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CB94 - Bachelor of Laws and Bachelor of Arts

Overview

Course Overview

The Bachelor of Laws and Bachelor of Arts course provides you with double qualifications and skills that are well regarded in both the private and public sectors. The Bachelor of Arts provides you with a multidisciplinary education that encourages you to gain knowledge in a range of arts, humanities and social science disciplines. You will explore disciplines that study the way humans recognise, record and debate human practices, meanings and values. This will aid you in developing contemporary understandings both of the human condition and of how society operates. The Bachelor of Laws course satisfies the academic requirement for admission as a legal practitioner. Law graduates are also required to undergo a period of practical legal training before admission as a legal practitioner in Australia. A law degree will provide you with the qualifications to pursue a number of careers in the field of law, including solicitor, barrister, government legal officer, judicial officer, law academic, company director, in-house counsel, diplomat and politician.

Career Information

A law degree will provide graduates with the qualifications to pursue a number of careers in the field of law, including solicitor, barrister, government legal officer, judicial officer, law academic, company director, in-house counsel, diplomat, and politician. Depending on units and majors chosen, an arts degree enables students to work in a number of careers, including advertising, arts administration, book editing, government administration and planning, communications, copywriting, desk-top publishing, editing, environmental planning and management, geography, history, journalism, librarianship, research, nature and heritage conservation, political research, psychology, teaching, welfare, writing (various), and many more.

Course Details
Duration 5 years full-time or 10 years part-time
Credit Points that Must be Earned 240
Number of Units Required CQUniversity uses the concept of credits to express the amount of study required for a particular course and individual units. The number of units varies between courses. Units in undergraduate courses normally consist of 6 points of credit or multiples thereof (e.g. 12, 18, 24).
Expected Hours of Study One point of credit is equivalent to an expectation of approximately two hours of student work per week in a term.
Course Type Undergraduate Double Degree
Qualification (post nominal) LLB/BA
AQF Level Level 7: Bachelor Degree
Course Fees
Indicative Year - 2024
  • Commonwealth Supported Place – Indicative First Year Fee - $16,320
  • Domestic Full Fee Paying – Indicative First Year Fee - $17,556
  • International Indicative First Term Fee - $17,520
  • International Indicative First Year Fee - $34,740
Indicative Year - 2023
  • Commonwealth Supported Place – Indicative First Year Fee - $15,136
Indicative Year - 2022
  • Commonwealth Supported Place – Indicative First Year Fee - $14,624

Admission Codes

Domestic Students
Tertiary Admission Centre Codes (TAC) Codes
International Students
CRICOS Codes
Not Applicable
Where and when can I start?
Units offered internally at the below campuses may be delivered using a combination of face-to-face and video conferencing style teaching.
Units offered via MIX mode are delivered online and require compulsory attendance of site-specific learning activities such as on-campus residential schools, placements and/or work integrated learning. See Course Features tab for further information. Online units are delivered using online resources only.
Please Click Here for more information.
The following tables list the courses availabilities by location and term. Directing your pointer over your preferred location will provide further information if this course is not available for the full duration. Please be sure to also check individual unit availability by location and term prior to enrolling.

Domestic Availability

Term 3 - 2024

Online

Term 2 - 2024

Online

Term 1 - 2024

Online

Term 3 - 2023

Online

Term 2 - 2023

Online

Term 1 - 2023

Online

Term 3 - 2022

Online

Term 2 - 2022

Online

Term 1 - 2022

Online

Term 3 - 2021

Online

Term 2 - 2021

Online

Term 1 - 2021

Online

Term 3 - 2020

Online

Term 2 - 2020

Online

Term 1 - 2020

Online

Term 3 - 2019

Online

Term 2 - 2019

Online

Term 1 - 2019

Online

Term 3 - 2018

Distance

Term 2 - 2018

Distance

Term 1 - 2018

Distance

Term 3 - 2017

Distance

Term 2 - 2017

Distance

Term 1 - 2017

Distance

Term 3 - 2016

Distance

Term 2 - 2016

Distance

Term 1 - 2016

Distance

Term 3 - 2015

Distance

Term 2 - 2015

Distance

Term 1 - 2015

Distance

Term 3 - 2014

Distance

Term 2 - 2014

Distance

Term 1 - 2014

Distance
Show All

International Availability

Term 3 - 2024

Sorry, no international availabilities found.

Term 2 - 2024

Sorry, no international availabilities found.

Term 1 - 2024

Sorry, no international availabilities found.

Term 3 - 2023

Sorry, no international availabilities found.

Term 2 - 2023

Sorry, no international availabilities found.

Term 1 - 2023

Sorry, no international availabilities found.

Term 3 - 2022

Sorry, no international availabilities found.

Term 2 - 2022

Sorry, no international availabilities found.

Term 1 - 2022

Sorry, no international availabilities found.

Term 3 - 2021

Sorry, no international availabilities found.

Term 2 - 2021

Sorry, no international availabilities found.

Term 1 - 2021

Sorry, no international availabilities found.

Term 3 - 2020

Sorry, no international availabilities found.

Term 2 - 2020

Sorry, no international availabilities found.

Term 1 - 2020

Sorry, no international availabilities found.

Term 3 - 2019

Sorry, no international availabilities found.

Term 2 - 2019

Sorry, no international availabilities found.

Term 1 - 2019

Sorry, no international availabilities found.

Term 3 - 2018

Sorry, no international availabilities found.

Term 2 - 2018

Sorry, no international availabilities found.

Term 1 - 2018

Sorry, no international availabilities found.

Term 3 - 2017

Sorry, no international availabilities found.

Term 2 - 2017

Sorry, no international availabilities found.

Term 1 - 2017

Sorry, no international availabilities found.

Term 3 - 2016

Sorry, no international availabilities found.

Term 2 - 2016

Sorry, no international availabilities found.

Term 1 - 2016

Sorry, no international availabilities found.

Term 3 - 2015

Sorry, no international availabilities found.

Term 2 - 2015

Sorry, no international availabilities found.

Term 1 - 2015

Sorry, no international availabilities found.

Term 3 - 2014

Sorry, no international availabilities found.

Term 2 - 2014

Sorry, no international availabilities found.

Term 1 - 2014

Sorry, no international availabilities found.
Show All
For any problems regarding admissions availability for the selected course please contact 13 CQUni (13 27 86) or send us an email at http://contactus.cqu.edu.au/
What do I need to start?
Entry Scores
Rank Threshold SR 74.00 | ATAR 74.00
Entry Requirements

English (Units 3 & 4, C) or equivalent

English Language Proficiency Requirements:

If you were not born in Australia, Canada, New Zealand, United Kingdom, Ireland, South Africa or United States of America, you are required to meet the English Language Proficiency requirements set by the University. Applicants are required to provide evidence of completion of:

  • A secondary qualification (Year 11 and 12, or equivalent), or
  • An Australian Qualifications Framework (AQF) diploma level qualification, or
  • Bachelor level qualification study for a period of at least 2 years fulltime with a minimum overall GPA 4.0

Completed within Australia, Canada, New Zealand, United Kingdom, South Africa, Ireland or United States of America, which will meet the English proficiency.

If you do not satisfy any of the above, you will need to undertake an English language proficiency test and achieve the following scores:

  • An International English Language Testing System (IELTS Academic) overall band score of at least 6.0 with a minimum 5.5 in each subset; or
  • Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) - Requires 550 or better overall and minimum TWE score of 4.5 (Paper Based Test), or 75 or better overall and no score less than 17 (Internet Based Test); or
  • Pearson Test of English Academic (PTE Academic) - Requires an overall score of 54 with no sub-score less than 46; or
  • An Occupational English Test with Grades A or B only in each of the four components.

English test results remain valid for no more than two years between final examination date and the date of commencement of study, and must appear on a single result certificate.

Each student will be assessed individually.

Security Requirements

The capstone unit LAWS12073 Legal Practicum may have security requirements if students choose an overseas placement. Legal Practicum students will be given orientation with regards to applied ethics in the workplace; professional obligations.

Health Requirements

Immunisation may be required for overseas excursions.

Assumed Knowledge

English

Fees and Charges
Course Features

Awards and Accreditation

Interim Awards CF36 - Diploma of Arts CG98 - Bachelor of Laws
Exit Awards CF36 - Diploma of Arts CL95 - Associate Degree of Paralegal Studies CL96 - Diploma of Legal Studies CG98 - Bachelor of Laws
Accreditation
  • Professional Practice: Core
    Legal Practitioners Admissions Board (Queensland)

    Legal Practitioners Admissions Board of Queensland

    The degree is an approved academic qualification for admission to the legal profession. Graduates are also required to undertake a further period of practical legal training before being admitted as a legal practitioner.


Residential School Requirements

No Residential School for this course.

Practicum/Work Placement

LAWS12073 - Students will be able to undertake at their option an overseas or domestic practicum placement or engagement with a complex work simulation.

Previous and Current Enrolments

Year Number of Students
2023 13
2022 19
2021 21
2020 17
2019 16
Inherent Requirements
There are Inherent Requirements (IRs) that you need to be aware of, and fulfil, to achieve the core learning outcomes of the units and course. IRs are the essential capabilities, knowledge, behaviours and skills that are needed to complete a unit or course.

Please note that in some instances there may be similarities between course, entry and inherent requirements.

If you experience difficulties meeting these requirements, reasonable adjustments may be made upon contacting accessibility@cqu.edu.au. Adjustment must not compromise the academic integrity of the degree or course chosen at CQUniversity or the legal requirements of field education.

