
  • Information Literacy
  • Cross Cultural Competence
  • Ethical practice

Academic Integrity Statement

As a CQUniversity student you are expected to act honestly in all aspects of your academic work.

Any assessable work undertaken or submitted for review or assessment must be your own work. Assessable work is any type of work you do to meet the assessment requirements in the unit, including draft work submitted for review and feedback and final work to be assessed.

When you use the ideas, words or data of others in your assessment, you must thoroughly and clearly acknowledge the source of this information by using the correct referencing style for your unit. Using others’ work without proper acknowledgement may be considered a form of intellectual dishonesty.

Participating honestly, respectfully, responsibly, and fairly in your university study ensures the CQUniversity qualification you earn will be valued as a true indication of your individual academic achievement and will continue to receive the respect and recognition it deserves.

As a student, you are responsible for reading and following CQUniversity’s policies, including the Student Academic Integrity Policy and Procedure. This policy sets out CQUniversity’s expectations of you to act with integrity, examples of academic integrity breaches to avoid, the processes used to address alleged breaches of academic integrity, and potential penalties.

What is a breach of academic integrity?

A breach of academic integrity includes but is not limited to plagiarism, self-plagiarism, collusion, cheating, contract cheating, and academic misconduct. The Student Academic Integrity Policy and Procedure defines what these terms mean and gives examples.

Why is academic integrity important?

A breach of academic integrity may result in one or more penalties, including suspension or even expulsion from the University. It can also have negative implications for student visas and future enrolment at CQUniversity or elsewhere. Students who engage in contract cheating also risk being blackmailed by contract cheating services.

Where can I get assistance?

For academic advice and guidance, the Academic Learning Centre (ALC) can support you in becoming confident in completing assessments with integrity and of high standard.

What can you do to act with integrity?