Ethical Behaviour

Examples are:

  • Complying with with academic and non-academic misconduct policies and procedures such as CQUniversity’s Student Charter, Student Misconduct Policy and Student Behavioural Misconduct Procedures, and Assessment Policy and Procedure (Higher Education Coursework).
  • Demonstrating honesty and integrity in the academic, humanities and social science and legal context.
  • Maintaining strict client confidentiality if accepted for a work placement with a law firm.
Behavioural Stability

Examples are:

  • Reflecting on personal behaviours appropriate for various humanities and social science experiences and responding positively and professionally.
  • Processing constructive feedback or criticism from a supervisor/lecturer and responding with appropriate behaviour.
  • Interacting with people from a wide range of backgrounds and cultures in a calm and composed manner in difficult to deal with situations.
  • Demonstrating respectful and courteous behaviour in your dealing with colleagues and staff at the University and with clients and support staff if involved in a work placement.
  • Approaching difficult situations with diplomacy and professionalism.
  • Successfully processing and coping with your own emotions and behaviour when faced with challenging and confronting individuals and/or cases in the professional environment.
Legal Compliance

Examples are:

  • Complying with the policies and practices of professional organisations which regulate such issues as copyright, plagiarism, liable and fair use laws in relation to humanities and social science disciplines.
  • Complying with the requirements for student registration with the Law Society or Bar Association in your state or territory.
  • Maintaining a reputation as a fit and proper person for registration as a solicitor or barrister in accordance with the rules for admission in your state or territory.
Communication Skills (Verbal, Non-verbal, Written and Technology)

Examples are:

  • Verbally communicating in the English language with accuracy, appropriateness and effectiveness.
  • Actively participating in discussion activities related to the course.
  • Using language that is appropriate to the context of the individual, group, professional context or workplace.
  • Using legal language that is courteous, professional and appropriate to the context of the individual or group.
  • Establishing rapport with clients in the delivery of Law practice and respond appropriately to clients, supervisors and other professionals.
  • Using your nominated humanities and social science disciplines to communicate with an audience both inside and outside the university.
  • Using appropriate facial expressions: eye contact, being mindful of space, time boundaries, a range of body movements and gestures.
  • Recognising and interpreting non-verbal cues of others and responding appropriately during activities related to the course, as well as during professional placement.
  • Competently and appropriately producing written assessment work in a logical, coherent manner, and with correct grammar and punctuation, and referencing to the required academic standards and conventions.
  • Expressing the required information in a logical and legible report or other written format that clearly communicates the intended message, and doing so in a timely manner that meets professional standards.
  • Accurately conveying and documenting information in a written form that meets humanities and social science practice and/or legal and professional practice requirements.
  • Expressing complex and detailed legal information and knowledge into logical, legible and coherent legal documents that meet professional standards and clearly communicates the required content or message.
  • Using sufficient computer knowledge and skills to engage in the online learning environment that may include completing relevant on-line assessments and participating in on-line forums and/or accessing, reading and responding to emails.
  • Regularly accessing the Internet for research, and email for communication with peers and lecturers.
  • Using a variety of computer programs suitable to your course of study.
Cognitive Abilities (Knowledge and Cognitive Skills, Literacy and Numeracy)

Examples are:

  • Conceptualising and using appropriate humanities and social science and legal knowledge in response to academic assessment items.
  • Applying theoretical and other relevant knowledge, research evidence, policies and procedures in humanities and social science and/or legal practice.
  • Constructing written text proficiently, in English, using appropriate vocabulary and conventions of speech, including being able to paraphrase, summarise and reference in accordance with appropriate academic conventions.
  • Competently reading, writing and accurately interpreting information to convey language effectively in humanities and social science projects and practices.
  • Producing accurate, concise and clear humanities and social science documentation.
  • Demonstrating active listening skills while on work placement.
  • Competently and accurately receiving communication from another person and processing that legal and/or client information and circumstances, and be able to repeat those communication messages with precision.
  • Paraphrasing and summarising received verbal communication effectively.
  • Demonstrating an understanding of complex commercial transactions that involve numeracy skills.
  • Applying numeracy skills to interpret and solve a range of legal matters that involve (but are not limited to) damages, compensation, interest and other monetary payments in litigation.
Relational Skills

Examples are:

  • Development of active listening skills to facilitate effective communication, avoid miscommunication and arrive at accurate conclusions.
  • Patience and avoiding or diffusing interpersonal conflict.
  • Trustworthiness and confidentiality.
  • Approachability and warmth to facilitate communication and encourage innovation and mutual cooperation.
Reflective Skills

Examples are:

  • Reflecting on topics taught during the course.
  • Reflecting on personal situations that may be difficult and sensitive.
  • Identifying when an issue or circumstance arises that could affect your objectivity or professional judgement, and be able to take an appropriate course of action.
  • Identifying when your own experiences may potentially negatively influence your objectivity or professional judgement.
  • Development of an 'active, dynamic action-based and ethical set of skills, placed in real time and dealing with real, complex and difficult situations' (Moon, J. (1999), Reflection in Learning and Professional Development: Theory and Practice, Kogan Page, London).
  • Implement a six step process: read, ask, watch, feel, talk and think. (see Neil Thomson, People Skills, Palgrave MacMillan 2015).
  • Enhancing the ability to mirror, paraphrase and restate feelings, emotions and words of others to fully understand the communication.
Sustainable Performance

Examples are:

  • Reading and comprehension of vast amounts of text and oral information as the basis of formal decision making.
  • Breaking down information into a context that can be understood within a team.
  • Managing lengthy complex meetings.
  • Planning time and workload effectively including the ability to self-manage competing commitments and take responsibility for own wellbeing.
Interpersonal Engagement

Examples are:

  • Actively listening to others with the purpose of gathering information and engaging with the speaker.
  • Being a dependable person that can be relied upon in any given situation.
  • Having emotional intelligence to understand the needs and feelings of others.
  • Being an effective leader using interpersonal skills to make decisions.
  • Having the ability to work in a team.
Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Abilities

Examples are:

  • Competently using a desktop operating system such as Microsoft Windows or Mac OS X.
  • Accessing a computer for your studies, and possessing sufficient computer knowledge and skills to engage in the on-line learning environment that may include completing relevant on-line assessments and participating in on-line forums or responding to emails.
  • Regularly accessing the Internet for research, and email for communication with peers and lecturers.
  • Using a variety of computer programs suitable to your course of study.
  • Students must have reliable access to both the Internet and to a computer capable of internet-based video conferencing, e.g. Zoom. under Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Abilities.
Core Learning Outcomes
Please refer to the Core Structure Learning Outcomes
Creative Writing Learning Outcomes
  • 1. Law: Knowledge Graduates of the Bachelor of Laws will demonstrate an understanding of a coherent body of knowledge that includes: (a) the fundamental areas of legal knowledge, the Australian legal system, and underlying principles and concepts, including international and comparative contexts, (b) the broader contexts within which legal issues arise, and (c) the principles and values of justice and of ethical practice in lawyers’ roles.
  • 2. Law: Ethics and Professional Responsibility Graduates of the Bachelor of Laws will demonstrate: (a) an understanding of approaches to ethical decision-making, (b) an ability to recognise and reflect upon, and a developing ability to respond to, ethical issues likely to arise in professional contexts, (c) an ability to recognise and reflect upon the professional responsibilities of lawyers in promoting justice and in service to the community, and (d) a developing ability to exercise professional judgement.
  • 3. Law: Thinking skills Graduates of the Bachelor of Laws will be able to: (a) identify and articulate legal issues, (b) apply legal reasoning and research to generate appropriate responses to legal issues, (c) engage in critical analysis and make a reasoned choice amongst alternatives, and (d) think creatively in approaching legal issues and generating appropriate responses.
  • 4. Law: Research Skills Graduates of the Bachelor of Laws will demonstrate the intellectual and practical skills needed to identify, research, evaluate and synthesise relevant factual, legal and policy issues.
  • 5. Law: Communication and Collaboration Graduates of the Bachelor of Laws will be able to: (a) communicate in ways that are effective, appropriate and persuasive for legal and non-legal audiences, and (b) collaborate effectively.
  • 6. Law: Self-management Graduates of the Bachelor of Laws will be able to: (a) learn and work independently, and (b) reflect on and assess their own capabilities and performance, and make use of feedback as appropriate, to support personal and professional development.
  • 7. Technology and innovation. Graduates of the Bachelor of Laws will be able to: (a) evaluate the impact of technology and innovation principles on fundamental areas of legal knowledge and legal practice, such as blockchain, AI and automation, (b) critically analyse the legal and policy frameworks governing technology, including AI, automation and disruptive technologies, (c) explore the ethical implications of technology, including governance issues, privacy risk and data integrity, and (d) examine the potential for technology, innovation principles and the law to create or contribute to positive social change.
  • 8. Cultural competence and First Nations Peoples' perspectives. Graduates of the Bachelor of Laws will be able to: (a) respect cultural diversity, debate, and operate with ideas and actions from different cultural perspectives, (b) understand First Nations Peoples’ culture and legal traditions and critically evaluate the impact of Western systems of law, regulation and governance from the perspective of First Nations Peoples' cultures, (c) engage in reflective self-evaluation of personal cultural values and perspectives, and (d) evaluate the impact of cultural differences and language proficiency on a lawyer's ability to act on behalf of a client or stakeholder.
  • 9. Arts: Apply critical and analytical thinking in order to explain a coherent body of disciplinary knowledge.
  • 10. Arts: Identify discipline relevant problems, evaluate possible solutions, adapt and apply the knowledge gained.
  • 11. Arts: Develop and demonstrate research skills appropriate to the Arts discipline.
  • 12. Arts: Learn and work independently and collaboratively with academic integrity.
  • 13. Arts: Identify and respond to ethical issues in a range of contexts.
  • 14. Arts: Communicate cogent arguments and/or research results in appropriate oral and written formats.
  Course Learning Outcomes
Australian Qualifications Framework Descriptors 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14
1. KNOWLEDGE Have a broad and coherent body of knowledge, with depth in the underlying principles and concepts in one or more disciplines as a basis for independent lifelong learning
2. SKILLS Have cognitive skills to review critically, analyse, consolidate and synthesise knowledge
3. SKILLS Have cognitive and technical skills to demonstrate a broad understanding of knowledge with depth in some areas
4. SKILLS Have cognitive and creative skills to exercise critical thinking and judgement in identifying and solving problems with intellectual independence
5. SKILLS Have communication skills to present a clear, coherent and independent exposition of knowledge and ideas
6. APPLICATION OF KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS Demonstrate initiative and judgement in planning, problem solving and decision making in professional practice and/or scholarship
7. APPLICATION OF KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS Adapt knowledge and skills in diverse contexts
8. APPLICATION OF KNOWLEDGE & SKILL Be responsible and accountable for own learning and professional practice and in collaboration with others within broad parameters
KNOWLEDGE Develop an understanding and appreciation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and culture in contemporary and historical context using the respectful and appropriate protocols and terminology
APPLICATION OF KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS Engage in reflective self-evaluation of own cultural values and perspectives to proactively create an inclusive workplace that affirms and celebrates cultural diversity
APPLICATION OF KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS Display leadership by creating inclusive work environments and work with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in a culturally respectful manner
English and Cultural Studies Learning Outcomes
  • 1. Knowledge Graduates of the Bachelor of Laws will demonstrate an understanding of a coherent body of knowledge that includes: (a) the fundamental areas of legal knowledge, the Australian legal system, and underlying principles and concepts, including international and comparative contexts, (b) the broader contexts within which legal issues arise, and ( c) the principles and values of justice and of ethical practice in lawyers’ roles.
  • 2. Ethics and Professional Responsibility Graduates of the Bachelor of Laws will demonstrate: (a) an understanding of approaches to ethical decision-making, (b) an ability to recognise and reflect upon, and a developing ability to respond to, ethical issues likely to arise in professional contexts, (c) an ability to recognise and reflect upon the professional responsibilities of lawyers in promoting justice and in service to the community, and (d) a developing ability to exercise professional judgement.
  • 3. Thinking skills Graduates of the Bachelor of Laws will be able to: (a) identify and articulate legal issues, (b) apply legal reasoning and research to generate appropriate responses to legal issues, (c) engage in critical analysis and make a reasoned choice amongst alternatives, and (d) think creatively in approaching legal issues and generating appropriate responses.
  • 4. Research Skills Graduates of the Bachelor of Laws will demonstrate the intellectual and practical skills needed to identify, research, evaluate and synthesise relevant factual, legal and policy issues.
  • 5. Communication and Collaboration Graduates of the Bachelor of Laws will be able to: (a) communicate in ways that are effective, appropriate and persuasive for legal and non-legal audiences, and (b) collaborate effectively.
  • 6. Self-management Graduates of the Bachelor of Laws will be able to: (a) learn and work independently, and (b) reflect on and assess their own capabilities and performance, and make use of feedback as appropriate, to support personal and professional development.
  • 7. Technology and innovation. Graduates of the Bachelor of Laws will be able to: (a) evaluate the impact of technology and innovation principles on fundamental areas of legal knowledge and legal practice, such as blockchain, AI and automation, (b) critically analyse the legal and policy frameworks governing technology, including AI, automation and disruptive technologies, (c) explore the ethical implications of technology, including governance issues, privacy risk and data integrity, and (d) examine the potential for technology, innovation principles and the law to create or contribute to positive social change.
  • 8. Cultural competence and First Nations Peoples' perspectives. Graduates of the Bachelor of Laws will be able to: (a) respect cultural diversity, debate, and operate with ideas and actions from different cultural perspectives, (b) understand First Nations Peoples’ culture and legal traditions and critically evaluate the impact of Western systems of law, regulation and governance from the perspective of First Nations Peoples' cultures, (c) engage in reflective self-evaluation of personal cultural values and perspectives, and (d) evaluate the impact of cultural differences and language proficiency on a lawyer's ability to act on behalf of a client or stakeholder.
  • 9. Apply critical and analytical thinking in order to explain a coherent body of disciplinary knowledge
  • 10. Identify discipline relevant problems, evaluate possible solutions, adapt and apply the knowledge gained
  • 11. Develop and demonstrate research skills appropriate to the arts discipline
  • 12. Learn and work independently and collaboratively with academic integrity
  • 13. Identify and respond to ethical issues in a range of contexts
  • 14. Communicate cogent arguments and/or research results in appropriate oral and written formats.
  Course Learning Outcomes
Australian Qualifications Framework Descriptors 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14
1. KNOWLEDGE Have a broad and coherent body of knowledge, with depth in the underlying principles and concepts in one or more disciplines as a basis for independent lifelong learning
2. SKILLS Have cognitive skills to review critically, analyse, consolidate and synthesise knowledge
3. SKILLS Have cognitive and technical skills to demonstrate a broad understanding of knowledge with depth in some areas
4. SKILLS Have cognitive and creative skills to exercise critical thinking and judgement in identifying and solving problems with intellectual independence
5. SKILLS Have communication skills to present a clear, coherent and independent exposition of knowledge and ideas
6. APPLICATION OF KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS Demonstrate initiative and judgement in planning, problem solving and decision making in professional practice and/or scholarship
7. APPLICATION OF KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS Adapt knowledge and skills in diverse contexts
8. APPLICATION OF KNOWLEDGE & SKILL Be responsible and accountable for own learning and professional practice and in collaboration with others within broad parameters
KNOWLEDGE Develop an understanding and appreciation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and culture in contemporary and historical context using the respectful and appropriate protocols and terminology
APPLICATION OF KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS Engage in reflective self-evaluation of own cultural values and perspectives to proactively create an inclusive workplace that affirms and celebrates cultural diversity
APPLICATION OF KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS Display leadership by creating inclusive work environments and work with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in a culturally respectful manner
Geography Learning Outcomes
  • 1. Knowledge Graduates of the Bachelor of Laws will demonstrate an understanding of a coherent body of knowledge that includes: (a) the fundamental areas of legal knowledge, the Australian legal system, and underlying principles and concepts, including international and comparative contexts, (b) the broader contexts within which legal issues arise, and (c) the principles and values of justice and of ethical practice in lawyers’ roles.
  • 2. Ethics and Professional Responsibility Graduates of the Bachelor of Laws will demonstrate: (a) an understanding of approaches to ethical decision-making, (b) an ability to recognise and reflect upon, and a developing ability to respond to, ethical issues likely to arise in professional contexts, (c) an ability to recognise and reflect upon the professional responsibilities of lawyers in promoting justice and in service to the community, and (d) a developing ability to exercise professional judgement.
  • 3. Thinking skills Graduates of the Bachelor of Laws will be able to: (a) identify and articulate legal issues, (b) apply legal reasoning and research to generate appropriate responses to legal issues, (c) engage in critical analysis and make a reasoned choice amongst alternatives, and (d) think creatively in approaching legal issues and generating appropriate responses.
  • 4. Research Skills Graduates of the Bachelor of Laws will demonstrate the intellectual and practical skills needed to identify, research, evaluate and synthesise relevant factual, legal and policy issues.
  • 5. Communication and Collaboration Graduates of the Bachelor of Laws will be able to: (a) communicate in ways that are effective, appropriate and persuasive for legal and non-legal audiences, and (b) collaborate effectively.
  • 6. Self-management Graduates of the Bachelor of Laws will be able to: (a) learn and work independently, and (b) reflect on and assess their own capabilities and performance, and make use of feedback as appropriate, to support personal and professional development.
  • 7. Technology and innovation. Graduates of the Bachelor of Laws will be able to: (a) evaluate the impact of technology and innovation principles on fundamental areas of legal knowledge and legal practice, such as blockchain, AI and automation, (b) critically analyse the legal and policy frameworks governing technology, including AI, automation and disruptive technologies, (c) explore the ethical implications of technology, including governance issues, privacy risk and data integrity, and (d) examine the potential for technology, innovation principles and the law to create or contribute to positive social change.
  • 8. Cultural competence and First Nations Peoples' perspectives. Graduates of the Bachelor of Laws will be able to: (a) respect cultural diversity, debate, and operate with ideas and actions from different cultural perspectives, (b) understand First Nations Peoples’ culture and legal traditions and critically evaluate the impact of Western systems of law, regulation and governance from the perspective of First Nations Peoples' cultures, (c) engage in reflective self-evaluation of personal cultural values and perspectives, and (d) evaluate the impact of cultural differences and language proficiency on a lawyer's ability to act on behalf of a client or stakeholder.
  • 9. Apply critical and analytical thinking in order to explain a coherent body of disciplinary knowledge
  • 10. Identify discipline relevant problems, evaluate possible solutions, adapt and apply the knowledge gained
  • 11. Develop and demonstrate research skills appropriate to the arts discipline
  • 12. Learn and work independently and collaboratively with academic integrity
  • 13. Identify and respond to ethical issues in a range of contexts
  • 14. Communicate cogent arguments and/or research results in appropriate oral and written formats.
  Course Learning Outcomes
Australian Qualifications Framework Descriptors 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14
1. KNOWLEDGE Have a broad and coherent body of knowledge, with depth in the underlying principles and concepts in one or more disciplines as a basis for independent lifelong learning
2. SKILLS Have cognitive skills to review critically, analyse, consolidate and synthesise knowledge
3. SKILLS Have cognitive and technical skills to demonstrate a broad understanding of knowledge with depth in some areas
4. SKILLS Have cognitive and creative skills to exercise critical thinking and judgement in identifying and solving problems with intellectual independence
5. SKILLS Have communication skills to present a clear, coherent and independent exposition of knowledge and ideas
6. APPLICATION OF KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS Demonstrate initiative and judgement in planning, problem solving and decision making in professional practice and/or scholarship
7. APPLICATION OF KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS Adapt knowledge and skills in diverse contexts
8. APPLICATION OF KNOWLEDGE & SKILL Be responsible and accountable for own learning and professional practice and in collaboration with others within broad parameters
KNOWLEDGE Develop an understanding and appreciation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and culture in contemporary and historical context using the respectful and appropriate protocols and terminology
APPLICATION OF KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS Engage in reflective self-evaluation of own cultural values and perspectives to proactively create an inclusive workplace that affirms and celebrates cultural diversity
APPLICATION OF KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS Display leadership by creating inclusive work environments and work with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in a culturally respectful manner
History and Politics Learning Outcomes
  • 1. Knowledge Graduates of the Bachelor of Laws will demonstrate an understanding of a coherent body of knowledge that includes: (a) the fundamental areas of legal knowledge, the Australian legal system, and underlying principles and concepts, including international and comparative contexts, (b) the broader contexts within which legal issues arise, and (c) the principles and values of justice and of ethical practice in lawyers’ roles.
  • 2. Ethics and Professional Responsibility Graduates of the Bachelor of Laws will demonstrate: (a) an understanding of approaches to ethical decision-making, (b) an ability to recognise and reflect upon, and a developing ability to respond to, ethical issues likely to arise in professional contexts, (c) an ability to recognise and reflect upon the professional responsibilities of lawyers in promoting justice and in service to the community, and (d) a developing ability to exercise professional judgement.
  • 3. Thinking skills Graduates of the Bachelor of Laws will be able to: (a) identify and articulate legal issues, (b) apply legal reasoning and research to generate appropriate responses to legal issues, (c) engage in critical analysis and make a reasoned choice amongst alternatives, and (d) think creatively in approaching legal issues and generating appropriate responses.
  • 4. Research Skills Graduates of the Bachelor of Laws will demonstrate the intellectual and practical skills needed to identify, research, evaluate and synthesise relevant factual, legal and policy issues.
  • 5. Communication and Collaboration Graduates of the Bachelor of Laws will be able to: (a) communicate in ways that are effective, appropriate and persuasive for legal and non-legal audiences, and (b) collaborate effectively.
  • 6. Self-management Graduates of the Bachelor of Laws will be able to: (a) learn and work independently, and (b) reflect on and assess their own capabilities and performance, and make use of feedback as appropriate, to support personal and professional development.
  • 7. Technology and innovation. Graduates of the Bachelor of Laws will be able to: (a) evaluate the impact of technology and innovation principles on fundamental areas of legal knowledge and legal practice, such as blockchain, AI and automation, (b) critically analyse the legal and policy frameworks governing technology, including AI, automation and disruptive technologies, (c) explore the ethical implications of technology, including governance issues, privacy risk and data integrity, and (d) examine the potential for technology, innovation principles and the law to create or contribute to positive social change.
  • 8. Cultural competence and First Nations Peoples' perspectives. Graduates of the Bachelor of Laws will be able to: (a) respect cultural diversity, debate, and operate with ideas and actions from different cultural perspectives, (b) understand First Nations Peoples’ culture and legal traditions and critically evaluate the impact of Western systems of law, regulation and governance from the perspective of First Nations Peoples' cultures, (c) engage in reflective self-evaluation of personal cultural values and perspectives, and (d) evaluate the impact of cultural differences and language proficiency on a lawyer's ability to act on behalf of a client or stakeholder.
  • 9. Apply critical and analytical thinking in order to explain a coherent body of disciplinary knowledge
  • 10. Apply critical and analytical thinking in order to explain a coherent body of disciplinary knowledge
  • 11. Develop and demonstrate research skills appropriate to the arts discipline
  • 12. Learn and work independently and collaboratively with academic integrity
  • 13. Communicate cogent arguments and/or research results in appropriate oral and written formats
  • 14. Identify and respond to ethical issues in a range of contexts.
  Course Learning Outcomes
Australian Qualifications Framework Descriptors 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14
1. KNOWLEDGE Have a broad and coherent body of knowledge, with depth in the underlying principles and concepts in one or more disciplines as a basis for independent lifelong learning
2. SKILLS Have cognitive skills to review critically, analyse, consolidate and synthesise knowledge
3. SKILLS Have cognitive and technical skills to demonstrate a broad understanding of knowledge with depth in some areas
4. SKILLS Have cognitive and creative skills to exercise critical thinking and judgement in identifying and solving problems with intellectual independence
5. SKILLS Have communication skills to present a clear, coherent and independent exposition of knowledge and ideas
6. APPLICATION OF KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS Demonstrate initiative and judgement in planning, problem solving and decision making in professional practice and/or scholarship
7. APPLICATION OF KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS Adapt knowledge and skills in diverse contexts
8. APPLICATION OF KNOWLEDGE & SKILL Be responsible and accountable for own learning and professional practice and in collaboration with others within broad parameters
KNOWLEDGE Develop an understanding and appreciation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and culture in contemporary and historical context using the respectful and appropriate protocols and terminology
APPLICATION OF KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS Engage in reflective self-evaluation of own cultural values and perspectives to proactively create an inclusive workplace that affirms and celebrates cultural diversity
APPLICATION OF KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS Display leadership by creating inclusive work environments and work with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in a culturally respectful manner
Journalism Learning Outcomes
  • 1. Knowledge Graduates of the Bachelor of Laws will demonstrate an understanding of a coherent body of knowledge that includes: (a) the fundamental areas of legal knowledge, the Australian legal system, and underlying principles and concepts, including international and comparative contexts, (b) the broader contexts within which legal issues arise, and (c) the principles and values of justice and of ethical practice in lawyers’ roles.
  • 2. Ethics and Professional Responsibility Graduates of the Bachelor of Laws will demonstrate: (a) an understanding of approaches to ethical decision-making, (b) an ability to recognise and reflect upon, and a developing ability to respond to, ethical issues likely to arise in professional contexts, (c) an ability to recognise and reflect upon the professional responsibilities of lawyers in promoting justice and in service to the community, and (d) a developing ability to exercise professional judgement.
  • 3. Thinking skills Graduates of the Bachelor of Laws will be able to: (a) identify and articulate legal issues, (b) apply legal reasoning and research to generate appropriate responses to legal issues, (c) engage in critical analysis and make a reasoned choice amongst alternatives, and (d) think creatively in approaching legal issues and generating appropriate responses.
  • 4. Research Skills Graduates of the Bachelor of Laws will demonstrate the intellectual and practical skills needed to identify, research, evaluate and synthesise relevant factual, legal and policy issues.
  • 5. Communication and Collaboration Graduates of the Bachelor of Laws will be able to: (a) communicate in ways that are effective, appropriate and persuasive for legal and non-legal audiences, and (b) collaborate effectively.
  • 6. Self-management Graduates of the Bachelor of Laws will be able to: (a) learn and work independently, and (b) reflect on and assess their own capabilities and performance, and make use of feedback as appropriate, to support personal and professional development.
  • 7. Technology and innovation. Graduates of the Bachelor of Laws will be able to: (a) evaluate the impact of technology and innovation principles on fundamental areas of legal knowledge and legal practice, such as blockchain, AI and automation, (b) critically analyse the legal and policy frameworks governing technology, including AI, automation and disruptive technologies, (c) explore the ethical implications of technology, including governance issues, privacy risk and data integrity, and (d) examine the potential for technology, innovation principles and the law to create or contribute to positive social change.
  • 8. Cultural competence and First Nations Peoples' perspectives. Graduates of the Bachelor of Laws will be able to: (a) respect cultural diversity, debate, and operate with ideas and actions from different cultural perspectives, (b) understand First Nations Peoples’ culture and legal traditions and critically evaluate the impact of Western systems of law, regulation and governance from the perspective of First Nations Peoples' cultures, (c) engage in reflective self-evaluation of personal cultural values and perspectives, and (d) evaluate the impact of cultural differences and language proficiency on a lawyer's ability to act on behalf of a client or stakeholder.
  • 9. Apply critical and analytical thinking in order to explain a coherent body of disciplinary knowledge
  • 10. Identify discipline relevant problems, evaluate possible solutions, adapt and apply the knowledge gained
  • 11. Develop and demonstrate research skills appropriate to the arts discipline
  • 12. Learn and work independently and collaboratively with academic integrity
  • 13. Identify and respond to ethical issues in a range of contexts
  • 14. Communicate cogent arguments and/or research results in appropriate oral and written formats.
  Course Learning Outcomes
Australian Qualifications Framework Descriptors 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14
1. KNOWLEDGE Have a broad and coherent body of knowledge, with depth in the underlying principles and concepts in one or more disciplines as a basis for independent lifelong learning
2. SKILLS Have cognitive skills to review critically, analyse, consolidate and synthesise knowledge
3. SKILLS Have cognitive and technical skills to demonstrate a broad understanding of knowledge with depth in some areas
4. SKILLS Have cognitive and creative skills to exercise critical thinking and judgement in identifying and solving problems with intellectual independence
5. SKILLS Have communication skills to present a clear, coherent and independent exposition of knowledge and ideas
6. APPLICATION OF KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS Demonstrate initiative and judgement in planning, problem solving and decision making in professional practice and/or scholarship
7. APPLICATION OF KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS Adapt knowledge and skills in diverse contexts
8. APPLICATION OF KNOWLEDGE & SKILL Be responsible and accountable for own learning and professional practice and in collaboration with others within broad parameters
KNOWLEDGE Develop an understanding and appreciation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and culture in contemporary and historical context using the respectful and appropriate protocols and terminology
APPLICATION OF KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS Engage in reflective self-evaluation of own cultural values and perspectives to proactively create an inclusive workplace that affirms and celebrates cultural diversity
APPLICATION OF KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS Display leadership by creating inclusive work environments and work with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in a culturally respectful manner
Liberal Arts Learning Outcomes
  • 1. Knowledge Graduates of the Bachelor of Laws will demonstrate an understanding of a coherent body of knowledge that includes: (a) the fundamental areas of legal knowledge, the Australian legal system, and underlying principles and concepts, including international and comparative contexts, (b) the broader contexts within which legal issues arise, and (c) the principles and values of justice and of ethical practice in lawyers’ roles.
  • 2. Ethics and Professional Responsibility Graduates of the Bachelor of Laws will demonstrate: (a) an understanding of approaches to ethical decision-making, (b) an ability to recognise and reflect upon, and a developing ability to respond to, ethical issues likely to arise in professional contexts, (c) an ability to recognise and reflect upon the professional responsibilities of lawyers in promoting justice and in service to the community, and (d) a developing ability to exercise professional judgement.
  • 3. Thinking skills Graduates of the Bachelor of Laws will be able to: (a) identify and articulate legal issues, (b) apply legal reasoning and research to generate appropriate responses to legal issues, (c) engage in critical analysis and make a reasoned choice amongst alternatives, and (d) think creatively in approaching legal issues and generating appropriate responses.
  • 4. Research Skills Graduates of the Bachelor of Laws will demonstrate the intellectual and practical skills needed to identify, research, evaluate and synthesise relevant factual, legal and policy issues.
  • 5. Communication and Collaboration Graduates of the Bachelor of Laws will be able to: (a) communicate in ways that are effective, appropriate and persuasive for legal and non-legal audiences, and (b) collaborate effectively.
  • 6. Self-management Graduates of the Bachelor of Laws will be able to: (a) learn and work independently, and (b) reflect on and assess their own capabilities and performance, and make use of feedback as appropriate, to support personal and professional development.
  • 7. Technology and innovation. Graduates of the Bachelor of Laws will be able to: (a) evaluate the impact of technology and innovation principles on fundamental areas of legal knowledge and legal practice, such as blockchain, AI and automation, (b) critically analyse the legal and policy frameworks governing technology, including AI, automation and disruptive technologies, (c) explore the ethical implications of technology, including governance issues, privacy risk and data integrity, and (d) examine the potential for technology, innovation principles and the law to create or contribute to positive social change.
  • 8. Cultural competence and First Nations Peoples' perspectives. Graduates of the Bachelor of Laws will be able to: (a) respect cultural diversity, debate, and operate with ideas and actions from different cultural perspectives, (b) understand First Nations Peoples’ culture and legal traditions and critically evaluate the impact of Western systems of law, regulation and governance from the perspective of First Nations Peoples' cultures, (c) engage in reflective self-evaluation of personal cultural values and perspectives, and (d) evaluate the impact of cultural differences and language proficiency on a lawyer's ability to act on behalf of a client or stakeholder.
  • 9. Analyse and explain a coherent body of disciplinary knowledge (depending on the majors selected in the BA), in cogent arguments and from selected disciplinary perspectives, the way that humans recognise, record and debate human practices, meanings and values
  • 10. Identify discipline relevant problems, analyse and critically and assess the critical debates surrounding them, evaluate possible solutions, adapt the knowledge gained, and apply this to relevant and/or contemporary issues
  • 11. Research, find, retrieve, sort, test and deploy evidence, data and information effectively
  • 12. Learn and work independently and collaboratively and reflect upon feedback to identify and enact self improvements
  • 13. Identify and respond to ethical issues in a range of contexts
  • 14. Communicate cogent arguments and/ or research result in appropriate oral and written formats and media.
  Course Learning Outcomes
Australian Qualifications Framework Descriptors 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14
1. KNOWLEDGE Have a broad and coherent body of knowledge, with depth in the underlying principles and concepts in one or more disciplines as a basis for independent lifelong learning
2. SKILLS Have cognitive skills to review critically, analyse, consolidate and synthesise knowledge
3. SKILLS Have cognitive and technical skills to demonstrate a broad understanding of knowledge with depth in some areas
4. SKILLS Have cognitive and creative skills to exercise critical thinking and judgement in identifying and solving problems with intellectual independence
5. SKILLS Have communication skills to present a clear, coherent and independent exposition of knowledge and ideas
6. APPLICATION OF KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS Demonstrate initiative and judgement in planning, problem solving and decision making in professional practice and/or scholarship
7. APPLICATION OF KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS Adapt knowledge and skills in diverse contexts
8. APPLICATION OF KNOWLEDGE & SKILL Be responsible and accountable for own learning and professional practice and in collaboration with others within broad parameters
KNOWLEDGE Develop an understanding and appreciation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and culture in contemporary and historical context using the respectful and appropriate protocols and terminology
APPLICATION OF KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS Engage in reflective self-evaluation of own cultural values and perspectives to proactively create an inclusive workplace that affirms and celebrates cultural diversity
APPLICATION OF KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS Display leadership by creating inclusive work environments and work with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in a culturally respectful manner
Pathway to Teaching (Early Childhood) Learning Outcomes
  • 1. Knowledge. Graduates of the Bachelor of Laws will demonstrate an understanding of a coherent body of knowledge that includes: (a) the fundamental areas of legal knowledge (including those expressed in the Priestley 11 and Statutory Interpretation), the Australian legal system, and underlying principles and concepts, including international and comparative contexts, (b) the broader contexts within which legal issues arise, and (c) the principles and values of justice and of ethical practice in lawyers’ roles.
  • 2. Ethics and professional responsibility. Graduates of the Bachelor of Laws will demonstrate: (a) an understanding of approaches to ethical decision-making, (b) an ability to recognise and reflect upon, and a developing ability to respond to, ethical issues likely to arise in professional contexts, (c) an ability to recognise and reflect upon the professional responsibilities of lawyers in promoting justice and in service to the community, and (d) a developing ability to exercise professional judgement.
  • 3. Thinking skills. Graduates of the Bachelor of Laws will be able to: (a) identify and articulate legal issues, (b) apply legal reasoning and research to generate appropriate responses to legal issues, (c) engage in critical analysis and make a reasoned choice amongst alternatives, and (d) think creatively in approaching legal issues and generating appropriate responses.
  • 4. Research skills. Graduates of the Bachelor of Laws will demonstrate the intellectual and practical skills needed to identify, research, evaluate and synthesise relevant factual, legal and policy issues.
  • 5. Communication and collaboration. Graduates of the Bachelor of Laws will be able to: (a) communicate in ways that are effective, appropriate and persuasive for legal and non-legal audiences, and (b) collaborate effectively.
  • 6. Self-management. Graduates of the Bachelor of Laws will be able to: (a) learn and work independently, and (b) reflect on and assess their own capabilities and performance, and make use of feedback as appropriate, to support personal and professional development.
  • 7. Technology and innovation. Graduates of the Bachelor of Laws will be able to: (a) evaluate the impact of technology and innovation principles on fundamental areas of legal knowledge and legal practice, such as blockchain, AI and automation, (b) critically analyse the legal and policy frameworks governing technology, including AI, automation and disruptive technologies, (c) explore the ethical implications of technology, including governance issues, privacy risk and data integrity, and (d) examine the potential for technology, innovation principles and the law to create or contribute to positive social change.
  • 8. Cultural competence and First Nations Peoples' perspectives. Graduates of the Bachelor of Laws will be able to: (a) respect cultural diversity, debate, and operate with ideas and actions from different cultural perspectives, (b) understand First Nations Peoples’ culture and legal traditions and critically evaluate the impact of Western systems of law, regulation and governance from the perspective of First Nations Peoples' cultures, (c) engage in reflective self-evaluation of personal cultural values and perspectives, and (d) evaluate the impact of cultural differences and language proficiency on a lawyer's ability to act on behalf of a client or stakeholder.
  • 9. Apply critical and analytical thinking in order to explain a coherent body of disciplinary knowledge
  • 10. Identify discipline relevant problems, evaluate possible solutions, adapt and apply the knowledge gained
  • 11. Demonstrate research skills appropriate to the arts discipline
  • 12. Learn and work independently and collaboratively with academic integrity
  • 13. Identify and respond to ethical issues in a range of contexts
  • 14. Communicate cogent arguments and/or research results in appropriate oral and written formats
  Course Learning Outcomes
Australian Qualifications Framework Descriptors 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14
1. KNOWLEDGE Have a broad and coherent body of knowledge, with depth in the underlying principles and concepts in one or more disciplines as a basis for independent lifelong learning
2. SKILLS Have cognitive skills to review critically, analyse, consolidate and synthesise knowledge
3. SKILLS Have cognitive and technical skills to demonstrate a broad understanding of knowledge with depth in some areas
4. SKILLS Have cognitive and creative skills to exercise critical thinking and judgement in identifying and solving problems with intellectual independence
5. SKILLS Have communication skills to present a clear, coherent and independent exposition of knowledge and ideas
6. APPLICATION OF KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS Demonstrate initiative and judgement in planning, problem solving and decision making in professional practice and/or scholarship
7. APPLICATION OF KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS Adapt knowledge and skills in diverse contexts
8. APPLICATION OF KNOWLEDGE & SKILL Be responsible and accountable for own learning and professional practice and in collaboration with others within broad parameters
KNOWLEDGE Develop an understanding and appreciation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and culture in contemporary and historical context using the respectful and appropriate protocols and terminology
APPLICATION OF KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS Engage in reflective self-evaluation of own cultural values and perspectives to proactively create an inclusive workplace that affirms and celebrates cultural diversity
APPLICATION OF KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS Display leadership by creating inclusive work environments and work with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in a culturally respectful manner
Pathway to Teaching (Primary) Learning Outcomes
  • 1. Knowledge. Graduates of the Bachelor of Laws will demonstrate an understanding of a coherent body of knowledge that includes: (a) the fundamental areas of legal knowledge (including those expressed in the Priestley 11 and Statutory Interpretation), the Australian legal system, and underlying principles and concepts, including international and comparative contexts, (b) the broader contexts within which legal issues arise, and (c) the principles and values of justice and of ethical practice in lawyers’ roles.
  • 2. Ethics and professional responsibility. Graduates of the Bachelor of Laws will demonstrate: (a) an understanding of approaches to ethical decision-making, (b) an ability to recognise and reflect upon, and a developing ability to respond to, ethical issues likely to arise in professional contexts, (c) an ability to recognise and reflect upon the professional responsibilities of lawyers in promoting justice and in service to the community, and (d) a developing ability to exercise professional judgement.
  • 3. Thinking skills. Graduates of the Bachelor of Laws will be able to: (a) identify and articulate legal issues, (b) apply legal reasoning and research to generate appropriate responses to legal issues, (c) engage in critical analysis and make a reasoned choice amongst alternatives, and (d) think creatively in approaching legal issues and generating appropriate responses.
  • 4. Research skills. Graduates of the Bachelor of Laws will demonstrate the intellectual and practical skills needed to identify, research, evaluate and synthesise relevant factual, legal and policy issues.
  • 5. Communication and collaboration. Graduates of the Bachelor of Laws will be able to: (a) communicate in ways that are effective, appropriate and persuasive for legal and non-legal audiences, and (b) collaborate effectively.
  • 6. Self-management. Graduates of the Bachelor of Laws will be able to: (a) learn and work independently, and (b) reflect on and assess their own capabilities and performance, and make use of feedback as appropriate, to support personal and professional development.
  • 7. Technology and innovation. Graduates of the Bachelor of Laws will be able to: (a) evaluate the impact of technology and innovation principles on fundamental areas of legal knowledge and legal practice, such as blockchain, AI and automation, (b) critically analyse the legal and policy frameworks governing technology, including AI, automation and disruptive technologies, (c) explore the ethical implications of technology, including governance issues, privacy risk and data integrity, and (d) examine the potential for technology, innovation principles and the law to create or contribute to positive social change.
  • 8. Cultural competence and First Nations Peoples' perspectives. Graduates of the Bachelor of Laws will be able to: (a) respect cultural diversity, debate, and operate with ideas and actions from different cultural perspectives, (b) understand First Nations Peoples’ culture and legal traditions and critically evaluate the impact of Western systems of law, regulation and governance from the perspective of First Nations Peoples' cultures, (c) engage in reflective self-evaluation of personal cultural values and perspectives, and (d) evaluate the impact of cultural differences and language proficiency on a lawyer's ability to act on behalf of a client or stakeholder.
  • 9. Apply critical and analytical thinking in order to explain a coherent body of disciplinary knowledge
  • 10. Identify discipline relevant problems, evaluate possible solutions, adapt and apply the knowledge gained
  • 11. Demonstrate research skills appropriate to the arts discipline
  • 12. Learn and work independently and collaboratively with academic integrity
  • 13. Identify and respond to ethical issues in a range of contexts
  • 14. Communicate cogent arguments and/or research results in appropriate oral and written formats
  Course Learning Outcomes
Australian Qualifications Framework Descriptors 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14
1. KNOWLEDGE Have a broad and coherent body of knowledge, with depth in the underlying principles and concepts in one or more disciplines as a basis for independent lifelong learning
2. SKILLS Have cognitive skills to review critically, analyse, consolidate and synthesise knowledge
3. SKILLS Have cognitive and technical skills to demonstrate a broad understanding of knowledge with depth in some areas
4. SKILLS Have cognitive and creative skills to exercise critical thinking and judgement in identifying and solving problems with intellectual independence
5. SKILLS Have communication skills to present a clear, coherent and independent exposition of knowledge and ideas
6. APPLICATION OF KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS Demonstrate initiative and judgement in planning, problem solving and decision making in professional practice and/or scholarship
7. APPLICATION OF KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS Adapt knowledge and skills in diverse contexts
8. APPLICATION OF KNOWLEDGE & SKILL Be responsible and accountable for own learning and professional practice and in collaboration with others within broad parameters
KNOWLEDGE Develop an understanding and appreciation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and culture in contemporary and historical context using the respectful and appropriate protocols and terminology
APPLICATION OF KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS Engage in reflective self-evaluation of own cultural values and perspectives to proactively create an inclusive workplace that affirms and celebrates cultural diversity
APPLICATION OF KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS Display leadership by creating inclusive work environments and work with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in a culturally respectful manner
Public Relations Learning Outcomes
  • 1. Knowledge Graduates of the Bachelor of Laws will demonstrate an understanding of a coherent body of knowledge that includes: (a) the fundamental areas of legal knowledge, the Australian legal system, and underlying principles and concepts, including international and comparative contexts, (b) the broader contexts within which legal issues arise, and (c) the principles and values of justice and of ethical practice in lawyers’ roles.
  • 2. Ethics and Professional Responsibility Graduates of the Bachelor of Laws will demonstrate: (a) an understanding of approaches to ethical decision-making, (b) an ability to recognise and reflect upon, and a developing ability to respond to, ethical issues likely to arise in professional contexts, (c) an ability to recognise and reflect upon the professional responsibilities of lawyers in promoting justice and in service to the community, and (d) a developing ability to exercise professional judgement.
  • 3. Thinking skills Graduates of the Bachelor of Laws will be able to: (a) identify and articulate legal issues, (b) apply legal reasoning and research to generate appropriate responses to legal issues, (c) engage in critical analysis and make a reasoned choice amongst alternatives, and (d) think creatively in approaching legal issues and generating appropriate responses.
  • 4. Research Skills Graduates of the Bachelor of Laws will demonstrate the intellectual and practical skills needed to identify, research, evaluate and synthesise relevant factual, legal and policy issues.
  • 5. Communication and Collaboration Graduates of the Bachelor of Laws will be able to: (a) communicate in ways that are effective, appropriate and persuasive for legal and non-legal audiences, and (b) collaborate effectively.
  • 6. Self-management Graduates of the Bachelor of Laws will be able to: (a) learn and work independently, and (b) reflect on and assess their own capabilities and performance, and make use of feedback as appropriate, to support personal and professional development.
  • 7. Technology and innovation. Graduates of the Bachelor of Laws will be able to: (a) evaluate the impact of technology and innovation principles on fundamental areas of legal knowledge and legal practice, such as blockchain, AI and automation, (b) critically analyse the legal and policy frameworks governing technology, including AI, automation and disruptive technologies, (c) explore the ethical implications of technology, including governance issues, privacy risk and data integrity, and (d) examine the potential for technology, innovation principles and the law to create or contribute to positive social change.
  • 8. Cultural competence and First Nations Peoples' perspectives. Graduates of the Bachelor of Laws will be able to: (a) respect cultural diversity, debate, and operate with ideas and actions from different cultural perspectives, (b) understand First Nations Peoples’ culture and legal traditions and critically evaluate the impact of Western systems of law, regulation and governance from the perspective of First Nations Peoples' cultures, (c) engage in reflective self-evaluation of personal cultural values and perspectives, and (d) evaluate the impact of cultural differences and language proficiency on a lawyer's ability to act on behalf of a client or stakeholder.
  • 9. Apply critical and analytical thinking in order to explain a coherent body of disciplinary knowledge
  • 10. Identify discipline relevant problems, evaluate possible solutions, adapt and apply the knowledge gained
  • 11. Develop and demonstrate research skills appropriate to the arts discipline
  • 12. Learn and work independently and collaboratively with academic integrity
  • 13. Identify and respond to ethical issues in a range of contexts
  • 14. Communicate cogent arguments and/or research results in appropriate oral and written formats.
  Course Learning Outcomes
Australian Qualifications Framework Descriptors 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14
1. KNOWLEDGE Have a broad and coherent body of knowledge, with depth in the underlying principles and concepts in one or more disciplines as a basis for independent lifelong learning
2. SKILLS Have cognitive skills to review critically, analyse, consolidate and synthesise knowledge
3. SKILLS Have cognitive and technical skills to demonstrate a broad understanding of knowledge with depth in some areas
4. SKILLS Have cognitive and creative skills to exercise critical thinking and judgement in identifying and solving problems with intellectual independence
5. SKILLS Have communication skills to present a clear, coherent and independent exposition of knowledge and ideas
6. APPLICATION OF KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS Demonstrate initiative and judgement in planning, problem solving and decision making in professional practice and/or scholarship
7. APPLICATION OF KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS Adapt knowledge and skills in diverse contexts
8. APPLICATION OF KNOWLEDGE & SKILL Be responsible and accountable for own learning and professional practice and in collaboration with others within broad parameters
KNOWLEDGE Develop an understanding and appreciation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and culture in contemporary and historical context using the respectful and appropriate protocols and terminology
APPLICATION OF KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS Engage in reflective self-evaluation of own cultural values and perspectives to proactively create an inclusive workplace that affirms and celebrates cultural diversity
APPLICATION OF KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS Display leadership by creating inclusive work environments and work with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in a culturally respectful manner
Theatre Studies Learning Outcomes
  • 1. Knowledge Graduates of the Bachelor of Laws will demonstrate an understanding of a coherent body of knowledge that includes: (a) the fundamental areas of legal knowledge, the Australian legal system, and underlying principles and concepts, including international and comparative contexts, (b) the broader contexts within which legal issues arise, and (c) the principles and values of justice and of ethical practice in lawyers’ roles.
  • 2. Ethics and Professional Responsibility Graduates of the Bachelor of Laws will demonstrate: (a) an understanding of approaches to ethical decision-making, (b) an ability to recognise and reflect upon, and a developing ability to respond to, ethical issues likely to arise in professional contexts, (c) an ability to recognise and reflect upon the professional responsibilities of lawyers in promoting justice and in service to the community, and (d) a developing ability to exercise professional judgement.
  • 3. Thinking skills Graduates of the Bachelor of Laws will be able to: (a) identify and articulate legal issues, (b) apply legal reasoning and research to generate appropriate responses to legal issues, (c) engage in critical analysis and make a reasoned choice amongst alternatives, and (d) think creatively in approaching legal issues and generating appropriate responses.
  • 4. Research Skills Graduates of the Bachelor of Laws will demonstrate the intellectual and practical skills needed to identify, research, evaluate and synthesise relevant factual, legal and policy issues.
  • 5. Communication and Collaboration Graduates of the Bachelor of Laws will be able to: (a) communicate in ways that are effective, appropriate and persuasive for legal and non-legal audiences, and (b) collaborate effectively.
  • 6. Self-management Graduates of the Bachelor of Laws will be able to: (a) learn and work independently, and (b) reflect on and assess their own capabilities and performance, and make use of feedback as appropriate, to support personal and professional development.
  • 7. Technology and innovation. Graduates of the Bachelor of Laws will be able to: (a) evaluate the impact of technology and innovation principles on fundamental areas of legal knowledge and legal practice, such as blockchain, AI and automation, (b) critically analyse the legal and policy frameworks governing technology, including AI, automation and disruptive technologies, (c) explore the ethical implications of technology, including governance issues, privacy risk and data integrity, and (d) examine the potential for technology, innovation principles and the law to create or contribute to positive social change.
  • 8. Cultural competence and First Nations Peoples' perspectives. Graduates of the Bachelor of Laws will be able to: (a) respect cultural diversity, debate, and operate with ideas and actions from different cultural perspectives, (b) understand First Nations Peoples’ culture and legal traditions and critically evaluate the impact of Western systems of law, regulation and governance from the perspective of First Nations Peoples' cultures, (c) engage in reflective self-evaluation of personal cultural values and perspectives, and (d) evaluate the impact of cultural differences and language proficiency on a lawyer's ability to act on behalf of a client or stakeholder.
  • 9. Apply critical and analytical thinking in order to explain a coherent body of disciplinary knowledge
  • 10. Identify discipline relevant problems, evaluate possible solutions, adapt and apply the knowledge gained
  • 11. Develop and demonstrate research skills appropriate to the arts discipline
  • 12. Learn and work independently and collaboratively with academic integrity
  • 13. Identify and respond to ethical issues in a range of contexts
  • 14. Communicate cogent arguments and/or research results in appropriate oral and written formats.
  Course Learning Outcomes
Australian Qualifications Framework Descriptors 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14
1. KNOWLEDGE Have a broad and coherent body of knowledge, with depth in the underlying principles and concepts in one or more disciplines as a basis for independent lifelong learning
2. SKILLS Have cognitive skills to review critically, analyse, consolidate and synthesise knowledge
3. SKILLS Have cognitive and technical skills to demonstrate a broad understanding of knowledge with depth in some areas
4. SKILLS Have cognitive and creative skills to exercise critical thinking and judgement in identifying and solving problems with intellectual independence
5. SKILLS Have communication skills to present a clear, coherent and independent exposition of knowledge and ideas
6. APPLICATION OF KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS Demonstrate initiative and judgement in planning, problem solving and decision making in professional practice and/or scholarship
7. APPLICATION OF KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS Adapt knowledge and skills in diverse contexts
8. APPLICATION OF KNOWLEDGE & SKILL Be responsible and accountable for own learning and professional practice and in collaboration with others within broad parameters
KNOWLEDGE Develop an understanding and appreciation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and culture in contemporary and historical context using the respectful and appropriate protocols and terminology
APPLICATION OF KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS Engage in reflective self-evaluation of own cultural values and perspectives to proactively create an inclusive workplace that affirms and celebrates cultural diversity
APPLICATION OF KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS Display leadership by creating inclusive work environments and work with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in a culturally respectful manner
Visual Arts Learning Outcomes
  • 1. Knowledge Graduates of the Bachelor of Laws will demonstrate an understanding of a coherent body of knowledge that includes: (a) the fundamental areas of legal knowledge, the Australian legal system, and underlying principles and concepts, including international and comparative contexts, (b) the broader contexts within which legal issues arise, and ( c) the principles and values of justice and of ethical practice in lawyers’ roles.
  • 2. Ethics and Professional Responsibility Graduates of the Bachelor of Laws will demonstrate: (a) an understanding of approaches to ethical decision-making, (b) an ability to recognise and reflect upon, and a developing ability to respond to, ethical issues likely to arise in professional contexts, (c) an ability to recognise and reflect upon the professional responsibilities of lawyers in promoting justice and in service to the community, and (d) a developing ability to exercise professional judgement.
  • 3. Thinking skills Graduates of the Bachelor of Laws will be able to: (a) identify and articulate legal issues, (b) apply legal reasoning and research to generate appropriate responses to legal issues, (c) engage in critical analysis and make a reasoned choice amongst alternatives, and (d) think creatively in approaching legal issues and generating appropriate responses.
  • 4. Research Skills Graduates of the Bachelor of Laws will demonstrate the intellectual and practical skills needed to identify, research, evaluate and synthesise relevant factual, legal and policy issues.
  • 5. Communication and Collaboration Graduates of the Bachelor of Laws will be able to: (a) communicate in ways that are effective, appropriate and persuasive for legal and non-legal audiences, and (b) collaborate effectively.
  • 6. Self-management Graduates of the Bachelor of Laws will be able to: (a) learn and work independently, and (b) reflect on and assess their own capabilities and performance, and make use of feedback as appropriate, to support personal and professional development.
  • 7. Technology and innovation. Graduates of the Bachelor of Laws will be able to: (a) evaluate the impact of technology and innovation principles on fundamental areas of legal knowledge and legal practice, such as blockchain, AI and automation, (b) critically analyse the legal and policy frameworks governing technology, including AI, automation and disruptive technologies, (c) explore the ethical implications of technology, including governance issues, privacy risk and data integrity, and (d) examine the potential for technology, innovation principles and the law to create or contribute to positive social change.
  • 8. Cultural competence and First Nations Peoples' perspectives. Graduates of the Bachelor of Laws will be able to: (a) respect cultural diversity, debate, and operate with ideas and actions from different cultural perspectives, (b) understand First Nations Peoples’ culture and legal traditions and critically evaluate the impact of Western systems of law, regulation and governance from the perspective of First Nations Peoples' cultures, (c) engage in reflective self-evaluation of personal cultural values and perspectives, and (d) evaluate the impact of cultural differences and language proficiency on a lawyer's ability to act on behalf of a client or stakeholder.
  • 9. Apply critical and analytical thinking in order to explain a coherent body of disciplinary knowledge
  • 10. Identify discipline relevant problems, evaluate possible solutions, adapt and apply the knowledge gained
  • 11. Develop and demonstrate research skills appropriate to the arts discipline
  • 12. Learn and work independently and collaboratively with academic integrity
  • 13. Identify and respond to ethical issues in a range of contexts
  • 14. Communicate cogent arguments and/or research results in appropriate oral and written formats.
  Course Learning Outcomes
Australian Qualifications Framework Descriptors 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14
1. KNOWLEDGE Have a broad and coherent body of knowledge, with depth in the underlying principles and concepts in one or more disciplines as a basis for independent lifelong learning
2. SKILLS Have cognitive skills to review critically, analyse, consolidate and synthesise knowledge
3. SKILLS Have cognitive and technical skills to demonstrate a broad understanding of knowledge with depth in some areas
4. SKILLS Have cognitive and creative skills to exercise critical thinking and judgement in identifying and solving problems with intellectual independence
5. SKILLS Have communication skills to present a clear, coherent and independent exposition of knowledge and ideas
6. APPLICATION OF KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS Demonstrate initiative and judgement in planning, problem solving and decision making in professional practice and/or scholarship
7. APPLICATION OF KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS Adapt knowledge and skills in diverse contexts
8. APPLICATION OF KNOWLEDGE & SKILL Be responsible and accountable for own learning and professional practice and in collaboration with others within broad parameters
KNOWLEDGE Develop an understanding and appreciation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and culture in contemporary and historical context using the respectful and appropriate protocols and terminology
APPLICATION OF KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS Engage in reflective self-evaluation of own cultural values and perspectives to proactively create an inclusive workplace that affirms and celebrates cultural diversity
APPLICATION OF KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS Display leadership by creating inclusive work environments and work with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in a culturally respectful manner
Digital Storytelling Learning Outcomes
Please refer to the Core Structure Learning Outcomes
Discovering Theatre Learning Outcomes
Please refer to the Core Structure Learning Outcomes
Environmental Management Learning Outcomes
Please refer to the Core Structure Learning Outcomes
Essential Geography Learning Outcomes
Please refer to the Core Structure Learning Outcomes
First Nations Studies Learning Outcomes
Please refer to the Core Structure Learning Outcomes
Liberal Arts Learning Outcomes
Please refer to the Core Structure Learning Outcomes
Literary Studies Learning Outcomes
Please refer to the Core Structure Learning Outcomes
Strategic Communication Learning Outcomes
Please refer to the Core Structure Learning Outcomes
Visual Art Practices Learning Outcomes
Please refer to the Core Structure Learning Outcomes
Working with the Media Learning Outcomes
Please refer to the Core Structure Learning Outcomes
World History Learning Outcomes
Please refer to the Core Structure Learning Outcomes
Writing Stories Learning Outcomes
Please refer to the Core Structure Learning Outcomes
Commercial Law 4 Learning Outcomes
Please refer to the Core Structure Learning Outcomes
Liberal Law 4 Learning Outcomes
Please refer to the Core Structure Learning Outcomes
Liberal Law 8 Learning Outcomes
Please refer to the Core Structure Learning Outcomes
Course Structure

In order to complete this course, you must:

  1. Complete the core structure
  2. Complete 2 majors
  3. Complete 1 minor
Number of units: 24 Total credit points: 144

The 40 units in the double degree are made up of 24 Law units, of which 16 law units are core, plus an additional 8 law units (one 8 pack or two 4 packs) AND 16 Arts units of which 3 Arts units are core, plus 13 units made up of an Arts major (8 units), an Arts minor (4 units) and a unit from any Arts major or Arts minor that is not already selected (provided the unit pre-requisites are met and the program of study does not exceed eight level 1 (AQF level 5) units from the 16 Arts units studied in CB94).

19 core units, consists of 16 core Law units plus three core Arts units. The remaining 21 units are made up of 8 Law units (one eight pack or two four packs) and 13 Arts (one major, one minor and one other unit).

In order to complete this course, you must:

- Complete the core structure

- Complete one Law 8 pack which can be selected from Liberal Law or Legal Practice OR two Law 4 packs which can be selected from Liberal Law, Legal Practice or Commercial Law.

- Complete one Arts major which can be selected from:

Creative Writing

English and Cultural Studies

Geography

History and Politics

Journalism

Liberal Arts

Public Relations

Theatre Studies

Visual Arts

Pathway to Teaching (Early Childhood)

Pathway to Teaching (Primary)

Complete one Arts minor which can be selected from:

First Nations Studies

Digital Storytelling

Discovering Theatre

Environmental Management

Essential Geography

Liberal Arts

Literary Studies

Strategic communication

Visual Art Practices

Working with the media

World History

Writing Stories

- Complete a unit from any Arts major or Arts minor that is not already selected (provided the unit pre-requisites are met and the program of study does not exceed eight level 1 (AQF level 5) units from the 16 Arts units studied in CB94).

Compulsory Units

Available units
Students must complete the following compulsory units:
LAWS11057 Introduction to Law
LAWS11059 Statutory Interpretation
LAWS11066 Contracts
LAWS11069 Torts
LAWS11060 Criminal Law
LAWS11065 Constitutional Law
LAWS12072 Legal Research
LAWS12073 Legal Practicum
LAWS12061 Administrative Law
LAWS12065 Foundations of Property Law
LAWS12066 Land Law
LAWS12078 Equity and Trusts
LAWS13009 Corporations Law
LAWS13010 Evidence and Proof
LAWS13013 Legal Professional Conduct
LAWS13017 Civil Procedure
COMM11108 Communicating for Social Change
BUSN13004 Professional Practice and Experience
SUST11001 The Changing World and Sustainability
Course Structure

In order to complete this course, you must:

  1. Complete the core structure
  2. Complete 2 majors
  3. Complete 1 minor

Creative Writing Major

Number of units: 6 Total credit points: 48

Do you have a passion for writing? Are you a budding poet or writer? Do you love writing short stories and poems? Our Creative Writing major offers you the chance to develop the skills and knowledge you'll need as a writer in the digital age. You will develop a tool kit of writing styles and genres, including traditional fiction, non-fiction, poetry and scriptwriting, as well as experimental and hybrid genres such as speculative fiction, flash fiction, lyric essays, docufiction, and concrete poetry, among others. This major also encourages you to explore the vast array of opportunities that technology provides the creative writer in creating 'born digital' works.

A standout feature of the Creative Writing major is that it provides you with the chance to write a sustained creative writing dissertation of any genre in your final year. This feature makes the Creative Writing major an invaluable pathway into the Master of Letters where, as a prospective Master of Letters student, you could acquire some credit.

Available units
Students must complete the following compulsory units:
WRIT11023 Beginning Creative Writing
WRIT11025 Creative Nonfiction
WRIT12010 Creative Writing: Adventures in Craft
WRIT13013 Writing Project
WRIT13014 Creative Writing Artefact
WRIT28001 Creative Writing Exegesis
Course Structure

In order to complete this course, you must:

  1. Complete the core structure
  2. Complete 2 majors
  3. Complete 1 minor

English and Cultural Studies Major

Number of units: 8 Total credit points: 48

The English and Cultural Studies major brings together two distinct but complementary disciplinary approaches: literary studies, where literature is read for its own sake and for the values it reveals in stories, poems and plays about our lived and imaginary experiences; and cultural studies, where ideas and concepts derived from a broad study of culture are explored through a variety of texts including film, media, television, advertising and the like. You will be able to demonstrate advanced reading and writing skills while applying critical thinking and advanced modes of textual analysis to a broad range of texts, genres and media. You will communicate using cogent, discipline-based and context-relevant research and participate, both self-reflexively and ethically, in discipline critical debates.

Available units
Students must complete the following compulsory units:
LITR11056 Introduction to Literature
LITR11043 The Short Story
LITR12028 Poetry and Poetics
LITR12029 Shakespeare Today
LITR13041 The Modern Novel
LITR13042 Australian Literature and Identity
LITR28002 Literary Theory
LITR28001 Comparative Literature Project
Course Structure

In order to complete this course, you must:

  1. Complete the core structure
  2. Complete 2 majors
  3. Complete 1 minor
Number of units: 8 Total credit points: 48

This major offers a diverse set of units in geography, the environment and related discipline areas such as Geographic Information Systems. You will be exposed to an integrated humanities and social sciences approach that provides excellent foundational discipline knowledge as well as industry-specific knowledge and skills. You will explore contemporary environmental issues that will improve approaches to managing the environment. You will develop a unique set of knowledge and skills that are useful in a wide range of careers.

Available units
Students must complete the following compulsory units:
GEOG11023 Physical Geography of Australia
GEOH11001 Introduction to Human Geography
GEOG12022 Geographic Information Systems
GEOG12020 Australian Weather and Climate
GEOG13015 Remote Sensing of Environment
GEOG28001 Applied Demography: Trends and Policies
EVST28001 Climate Change: Risk and Assessments
GEOG13013 Sustainable Regions and Cities
Course Structure

In order to complete this course, you must:

  1. Complete the core structure
  2. Complete 2 majors
  3. Complete 1 minor

History and Politics Major

Number of units: 8 Total credit points: 48

History is both a body of knowledge and a method of inquiry, a way of understanding ourselves and the world around us. It strives to comprehend complex processes of continuity and change and provides insights into how the past influences the present and the future. Historians draw on the largest storehouse of information that exists about how human beings actually behave: the past. Studying History, you will learn to identify, evaluate and interpret evidence, make informed judgements about its significance, debate your findings, and clearly and cogently communicate your informed opinions.

Available units
Students must complete the following compulsory units:
HIST11037 Dawn of Humanity: An Introduction to World History
HIST11038 The Modern World Emerges: An Overview
HIST12009 Power and Politics in the 20th Century
EVST12014 Australian Environmental History
HIST12010 Modern South East Asia
HIST13018 Australia on the World Stage: History and Politics
HIST28001 Modern Japan
HIST28002 War and Australian Society
Course Structure

In order to complete this course, you must:

  1. Complete the core structure
  2. Complete 2 majors
  3. Complete 1 minor
Number of units: 8 Total credit points: 48

The Journalism major will prepare you for a career in journalism and/or media relations. You will be introduced to journalism within the broader contextual framework of media industries, and will engage in debates about journalistic practice. You will learn to write news and narrative in a range of journalism genres, employing the associated requirements of research and analysis. You will apply legal and ethical frameworks associated with journalistic practice.

Available units
Students must complete the following compulsory units:
JOUR11005 Introduction to Journalism
COMM11007 Media Writing
JOUR12040 Narrative Journalism
JOUR12010 Feature Writing
COMM12033 Speech and Script
JOUR13001 Public Relations and the Media
JOUR12039 News Writing and Reporting
COMM13110 Journalism Project
Course Structure

In order to complete this course, you must:

  1. Complete the core structure
  2. Complete 2 majors
  3. Complete 1 minor

Liberal Arts Major

Number of units: 8 Total credit points: 48

Liberal Arts provides you with an opportunity to design your own major by selecting 8 units (48 units of credit), including no less than four advanced level (Level 2 and 3) units, from the following majors and minors: English and Cultural Studies; Geography; History and Politics; and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies. This will allow you the flexibility to pursue a study stream that suits your interests. You must meet the usual pre-requisites and co-requisites for these units.

Course Structure

In order to complete this course, you must:

  1. Complete the core structure
  2. Complete 2 majors
  3. Complete 1 minor

Pathway to Teaching (Early Childhood) Major

Number of units: 8 Total credit points: 48

In addition to the four core units in the Pathway to Teaching (Early Childhood) major, students will complete a minor from eligible Pathway to Teaching minors. Eligible Pathway to Teaching minors are: Environmental Management, Essential Geography, Literary Studies, Strategic Communication, Working with the Media, World History and Writing Stories. Liberal Arts may be selected only if units meet eligibility for entry into the Master of Teaching; do not exceed eight level 1 (AQF 5) units across the Arts degree; and all unit pre-requisites are met.

The Pathway to Teaching (Early Childhood) major is designed to fast-track students to a Master of Teaching and provisional teacher registration in State, Catholic and Independent schools in Australia. The Pathway to Teaching (Early Childhood) will commence your postgraduate studies to prepare you to teach across the Australian Curriculum in the Preparatory Year to Year 2 in Australian primary schools and in early childhood settings (long day care settings & kindergartens/pre-prep).

Students who select the Pathway to Teaching (Early Childhood) major can claim four units of credit into the Master of Teaching (Early Childhood), an approved course with the Australian Children’s Education & Care Quality Authority (ACECQA). This major is suited to students seeking to become an early childhood teacher in childcare/early learning centres and kindergartens. Selection of this major does not guarantee entry into the Master of Teaching course. Students must still apply and be accepted into the Master of Teaching as per normal processes using academic and non-academic entry requirements. Once accepted into the Master of Teaching, students can apply for the four units of credit from the Pathway to Teaching (Early Childhood) major.

Completion of the Bachelor of Arts alone does NOT meet eligibility requirements for teacher registration. Students who select the Pathway to Teaching major must complete the four core units plus an eligible minor to make up the eight units in the major. In addition, when choosing their minor study, students must also select from the list of eligible minors. Eligible Pathway to Teaching minors are: Environmental Management, Essential Geography, Literary Studies, Strategic Communication, Working with the Media, World History and Writing Stories. Liberal Arts may be selected only if units meet eligibility for entry into the Master of Teaching; do not exceed eight level 1 (AQF 5) units across the Arts degree; and all unit pre-requisites are met. This pathway is suited to students who wish to obtain a Bachelor of Arts and Master of Teaching qualification as their pathway to an accredited teaching qualification. This is an alternative pathway to teacher registration to the Bachelor of Education.

Available units
Students must complete the following compulsory units:
EDEC28002 Pedagogy in Early Childhood Education and Care Settings
EDCU20036 Literacy: Learning to Read
EDCU20037 Numeracy Learning
EDEC28001 Responding to Difference: Children, Families and Communities
Course Structure

In order to complete this course, you must:

  1. Complete the core structure
  2. Complete 2 majors
  3. Complete 1 minor

Pathway to Teaching (Primary) Major

Number of units: 8 Total credit points: 48

In addition to the four core units in the Pathway to Teaching (Primary) major, students will complete a minor from eligible Pathway to Teaching minors. Eligible Pathway to Teaching minors are: Environmental Management, Essential Geography, Literary Studies, Strategic Communication, Working with the Media, World History and Writing Stories. Liberal Arts may be selected only if units meet eligibility for entry into the Master of Teaching; do not exceed eight level 1 (AQF 5) units across the Arts degree; and all unit pre-requisites are met.

The Pathway to Teaching (Primary) major is designed to fast-track students to a Master of Teaching and provisional teacher registration in State, Catholic and Independent schools in Australia. The Pathway to Teaching (Primary) will commence your post graduate studies to prepare you to teach across the Australian Curriculum in the Preparatory Year to Year 6 in Australian primary schools. You will begin to demonstrate the Australian Professional Standards for Teachers with evidence and commence study that will qualify you for professional registration with the Queensland College of Teachers, the administering body in Queensland. Selection of this major does not guarantee entry into the Master of Teaching course. Students must still apply and be accepted into the Master of Teaching as per normal processes using academic and non-academic entry requirements. Once accepted into the Master of Teaching, students can apply for the four units of credit from the Pathway to Teaching (Primary) major.

Completion of the Bachelor of Arts alone does NOT meet eligibility requirements for teacher registration. Students who select the Pathway to Teaching major must complete the four core units plus an eligible minor to make up the eight units in the major. In addition, when choosing their minor study, students must also select from the list of eligible minors. Eligible Pathway to Teaching minors are: Environmental Management, Essential Geography, Literary Studies, Strategic Communication, Working with the Media, World History and Writing Stories. Liberal Arts may be selected only if units meet eligibility for entry into the Master of Teaching; do not exceed eight level 1 (AQF 5) units across the Arts degree; and all unit pre-requisites are met. This pathway is suited to students who wish to obtain a Bachelor of Arts and Master of Teaching qualification as their pathway to an accredited teaching qualification. This is an alternative pathway to teacher registration to the Bachelor of Education.

Available units
Students must complete the following compulsory units:
EDED20494 Indigenous Learners and Learning
EDCU20036 Literacy: Learning to Read
EDCU20037 Numeracy Learning
EDED20493 Diversity and Inclusion
Course Structure

In order to complete this course, you must:

  1. Complete the core structure
  2. Complete 2 majors
  3. Complete 1 minor

Public Relations Major

Number of units: 8 Total credit points: 48

Organisations depend on communication professionals to devise and implement strategies to create and maintain positive relationships with stakeholders. Public Relations roles are diverse. You may be employed in the areas of: employee relations, reputation and crisis management, media, content management, event management, communication strategy, and product development, as examples. Public Relations professionals work in community, non-profit, government and corporate sectors. In this major, you will learn to communicate effectively within an organisational environment. You will work on real-world scenarios and with real clients.

Available units
Students must complete the following compulsory units:
COMM11110 Introduction to Public Relations
COMM11112 The Internet Never Lies?: Social Media and Society
COMM12018 Advanced Public Relations
COMM12016 Media Industries
COMM12022 Communication and Global Technologies
COMM20110 Crisis Communication
COMM13111 Public Relations Project
COMM28001 Celebrity Public Relations: Profile, Personality and Positioning
Course Structure

In order to complete this course, you must:

  1. Complete the core structure
  2. Complete 2 majors
  3. Complete 1 minor

Theatre Studies Major

Number of units: 8 Total credit points: 48

The Theatre Studies major involves the study of theatre through the ages. Study areas include medieval theatre, commedia dell'arte, Shakespeare and modernism as well as a range of contemporary Australian and international theatre plays and practice. You will learn about traditions and methods, while developing your own creative practice and understanding of the power of theatre. The skills sets that you can develop from Theatre Studies include the ability to identify, analyse, contextualise and synthesise the dramatic form within its time specific context.

Available units
Students must complete the following compulsory units:
THTR11125 Theatre: Stage, Screen and Musicals
THTR11126 Origins of Theatre
THTR12124 Australian Theatre: Stage and Screen
THTR12125 Comedy and Theatre
THTR12126 Elizabethan Drama: Jonson, Marlowe and Shakespeare
THTR13128 Theatre for Social Change: Brecht, Boal and Artaud
THTR13129 Theatrical Realism: Ibsen, Strindberg and Chekhov
THTR13130 Post-modern Theatre
Course Structure

In order to complete this course, you must:

  1. Complete the core structure
  2. Complete 2 majors
  3. Complete 1 minor
Number of units: 8 Total credit points: 48

Creating visual art enables self-expression and self-exploration, but it also has an important social function. As crafted acts of public communication, visual artworks help us all to understand ourselves and our relationship with the world. Contemporary visual art practices are often motivated by forms of social engagement. Through studying the visual arts, you will learn to shape creative thinking skills into a unique process to create engaging and relevant artworks for public display. You will also hone your critical thinking skills to analyse how culture impacts us as individuals, whilst developing skills to professionally interact with arts infrastructure.

Available units
Students must complete the following compulsory units:
CART11016 Modernism and the New
CART11017 Visual Art Materials and Processes
CART12011 Semiotics and Design for Visual Artists
CART12010 Visual Arts Studio Investigation
CART12009 Contemporary Visual Art Practices
CART13011 Drawing Practices for Visual Artists
CART13009 Visual Arts Studio Refinement
CART13010 Visual Arts Studio: Exhibition Protocols and Procedures.
Course Structure

In order to complete this course, you must:

  1. Complete the core structure
  2. Complete 2 majors
  3. Complete 1 minor

Digital Storytelling Minor

Number of units: 4 Total credit points: 24

The Digital Storytelling minor needs to be studied over two successive years.

Year 1
MMST11009 Digital Video and Audio (no prereq)
MMST11003 Visual Design Fundamentals (no prereq)

Year 2
DGTL12014 Documentary Filmmaking (prereq MMST11009)
DGTL13008 Visual Storytelling (prereq MMST11009)

The initial units of study in this minor introduce you to fundamental skills in visual design and digital video production. Subsequent units cover narrative and documentary film-making techniques. By engaging with activities that integrate practical skills and conceptual understanding, you will learn how to produce visual content for a range of contexts within the digital media industries.

Available units
Students must complete the following compulsory units:
MMST11009 Digital Video and Audio
MMST11003 Visual Design Fundamentals
DGTL12014 Documentary Filmmaking
DGTL13008 Visual Storytelling
Course Structure

In order to complete this course, you must:

  1. Complete the core structure
  2. Complete 2 majors
  3. Complete 1 minor

Discovering Theatre Minor

Number of units: 4 Total credit points: 24

You cannot take this minor if you have studied or are studying the Theatre Studies major.

The Discovering Theatre minor provides a broad scope exploration of theatre connected to the contemporary context. Study areas include musical theatre and Australian drama. Additionally there is an exploration of the origins of theatre through a study of ancient drama. The minor is rounded out with a study of comedy in theatre looking at its evolution in contemporary forms of theatre. You will learn about traditions and methods of styles of theatre and develop an understanding of the power of theatre.

Available units
Students must complete the following compulsory units:
THTR11125 Theatre: Stage, Screen and Musicals
THTR11126 Origins of Theatre
THTR12124 Australian Theatre: Stage and Screen
THTR12125 Comedy and Theatre
Course Structure

In order to complete this course, you must:

  1. Complete the core structure
  2. Complete 2 majors
  3. Complete 1 minor

Environmental Management Minor

Number of units: 4 Total credit points: 24

The Environmental Management minor provides you with employable skills. You will learn the big picture around why an organisation needs an environmental conscience. You will debate the key issues of the Anthropocene and the international context to Australian Government environmental legislation. You will then go on and develop essential skills to help any organisation live up to its environmental license to operate – finding your way around environmental policy, environmental management systems and impact assessment.

Available units
Students must complete the following compulsory units:
EVST11001 Development and Environmental Policy
ENVR11011 Modern Environmental Issues
EVST13018 Environmental Management Systems
EVST13019 Environmental and Social Impact Assessment
Course Structure

In order to complete this course, you must:

  1. Complete the core structure
  2. Complete 2 majors
  3. Complete 1 minor

Essential Geography Minor

Number of units: 4 Total credit points: 24

You cannot take this minor if you have studied or are studying the Geography major.

The heart of geography is earth system exploration at the intersection of place, space and people. With geography, you ponder this new age of the Anthropocene and how population impacts the circulatory systems of the earth that make life possible. The Essential Geography minor provides you with the context for critical thinking wherever employment opportunities take you. You will gain an appreciation of key questions for urban environments, rural landscapes and natural hazards within the architecture of the earth system.

Available units
Students must complete the following compulsory units:
GEOG11023 Physical Geography of Australia
GEOH11001